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Zke Annual 



OF 



EASTERN 
NAZARENE 
COLLEGE 



WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 









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1947 



Editor 



Patricia Herrschaft 



ftusiness Manager 
Richard Hawk 



J^utilu 6 




The Nautilus— an odd name — do you know 
why the first editor, a quarter of a century 
ago, chose it? The nautilus, a small snail-like 
animal, nativ? to the New England coast, 
builds an addition to its shell each year, and 
moves out of its old home into this new and 
better one. What better image for the many- 
sided growth of a college, and for the year- 
book which traces this development. E.N.C. 
has builded more stately mansions" — mate- 
rially, scholastically, spiritually,- for New 
England, for the church, and for God. 



Anniversary 




Zo 



Dean Bertha Munro 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



because for us her name is synonomous with the theme 
of our book, of our lives — with the spirit of Eastern 
Nazarene College — Holiness. Because through twenty- 
five years of publication her influence and guidance have 
been the molding forces behind the book as they have 
the college. Because her life has been as a light to our 
pathway, her standards an encouragement that we might 
study to show ourselves approved unto God; and because 
her example of what "living" Holiness should mean will 
ever stay with us as an earnest of what each of us may 
achieve. 



We Dedicate 




Zhis Book 



forward 



Our watchword — our song, ours because we are 
the people who now are making Eastern Nazarene 
College what she has been and still is, a college prim- 
arily dedicated to God s will and service. 

The 1947 Nautilus presents this college that is 
yours and mine. Here is a panorama of the multitude of 
things that go to make a school year complete. In years 
to come this will be your link with college days, with 
treasured friendships, with time-proven lessons learned 
in and out of the classroom. Above all, your link with 
the school where "Holiness Unto the Lord" was the 
desire, the goal and the achievement. 



Holiness . . . 



You'll Find the spirit of Holiness manifested 
in every aspect of our college life — in the prof's pause for 
a prayer at the beginning of every class session; in the 
emphasis of the Student Council on spiritual activities 
equally as much as social; in student groups vitally active 
in saving souls; in that moment of heart-felt prayer before 
every game — for clean sport and a Christian spirit; and the 
personal help and close fellowship that each of us found at 
our class prayer meeting on Monday night. "Holiness 
Unto the Lord is our watchword and song." 



Contents . . 





Zhe 



President '$ 




Message 



The college yearbook is a panoramic view of 
college life as the student sees it. This is why every year is 
as interesting as an unopened telegram, even to those who 
know what is here. 

This year's staff has elected to paint the picture, of 
E.N.C. under the over-all theme — "Holiness unto the Lord." 
This choice itself is sufficient to warm and encourage the hearts 
of those who have lived and sacrificed for this holiness college. 
But it is a never-ending task. Each year a new group of 
students must be introduced to the ideals and standards upon 
which we have built, and to all of us — old and young alike — 
with each passing year there come fresh implications and in- 
ferences for our lives with regard to holiness. The task of 
our college then is, To present every man perfect in Christ 
Jesus. This is an unfinished task but a glorious one. 

If this year's college annual gives you a glimpse of 
E.N.C. at this noble task of building holy character, then the 
labors of the editor and business manager with their staffs have 
been worth while, and if you can catch some of their enthusi- 
asm you will discover that the investments of the years in this 
institution are now as always bringing forth rich dividends in 
consecrated lives. 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



AKRON DISTRICT 

0. L. BENEDUM 

Box 54, E. Liverpool, Ohio 
E. S. CARMAN 

1643 Lee Rd., Cleveland Heights, Ohio 
E. A. PEFFER 

677 Walnut St., E. Liverpool, Ohio 

ALBANY DISTRICT 

A. M. BABCOCK 

Wilmington, N. Y. 
R. S. SMITH 

229 W. Pleasant St., Syracuse 5, N. Y. 

MARITIME DISTRICT 

1. H. MacGREGOR 

Moncton, N. B., Canada 

NEW ENGLAND DISTRICT 

J. C. ALBRIGHT 

19 Keniston Rd., Melrose, Mass. 
J. W. TURPEL 

62 State St., New Bedford, Mass. 
E. H. KAUFFMAN 

134 Grandview Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 
LEONARD SPANGENBERG 

178 Quinobequin, Waban, Mass. 

NEW YORK DISTRICT 

L. E. ECKLEY 

27 Wilson Street, Beacon, N. Y. 
E. E. YOUNG 

108-05 95th Ave., Richmond Hill, N. Y. 



ONTARIO DISTRICT 

R. F. WOODS 

83 Ottawa St., N. Hamilton, Ont. 
H. V. MUXWORTHY 

363 Main St., Toronto, Ont. 

PITTSBURGH DISTRICT 

R. F. HEINLEIN 

Box 367, Butler, Pa. 
E. H. ELSEY 

27 W. Falls St., New Castle, Pa. 
MAURICE EMERY 

25 Franklin St., Warren, Pa. 
CHARLES SMITH 

40 Meade Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WASHINGTON-PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT 

J. H. PARKER 

3102 Windsor Ave., Baltimore 16, Md. 
E. E. GROSSE 

3311 Gainesville St., S.E., Washington, D. C. 

E. S. PHILLIPS 

2424 Harlem Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

F. D. KETNER 

212 McDade Blvd., Colhngdale, Pa. 

ALUMNI REPRESENTATIVE 

WESLEY G. ANGELL 

PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 

SAMUEL YOUNG 

57 Ellington Rd., Wollaston, Mass. 



Third Row: Ketner, Babcoc-k, Parker. Woods, Angell, Phillips, Turpel, Smith, Heinlein 

Second Row: E. Young, Kauffman, Muxworthy, McGregor, Carman. PcnVr. ('. Smith, Elsey, Albright 

Front Run-: Grosse, Benedum. S. Young. Eckley, Emery 







COLLEGE 




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Alma Mater 

In New England stands a college 

Near blue Quincy Bay, 
E.N.C., our Alma Mater 

Glorious for aye. 
Laud her merits, Sing her praises, 

Let our song ring free 
Hail to thee, our Alma Mater, 

Hail, OE.N.C. 

Graceful branches lifted heavenward, 

Suncrowned for our view, 
Stand the elms upon our campus, 

Reaching to the blue, 
Shady walks beneath the foliage, 

Flow ring beauty rare,- 
Blessed by nature, how we love thee, 

Alma Mater, Fair. 

Clear her vision, high her purpose, 

Lo, she stands serene; 
And her faith is sure, undaunted, 

Eastern Nazarene. 
We will prove our strong devotion, 

Loyal we will be,- 
True to God and Alma Mater 

True to E.N.C. 



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Cord, forever 



'47 




MINISTRATION 



AND FACULTY 



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PRESIDENT SAMUEL YOUNG 

A.M., D.D. 

"For his God doth instruct him to discretion, 
and doth teach him." 



EDWARD S. MANN 

A.M. 

Vice-President 

Seest thou how faith wrought with his 
works, and by works was faith made perfect." 



BERTHA MUNRO 

A.M. 

Dean of College; Literature 

"I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; 
yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life 
which I now live in the flesh I live by the 
faith of the son of God, who loved me, and 
gave Himself for me." 



JAMES HOUSTON SHRADER 

A.M., Ph.D. 

Chemistry 

Rejoicing in hope,- patient in tribulation,- con- 
tinuing instant in prayer. 



J. GLENN GOULD 

A.M., D.D. 

Theology 

"Like a tree planted by the rivers of water, 
that bringeth forth his fruit in his season,- his 
leaf also shall not wither,- and whatsoever he 
doeth shall prosper." 



MARY HARRIS 

A.M. 

French 

"By humility and the fear of the Lord are 
riches and honor and life." 



EDITH FRANCES COVE 

Mus.M. 

Piano,- Organ,- Theory of Music 

"The Lord is my rock, and my fortress, and my 
deliverer,- my God, my strength, in whom I will 
trust,- my buckler, and the horn of my salvation, 
and my high tower." 



JASPER ROSS NAYLOR 

B.S., A.M. 

Dean of Men,- Mathematics 

"And what doth the Lord require of thee,- 
but to do justly, and to love mercy and to 
walk humbly with thy God. 







ALICE SPANGENBERG 

A.M. 

English 

But to do good and to communicate forget 
not: for with such sacrifices God is well 
pleased." 



VERNON THOMAS GROVES 

Ph.D. 

Education 
"Behold the fear of the Lord that is wisdom.' 



KENT GOODNOW 

A.M. 

Classical Languages; German 

"The fear of the Lord is the instruction of wis- 
dom; and before honor is humility." 



J. VERNON BABCOCK 

A.M. 

Biology 

"For he was a faithful man and feared God 
above many. 



MERVEL LUNN 

A.M. 

History 

"Preach the word, be instant in season and out 
of season, reprove, rebuke, exhort with all 
long suffering and doctrine.'' 



G. FREDERICK OWEN 

B.D., A.M., D.D. 

Biblical Literature 

"But the wisdom that is from above is first 
pure, than peaceable, gentle and easy to be 
intreated, full of mercy and good fruits, with- 
out partiality and without hypocrisy. 



MEL-THOMAS ROTHWELL 

A.M. 

Philosophy 

And wisdom and knowledge shall be the 
stability of thy times, and strength of salvation: 
the fear of the Lord is his treasure." 



LOUISE DYGOSKI 

A.B. 

Speech 

"My speech shall distill as the dew, as the 
small rain upon the tender herb, and as the 
showers upon the grass." 







ROLLAND W. PARSONS 

B.S. ; M.S. 

Psychology 

"Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst 
after righteousness: for they shall be filled." 



ESTHER WILLIAMSON 

Dean of Women,- Voice 

Teaching and admonishing one another in 
psalms and hymns and spiritual songs,- singing 
with grace in your heart to the Lord. 



EVANGELOS SOTERIADES 

A.M. 



Lib 



ranan 



"That ye may approve things that are excel- 
lent,- that ye may be sincere and without 
offence till the day of Christ." 




MADELINE NEASE 

A.B. 

Registrar,- Principal of Academy 

"I can do all things through Christ which 
strengtheneth me." 



HARVEY J. S. BLANEY 

A.B., B.D. 

Biblical Literature 

"And God is able to make all grace abound 
toward you: that ye, always having all suf- 
ficiency in all things, may abound to every 
good work." 



ANDREW RANKIN 

A.M. 

History-Economics 

"In all things showing thyself a pattern of 
good works: in doctrine showing uncorrupt- 
ness, gravity, sincerity." 



EDITH PEIRCE GOODNOW 

A.M. 

English Literature 

"Forgetting those things which are behind, 
and reaching forth unto those things which 
dre before, I press toward the mark for the 
prize of the high calling of God in Christ 
Jesus." 



HELEN FRANCES ROTHWELL 

B.S. in Educ, A.M. 

Spanish 

"Charity suffereth long and is kind. . . . Bear- 
eth all things,- believeth all things,- hopeth all 
things,- endureth all things." 











J. ROBERT EMMEL 
A.B. 

Speech 
Fervent in spirit,- serving the Lord. 



OLIVE MARPLE 

A.B. 

Piano 

"But Godliness with contentment is great 
gain." 



GEORGE DELP 

A.B.,Th.B. 

Greek; Church History 

Study to show thyself approved unto God, a 
workman that needeth not to be ashamed, 
rightly dividing the word of truth.' 



ROBERT MAYBURY 
B.S. 

Instructor in Physics 

The law of his God is in his heart,- none of 
his steps shall slide.'' 



/f 



ELIZABETH McFARLAND 

B.S. in Educ. 
Music 
Sound in faith, in charity, in patience. 



JOHN H. SHIELDS 

B.S. 

Instructor in Physics 

He hath chosen that good part, which shal 
not be taken away from him." 




ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS 




IZABETH YOUNG 



MARY RANKIN 



FRANK BOWERS 




7ml t Unto Holiness 
and the Snd 
Everlasting Cife 



ACTIVITIES 



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Student 



OFFICERS 

WILLIAM TAYLOR President KENNETH YODER Fresh. Representative 

JANET SMITH Vice-President LAWSON SAUNDERS 

RICHARD HAWK Graduate Representative Academy Representative 

PAUL MOORE Senior Representative LEE ALLISON Representative at Large 

MARY BELLE HARRIS Junior Representative NEIL McLAIN Representative at Large 

NAOMI NEWTON Soph. Representative PROFESSOR LUNN Faculty Adviser 

ACTING OFFICERS 

LEE ALLISON Treasurer 

MARY BELLE HARRIS Secretary 



Second Kn„: a. Hawk, K. Yoder, !'. Moore, L. Saunders, N. Mcl.ain 

Front Row: L. Allison, B. Taylor. Professor I.unn. J. Smith, M. B. Harris, N. Newton 




{ 38 } 



Council 



The vocal apparatus of the Students' 
Organization is the Student Council. The 
council is a representative group which voices 
our opinions, expresses our thoughts, and 
generally promotes the welfare of our student 
body. 

To pave the tennis courts has been the 
expressed desire of many students for several 
years. This year in co-operation with the 
Alumni Association, the Student Council 
aided by the "N" club and the three Sigma 
Delta societies, took the active part in getting 
the courts paved. 

As a new feature, the council this 
year sponsored two Friday night programs. 
The one during the first semester had as its 
theme "The Story of Plastics" — we learned 
by lecture and demonstration some of the 
many wonders of the plastic industry. The 
Friday night program during the second semes- 
ter was a sacred concert presenting the ' Life 
of Christ," sung by Vesy Stemm, a former 
student of E.N.C. 

Under the enthusiastic leadership of 
the vice-president of the Student Council the 
Fall Party with its rustic atmosphere, the Christ- 
mas Banquet with its seasonal festiveness, and 
the Valentine Party with its romance, were 
socially successful. 

Our democratic spirit was demon- 
strated in the vigorous meetings of the student 
body, while our co-operative spirit was dis- 
played by the joint council-faculty committee 
in the revision of the student handbook 
"Crimson and White." 

With such a spirit, defeat was im- 
possible. 




WILLIAM TAYLOR 
President 



'47 



{39} 




The 



PATRICIA HERRSCHAFT 
Editor 



PATRICIA HERRSCHAFT 
VIVIAN COFFEE 
PAUL MOORE 
MARY LECHNER 
BILL MacKAY 

eleanor emery 
elmer kauffman 
esther colby 
vernon curry 
jean dorothy 
marilyn emery 
barbara greene 
florence mitchell 
vivian musnug 
becky palmer 
conard stairs 
jean dorothy 
Marguerite cate 
martha mayeury 
paul clark 
richard hawk 
leland davis 
marjorie hall 
miss munro 
professor mann 



Editor-in-chief 

Associate editor 

Literary Editor 

Religious Editor 

Sports Editor 

Feature Editor 

Staff Photographer 

Staff Writers 



Art Staff 



Photography Editor 

Business Manager 

Recorder 

Typist 

Literary Advisor 

Business Advisor 



Third li„„ M. Emery, c. Stairs, .1. Dell, V. Curry, K. Kauffman, I.. Davis, W. MacKay, M. Carlson 

Second Row: J. Dorothy, F. Mitchell, E. Colby, B. Palmer, H. Greene. E. Emery, V. Musmie. M. Cornell. M Cati 

Front Rot: M. Lechner, P. Clark, R. Hawk, Professor Mann. Miss Munro. P. Herrschaft, V. Coffee. P. Moore 




■(4(1] 



Nautilus 



Coming into the Nautilus room after 
it's all over but the signatures seems kind of 
like coming home again for us who have spent 
waking and sleeping hours in the office doing 
the thousand and one things that the laity 
never would suppose went into producing a 
representative "Nautilus.'' It was here in the 
first private office the yearbook has ever had 
that lights burned till far beyond midnight 
many more than a few nights,- here that 
"Nauti," the little rascal, first began snoop- 
ing around,- here that the dummy man, 
which is no insult, pored with editors over 
the layout of the pages; here where the 
write-ups for your clubs and societies were 
brought forth. We typed and re-typed and 
proofread by day and by dark: we took snap- 
shots with our own Ansco camera and ran 
the official photographer to the point of 
turning gray overnight,- we annoyed people 
by begging for nickels for phone calls. We 
worked together. In fact, it's hard to say 
just what official title belongs to what person 
— the editor did a little of everything and a 
lot of most things,- the literary editors typed 
and passed judgments on candid snaps,- the 
associate editor did a lot of associating with 
the other editors, and played at drawing, too. 
Only the business manager minded his own 
business solely, but he minded it exception- 
ally well. 

Our Nautilus room was yours, too. 
It has belonged freely to all of us, and has 
homed the yearbook we freely give to you 
for whom it was made. 




RICHARD HAWK 
Business Manager 



{41 > 



Campus 





FRED HAYNES 
Editor 



'47 



Deadlines — headlines — printers — 
typists — and always the little editor, "Fred- 
die Haynes, make up the bi-weekly publica- 
tion of E.N.C. — the "Campus Camera." 
Aided by Advisor Professor Spangenberg, 
Business Manager Oliver Williams and a large 
staff of columnists, artists, reporters, and typ- 
ists, the "Campus Camera" is turned out 
representing the news and views of the 
college. 

The paper serves a double purpose. It 
not only gives the school news, but also 
provides excellent opportunity for experience 
to students of Journalism and those interested 
in writing. 

The spiritual inspiration received from 
Student Council President Bill Taylor's article 
"Seek Ye First," the smiles and chuckles that 
greet "Candid Camera," the interest shown 
in the sports page, and the "intellectual" look 
that comes when one reads Paul Kirkland's 
"History in the News" are only a few of the 
reactions experienced when an E.N.C.er 
reads the "Camera." 

Six hundred copies are printed each 
publication and the support of the paper 
comes from the space sold to advertisers who 
represent the places where E.N.C. trades. 

The aim of the "Campus Camera' staff 
is to present to the students an all-round 
paper — to give the news straight, to tell 
interesting incidents of E.N.C. s campus life, 
and, the highest aim of all, the motivation for 
all others — is to hold aloft E.N.C. 's highest 
tradition — her tradition of Holiness. 



{\t\ 



Camera 





STAFF 






FRED HAYNES 


Editor-in-Chief 


VIOLET MERCHANT 




OLIVER WILLIAMS 


Business Manager 


MARILYN BROWN 




LUKE BRINKER 
ESTHER COLBY 
VIVIAN COFFEE 
DORIS LINGFORD 


Assistant Business Manager 

News Editor 

Feature Editor 

Make-up Editor 


NEIL McLAIN 
ROY STURTEVANT 
ALBERT STIEFEL 
MARCIA CARLSON 
LAWRENCE MULLEN 




EILEEN ALBRIGHT 


Sports Editor 


MARY LECHNER 




STEPHEN NEASE 




VERNON CURRY 




PAUL KIRKLAND 


Columnists 


LAMAR ZIMMERMAN 




ROBERT COWLES 




BECKY PALMER 


Secretary 


WILLIAM TAYLOR 




MARION TURKINGTON 


Photographer 


VIVIAN MUSNUG 
MARILYN EMERY 
FRANK DOMINGUES 


Reporters 


MARY BELLE HARRIS 
MARION KISH 
VIOLET BALWIT 
ELEANOR SMITH 


Typists 


ELMER SCHRAG 




PROFESSOR SPANGENBERG 


Faculty Adviser 


ROY CARNAHAN 




GRADUATES IN THEOLOGY 


Triple Up 



Third Row: L. Mullen, ('. Stairs, R. Camahan, L. Zimmerman, L. Sturtevant, N. McLain, K. Conies, W. Taylor, A. Stiefel 
Second Row: M. Emery, M. Lechner, V. Musnug, M. Carlson, V. Coffee, A. Swenk, M. Brown, V. Balwit, 0. Hickerson 
Front Row: E. Smith, E. Colby, L. Iirinker, A. Spangenberg, V. Ha.vnes, 0. Williams, 1). Lingford, V. Merchant 




•{43 > 




ART HUGHES 
Editor 



Green Book 



It has not been our intention that the 
"Green Book" be merely the literary efforts 
of our Freshman class, nor have we been 
concerned in introducing ourselves to the 
student body. We feel that E.N.C. is grow- 
ing up. She has reached a period of transi- 
tion from a small school to a larger one. It 
has been the experience of scores of schools 
having a spiritual emphasis to approach such 
a period but fail miserably the crucial test. 

We, 1947s transitional wave, must be 
firmly grounded upon the Rock of Ages. We 
must live the privileges that we have in 
Christ. We must grow spiritually even as 
E.N.C. is growing. Our purpose has been 
to show our class, the largest in the history of 
E.N.C, as a responsible organization, eager 
to do its part in the future of our school. 

We have presented this book to you 
through the combined efforts of Arthur 
Hughes, editor,- Lamar Zimmerman, assistant 
editor,- Virginia Brown and Paul Youngholm, 
co-business managers,- and an indispensable 
staff of enthusiastic workers. 



Second Row: V. Brown, M. Maybury, C. Keyes, F. Young, K. Miller, C. Walton, R. McLain, K. Clingerman 
Front Row: A. Merritts, 0. Black, S. Rose, A. Hughes, I.. Zimmerman, R. Allen. R. McGill, W. Huber 




•{44 > 



Who's Who 



Patricia Herrshaft 

William Taylor 
Joseph Biscoe 

Janet Smith 
Richard Hawk 

Jay Patton 
Lee Allison 



This is not a society of hoot owl en- 
thusiasts, though the members may be as wise 
as owls,- it is rather an organization of 600 
American Colleges and Universities, of 
which E.N.C. is a member, listing selected 
students in the annual publication, Who's 
Who in American Colleges and Universities, 
an index guide for the use of personnel 
managers. 

Distinction in character, scholarship, 
leadership, and possibilities of future useful- 
ness to business and society, determine the 
election to Who's Who. Seven upperclass- 
men and graduate students dre selected by 
the representative faculty members and stu- 
dents. Six future ministers and one future 
teacher received the symbolic key this year. 





There was a society that lived in a shoe, 
There were so many Alphas . . . 
but that's where the rhyme stops! The Alphas 
have proved by their activities that they know 
what to do. This Rush Day fifty-seven new 
students decided to Keep in Step'' and 
signed their names at the purple and white 
boot, thus pledging their allegiance to the 
Alpha Society — making the Alphas second 
only to the Betas in the number of the most 
new "children.'' 

Alpha Outing — a trip to the Blue 
Hills — playing and eating fried eggs in the 
great outdoors. 

Big Friday night — March 7 — the 
Alphas presented their program, "The 
Spirit of America. 



Sigma T)eb 




The return of such veterans as J. C. 
Dixon, Freddie Haynes, Charles Akers, and 
the new students coming in made the sports 
horizon much brighter. The Alphas held 
their own in football and the girls won the 
championship in basketball. 

The society was headed by an adequate 
"parentage" — Paul Andrews, president,- Es- 
ther Colby, first semester vice-president,- 
Vivian Coffee, 2nd semester vice-president,- 
Priscilla Harvey, secretary,- Roy Carnahan, 
treasurer,- and Conard Stairs, chaplain. They 
co-operated and kept the Alphas "in step" 
with all the activities of E.N.C., always hold- 
ing aloft her high traditions. In every activity 
Jhe Alpha Society has been Christian, al- 
ways keeping in mind that "the body is the 
temple" and that the temple must be clean. 



ta Mpka 




PAUL ANDREWS 
President 





VIVIAN COFFEE in, 
The Spirit of America. 




The grey and red taxi service which 
welcomed "newcomers" to the campus this 
year, and the Information Booth in the Ad 
Building Lobby were Beta ideas to help new 
students get situated. 

A giant red and white cash register 
animated with real live Betas bore the slogan, 
"Cash in with the Betas." 

The hope that many new students 
would "be sold on the Betas" was realized 
when the largest number joined their ranks 
on Rush Day. 

The Beta outing to the Blue Hills was 
the source of fun and mishap — horseback rid- 
ing and games were an appreciated change 
from class routine, but eating banana cream 
pie with their fingers because of forgotten 
silverware and plates seemed to some to be 
carrying "roughing it toe far. 



ELLIS HORTON 
President 




"The Tale of Hiawatha" 



Sigma T)d 




The Beta Friday night program this 
year was an E.N.C. version of the tale of 
Hiawatha, replete with Indian braves and 
maidens, tepee, et al. 

Every sport found the Betas right in 
there fighting. The Vets put in that needed 
push that made every game exciting, made 
Beta basketball the fastest game on the court. 
Spectator spirit was high, aided and abetted 
by the well-organized and enthusiastic cheer- 
leaders. As a whole, the society put its 
vote behind the sports program by making 
their gift to the school this year a contribution 
toward the paving of the tennis courts. 

The officers of the society were lead- 
ers in all activities and in keeping high the 
spiritual standards of E.N.C. They were Ellis 
Horton, president,- Ruth Bass, vice-president,- 
Luke Brinker, treasurer,- Betty Smith, secre- 
tary,- Paul Yamada, chaplain,- and Bill MacKay, 
athletic coach. 



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From the halls of the Ad Building to 
the shores of Quincy Bay former students 
could be heard urging new students to "Get 
in Tune with the Gammas." On Rush Day 
thirty-nine new students responded and 
signed up at the huge "G" clef of the Gamma 
Musical Staff. 

On a brisk October afternoon a care- 
free group of Gammas boarded a special bus 
for a day of fun at Franklin Park, then went to 
Houghton Pond where each served himself 
to huge juicy weiners, scalding coffee and 
multi-colored cupcakes. 

Once more the Gamma football team 
took over the championship. The competition 



Sigma Det 



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from the Betas and Alphas was stiff and rugged, 
but the Gammas battled courageously on the 
basketball court as well as on the gridiron. 

On Friday night, January 24, the stu- 
dent body was given a "Moonlight Excursion" 
down the "Rivers of America" by the Gamma 
Society. For their enjoyment some of 
America's most beautiful scenery, some of the 
interesting people who haunt the banks of 
American rivers, and famous folk-songs and 
legends were portrayed. 

The officers were Leland Davis, presi- 
dent,- Mary Lechner, vice-president,- Marilyn 
Emery, secretary,- Theda Jones, treasurer,- 
Murray Hewgill, chaplain,- and Professor 
Rothwell, advisor. 




LELAND DAVIS 
President 



ta Qamma 





JOE SKIPPER 
Skipper of the "Moonlight Excursion" 




Honor 

Society 



Humility, unselfishness, obedience, and 
gratefulness were some of the emphases of 
the Honor Society's program, "Cinderella,'' 
or "Beauty For Ashes", presented in the 
spring. Believing in knowledge as an essen- 
tial for correct living, the society proposes to 
promote a high scholastic standard among the 
students, to encourage mental achievement 
and not forget the Christian perspective. 

Those taking at least twelve hours of 
college work, who maintain a B+ average 
and receive no grade lower than B and B + 
in all major subjects, are eligible for member- 
ship in the Honor Society. Those who attain 
membership shall be honorary members there- 
after. 

The officers were: Paul Moore, presi- 
dent; Eleanor Emery, vice-president; and 
Peggy Christensen, secretary-treasurer. 



Third Row: C. Stairs. [,. Allison, F. Jones, K. Smith, J. Patton, J. Biscoe, K. Fulmer 

Second Row: E. Brown. L. Webster, A. Stiefel, J. Smith. M. Cliristensen. M. Emery, 1.. J. Boyd 

Front Roto: M. Lechner, T. Jones. P. Moore. Miss Munro, P. McKenney, E. Emery, V. Balwit 




•{52)- 




Third Row: M. Christensen, I). rleed, J. Dell, 1). Darsch, E. Schrag, L. Pennington, .1. Benton, T. Fry 

Second Row: I). MaeCallum, M. Collin, V. Mitchell, E. Petitt, P. Herrschaft, A. McEIhenny, M. Cornell, M. Turkington, 

('. Bruce 
Front Hmr: I. Kerstetter, A. Merritts, E. Brown, P. Moore, Miss Munro, M. Cate, E. Colby, E. Hale 



"Don Quixote!" "Scrooge!" "Samuel Cole- 
ridge!" "William Wordsworth!" "David Copper- 
field!" "Hamlet!" "Aeneas!" "Chaucer!"-- -such 
were the echoes from antiquity heard at the roll call 
of the Lit. Club, as its members assembled for meet- 
ings with their assumed names. Once a month the 
hand of time turned back the leaves on the Calendar 
of the Living Past, and Cinderella's godmother 
changed the club-room to a British Coffee House as 
Ben Jonson called the meeting to order. 

At each session of the club the students donned 
their Faust mantles and proceeded to explore realms 
of Literature, particularly current literature and that for 
which there is no time in classwork. Also, there was 
some comparative study of past and current literature, 
indicating different types and trends. As proof that 
the Muses have not been neglecting their duty, 
some of the current campus literature was read by its 
originators. 

As the candle burned down at the end of the 
last meeting, the students did not feel that they were 
closing another chapter, but that they were iust be- 
ginning to turn the pages of the volumes of literary 
lore which had been opened to them. 

The officers of this club were: F.velyn Brown/ 
president,- Marguerite Cate, vice-president,- Eliza 
beth Hale, program director,- Esther Colby, secre- 
tary-treasurer; Dean Munro, sponsor. 




Literature 

Club 



{53> 




Music 



Club 



'The listener is as necessary as the 
composer or performer. ' Realizing this, the 
club planned programs which made many, 
even the more or less untrained listeners, 
respond to the various emotional appeals of 
music. Programs included a spell-down of 
musical terms and discussions of seasonal 
music including The Christmas Oratorio, by 
J. S. Bach, the origin of carols, patriotic music, 
and an Easter oratorio. 

The club presented Charlotte and 
Artiss de Volt, concert violinist and harpist, 
at a Friday night program on November 8, 
1946. As a project the club purchased two 
season tickets for the weekly symphony con- 
certs performed by Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra. These tickets were available for student 
use. 

The officers were: Grace Umstead, 
president- Louise Webster, vice-president,- 
Phoebe Peoples, secretary,- Pauline Douglas, 
treasurer,- and Professor Cove, advisor. 



Second Row: W. Billman, H. Ckristensen, It. Naylor, P. Neiderhiser, W. Young, F. Krier, A. Watts 

Front Row: II. Wells. B. Douglas, I' Peoples, I.. Webster, E. F. Cove. <;. Umstead, P. Douglas, P. Yamadp 




•{54 > 




Fourth Hon-.- J. Fields, L. Boardman, ('. Akers, H. Sinden, K. Clingerman, B. Utter, W. Mackay, H. MeNeely, L. Davis, 
P. I.usk, B. Hodges, 0. Hiekerson 

Third Row: E. Smith, W. Jones, B. Palmer, M. Badders, R. Haymaker, C. Gardiner, R. Brigham, M. Maybury, R.Hard- 
ing, M. Brown, V. Doverspike, B. Boozel, A. Parker 

Second Row: M. Kish, D. Mulgrcw, E. Albright, A. Ward, I.. Dygoski, 1>. Hawk, B. Greene, W. Racz, V. Merchant, <.. 
Plumb 

Front Row: E. Emery, II. Marta, E, Dixon, V. Otis, H. Wilson, V. Drown, J. Mink. I. Van Dresser 



Realizing that speech is the medium 
which man uses to inspire and communicate 
one with another, the Speech Club endeavors 
to train students to use their voices to the best 
advantage in order to become forceful and 
effective Christian leaders. Its officers: Rich- 
ard Hawk, president,- Barbara Greene, vice- 
president; Audrey Ward, secretary-treasurer,- 
and Miss Louise Dygoski, advisor,- work to 
make each meeting profitable. The recording 
machine allows one to hear his own voice 
and thus he is able to focus his attention on 
purity and power in voice production and to 
improve and correct his speech. By listening 
to outside speakers, the student learns how 
speech work is carried on in other schools. 
Speech helps him to broaden his horizon and 
in time if will make him a better citizen. 

Mr. J. Robbert Emmel, Speech Club 
advisor for the 2nd semester, rendered in- 
valuable service to the club — bringing new life 
and impetus to its forward moving orogram. 




Speech 



Club 



<55> 




Las 



Estrellas 



Apparently "Las Estrellas" did an ex- 
cellent job of shining in their first year as a 
club, for this year's membership has almost 
doubled. 

It has been the aim of the stars, this 
year, to shine in the direction of Central 
America and the Spanish-speaking islands 
with an intensity of penetration, so as to 
enlighten themselves concerning the daily 
customs, culture, and habits of their neighbors 
south of the border. Various members of the 
club gained a fund of information to share 
with the club by corresponding with mis- 
sionaries and students of these countries. 

A delightful attraction, providing in- 
terest, humor, and vitality, was afforded in the 
person of Vice-President Senorita Carmen 
Marie Morales, a native Puerto Rican. 

Violet Balwit, president,- Mary Weav- 
er, secretary,- Dale Galbraith, treasurer,- and 
Mrs. Rothwell, the faculty advisor, were the 
enthusiastic leaders. 



Second Row: P. Sliope, N. Newton, M. Weaver. E. Smeltzer, J. (liles, B. Lutz, W. Lutton, K. Voder, A. Kinney, M. Dickin- 
son, I*'. Haugh, I. Howard 

Front AW; E. MacPherson, D. Jackson, A. Chalmers, 1). Galbraith, V. Balwit, Mrs. Rothwell, C. Morales, M. ISojrgs, G. 
Hawk, S. Hill 




<56> 




Third Row: R. Carpenter, .). Dodge, A. Hughes, l>. Jones, <i. Goodwin, P. Andrews, L. Watkins 
Second How: R. Allen, I.. Mullen. \V. Brown, (). Williams. <'. Keyes, .1. Biscoe, V. Storms. A. Brown 
Front Row: IF. Dodge, I.. Parsons, It. Brooks, W. Abersold, M. P. I.iinn, P. A. (lark. I. Sanger, J. Nagle 



"Lewis heads miners in coal strike, 
seriously crippling Nation." . . . "Republicans 
take Nation by landslide." . . . "Labor Unions, 



N 



ecessary 



?' 



"Molotoff Renigs." . 



"Peace Conference Complications." Such 
items of vital current interest occupied the 
time of the Historical Club meetings and the 
minds of its enthusiastic members. 

The society is a member of the Carnegie 
Foundation for Peace, whose purpose has 
been to become an active force in its coun- 
try s fight for peace. As a group we have a 
common concern in the current world events 
of today. Our activities during the year were 
organized in such a manner as to aid us in 
understanding the present actions, practices, 
and creeds of our country. 

The officers were: Paul Clark, presi- 
dent,- Bill Abersold, vice-president,- and 
Barbara Brooks, secretary-treasurer. 




Historical 



Society 



{57} 




Bowne 

Philosophical 

Society 



The "Lovers of Wisdom" with Pro- 
fessor Rothwell formed the Borden Parker 
Bowne Philosophical Society, organized and 
perpetuated to direct the students in their 
quest for truth, promoted by incurable human 
curiosity. When such guests as Socrates, 
Plato, and Aristotle were present and ex- 
pressed their doctrine and defended their 
beliefs the monthly meetings proved exciting 
and interesting. . . . This year we have de- 
voted our time to a project — "The Drama of 
Philosophy," presenting famous philosophers 
dramatized by the club members who repre- 
sented these noble characters in vividly 
illuminating skits. 

All activities of the society are directed 
to help encourage the students to more per- 
sistent and correct thinking about life's true 
values. 

The officers were: Charles Muxworthy, 
president,- Laura J. Boyd, vice-president,- 
Bernadine Mobberly, secretary,- and Floyd 
Fleming, treasurer. 



Third Roto; G. 'league, D. Hathaway, R. Carnahan, E. Haner, L. Brinker, K. Cook, V. Curry, 1). Taylor 
Second Hon-: M. Carlson, T. Cross, R. Williams, X. McLain. K. Fulmer, A. Stiefel, B. Berry, A. Brown 
Front Row: W. .lames, B. Mobberly, 1.. J. Boyd. Professor Groves, Professor Rothwell, C. Muxworthy. K. Fleming, I.. Mo 




<58> 




Third Row: P. McKenney, J. Turpel, H. Steiner. 1). Aslin, R. Jones, W Blachley, H. Darling, 1). Shedd, I). Abel, H. Dick- 
inson 

Second Row: M. Taylor. M. West, E. Davis, F. Stevens. K. Smith, P. Alexander, A. McGuire, L. Tokarski, M. Mason, P. 
MaePherson 

Front Itoir: L, Wagner, S. Rose, T, Jones, W. Taylor, Professor Parsons, J. Wood, E. Weaver. M. L. Waters, E. Gardner, 
M. Reminy 



With extreme interest and delight we 
watched the rat trying to escape the maze, 
and reflected how often we had reacted as 
foolishly in life's situations. Even with re- 
markable control, we cowered under the 
scrupulous honesty of the lie-detector. 

The Psychology Club was organized 
this year, under the advisorship of Professor 
R. W. Parsons, with the purpose of executing 
psychological experiments and discussing 
psychological phenomena. 

The projects included extra-sensory 
perception, taste experiments, and lectures 
by outside speakers. Visits to the mental 
institutions and schools for subnormal children 
proved interesting as well as educational. 

The officers were: Erlaine Weaver, 
president; Keith Smith, vice-president,- Theda 
Jones, secretary-treasurer. 




VjV»€.«-« *** 



Psychology 



Club 



•{59} 




Biology 

Club 



For its major activity this year the 
Biology Club chose to continue their work of 
previous years, that of making useful models 
and charts for the laboratory and the class- 
room. Besides receiving academic credit for 
the completion of individual projects, mem- 
bers found the work both enjoyable and 
profitable, in increasing their own store of 
knowledge, developing biological crafts and 
skills and in discovering unsuspected artistic 
ability. Social activities included several 
outings among which was a skating party. 

Officers this year were: Jean Dorothy, 
president; Margaret Lemon, secretary-treas- 
urer,- Paul Basham, vice-president,- Vivian 
Musnug and Virginia Greene, representa- 
tives-at-large. Professor Babcock was advisor 
to the group. 



Third Bote; R. Bass, L. Minn. I). Albright, V. Musnug, P. Harvey, K. Thompson, K. Goodnow, .1. Bryner, E. Kauffman, l{. Leonard. N. Roth, T. Tiugley, 

M . ( ii^t.-i . |{. Jackson 
Second Rote: <>. Cove, It. Dittricli, <>. Black, I'. Pinkerton, M. Stotler, M. Tustin, E. Wheeler. A. Allen. I'. Domingues, I*. Congalton, li. Turner, ('. Uorton, 

B. Smith, K. McGill, B. Johnston 
/ ronl Row: E. Ransom, V. Greene, M. Bastedo, N. Wheeler, M. Plumb, P. Basham, J. Dorothy, Prof. Babcock, M. Lemon, S. Lunn. V. Shollenberger, I. Long, 

M Melnick, C. Hoshmatiaii 




■(fiO \ 




Second Row: I). Taylor, P. Gray, K. Hall, I). Darseh, L. Pennington 
Front Row: F. Allen, .1. Shrader, .1. C. Dixon, \1. Bastedo 



The Chemical Association was or- 
ganized this year at the request of several 
students whose interest in pure chemistry 
gave them the impetus to branch out in their 
work. 

At a meeting called by those interested 
officers were elected consisting of J. C. 
Dixon, president; Frances Allen, vice-presi- 
dent; Myrtle Bastedo, secretary-treasurer; and 
a consitution was adopted which limited the 
membership to those who have had or are 
taking chemistry on a college level. 

Due to the very recent organization of 
the club, opportunity did not present itself 
for large activities, but visits to the labora- 
tories of Northeastern University, M.I.T., and 
chemical industries were scheduled. Dis- 
cussion topics such as "National Scholarships 
Available for Advanced Work" and "Organi- 
zation of the Chemical Industry "made the 
meetings interesting and profitable. 




Chemical 

Association 



*fii > 




Societas 

Prae-Medica 



"Sponge . . . pulse . . . breathing . . . 
scalpel . . ." "Patient normal, doctor . . ." 

Societas Prae-Medica, a newly or- 
ganized society, is a band of students inspired 
with an earnest desire to heal the sick, raise 
the lame, and cleanse the leper. The club 
enables the members to express and gratify 
their interests in the subject and to become 
acquainted with the nature and the perplexing 
problems of the medical profession. 

At a banquet, during the year, Dr. 
Roger Mann, honorary president of the so- 
ciety, delivered a lecture on the present 
educational difficulties confronting medical 
students. The student's outlook should be 
serious; the attitude kind and sympathetic. 
Dr. Hynd presented a talk concerning his ex- 
periences during his twenty-seven years as a 
medical missionary in Africa. 

The officers of the club were: Luther 
Pennington, president,- Floyd Jones, vice- 
president,- and Lamar Zimmerman, secretary- 
treasurer. Dr. Shrader was advisor. 



Thinl Run: V. Babcock, G. Andrews, K. Miller. A. Jaspon. R. Duke. R. Campbell. F. Junes. 1). Darseli 

Second Row: \Y. Allen. M. Bastedo. M. Emery, L. Zimmerman, J. Shrader. L. Pennington, V. Greene. K. Young 

Front Row: E. Martell, F, Doiuingues, H. Blann, P. Gray, D. Taylor 




4 62 } 



Fourth Row: W. Billman, H. Dickinson. E. Wheeler, P. McKenney, L. Webster, D. Shedd, B. Booher, P. I.nsk. 1). Taylor, 

I). ■lones, I. Dodge, M, Maybury, A, Kinney, R. Leonard, M. Carlson, V. Hardy, P. Neiderhi<er, K. Parsons, 

E. Klein, R. Wilson 
Third Row: R. Bass, B. Hodges, M. Brown, P. MacMillan, P. Douglas, C. Morales. F. Stevens, S. Wool. T. Fry, M. Christ- 

ensen, B. Brooks, V. Balwit, F. I'inkerton, L. ('lemons, 1). (lemons, E. Brown, P. Congalton, P. Herrschaft, 

M. Cornell, M, Mason 
Second Row: H. Dodge, M. Melniek, V. Merchant, E. Weaver, V. Greene, E. MacPherson, Professor Parsons, Professor 

Groves, J. Wood, H. Marta, T. Jones, M. C. Boggs, M. Taylor, R. Allen 
Front How: G. Plumb. E. Hensley, J. Mink, .1. Dorothy, D. MacCallum, E. Emery, G. Dittrich, E. Dixon, L. Wagner, E. 

Wray, E. Albright, R. Butterworth, M. West 



She folded her hands firmly on the 
desk, glared at the rebellious pupils and in a 
stern, steady voice brought peace out of 
chaotic confusion. Her teacher technique — 
perfected through patient practice. 

For interesting projects Professor Par- 
sons presented a helpful lecture on his ex- 
perience in public high schools,- Carmen 
Morales gave an inspiring talk on her teach- 
ing in Puerto Rico, her native land. We pro- 
duced a film depicting the method in which 
E.N.C. prepares students for the teaching 
profession. This was our main task of the year. 

The officers were: Jean Wood, presi- 
dent; Helen Marta, vice-president,- Eunice 
MacPherson, secretary; Virginia Greene, 
treasurer,- Theda Jones, librarian,- Erlaine 
Weaver, chaplain,- and Professor Groves, 
advisor. 




Future Teachers' 
Association 



•{63} 




House 



Council 



When the dormitory halls were clut- 
tered with furniture, brushes, brooms, and 
buckets, we knew in a moment it must be 
Open House. "Ah, the efficiency of the 
House Council," was whispered as the 
crowds milled from one tidy dormitory to 
another — Open House — a grand success. 

With the sonorous tones of the moni- 
tor's commands ringing in their ears, E.N.C.ers 
trot wearily off to their rooms for their 
winter's nap. Only by the discipline of the 
council is peace maintained and our rest 
secured. 

If the statues in the library appear to 
have an enhancing luster and resemble more 
the object of the sculpture it's because the 
council undertook the cleaning of the same. 

The sponsoring of the daily evening 
prayer-meetings, the unique girls' party and 
the monthly monitorial meetings show the 
versatility of the organization whose president 
was Jean Wood. 



So ,nd II ■<< : T. Jones, M. Coffin, P. Lusk, P. Gray, I.. Saunders, J. Turpel, M. Cate 

Front Row: V. Merchant, E. Weaver, (i. Dittrich, C. Bruce, I. Wood, I. Bauer, !•'. Mitchell, It. Bass 




4*4 > 




Second Row: A. Rankin, !i. Berry, V. Groves, J. Kelly. W. Caldwell, P. Bartch, J. G. Gould, S. Wool, K. Alcorn, I.. Zimmer- 
man, U. Carpenter 

Front Row: P. Willwerth, W. Abersold, K. Albright, A. Walls. 1'. Christenaen, II. Wells, I". McPlierson, II. W. Brown, V 
Cook 



The blare of the brasses, the trilling of 
the reeds, the rumble of the drums, and an- 
other Thursday night band practice has begun. 
After a lapse of ten years, the band has re- 
newed its activities under the precise baton 
of Professor Rankin, an accomplished musician 
on six different instruments. The progress of 
the association has been incredibly rapid. 

Tapping their feet to the militaristic 
rhythm of "The Gloria March," experiencing 
the plaintive pathos of Bach's "Overture in 
B minor,' or dreaming under the spell of 
melancholy sweetness of Shubert's "Sere- 
nade," the twenty-three members escape the 
boredom of books. 

The administration has assisted the 
organization by providing necessary instru- 
ments and music. We were limited this year, 
in our performances, to arousing enthusiasm 
at the basketball games, and to presenting a 
concert in the spring. 




The 



Band 



\ 65 } 




The 



Miriams 



". . . Miriam, the prophetess, took a 
timbrel in her hand,- and all the women went 
out after her. . . . And Miriam answered them, 
Sing ye to the Lord, for He hath triumphed 
gloriously."' 

The Miriams, all-girl choir, chose their 
name from this Old Testament passage in 
honor of Miriam and her followers who 
praised God in song. 

The major task of the Miriams for the 
first semester was to assist the A Cappella 
choir in the rendition of Handel's "Messiah.'' 

In the spring the girls presented a pro- 
gram of varied selections. A repertoire 
ranging from the beautiful Narcissus to the 
rollicking Nursery Rhymes indicates the talent 
of the girls and the excellent leadership of 
Professor Williamson. 

The choir officers are: Helen Marta, 
president,- Elva Pettit, vice-president,- Iris 
Cove, secretary-treasurer,- and Lorna Allen, 
librarian. 



Third Ron R. Colby, li. (lark. P. Peoples, E. Weaver, R. Harding, K. Allen, B. Hodges, B. Booher, ('. Morales 

/ Rote; J. Dorothy, K. Kelley, E. Anderson. !•'. Mitchell, I.. Parsons. M. Clifton. R. Wilson. K. Gardner. R. McGil 
Front Row: G. Plum. V. Brown, I Cove, E. Petit, Professor Williamson, H. Marta, L. Allen, E. Dixon, P. Neiderliiser 




4 66> 







Worship the Cord 

in the fteauty of 

Holiness 



'47 




RELIGION 





L**$- 



■ 




DON REED 
President 

The Evangelistic Association is a vital part of student life at E.N.C. It has been 
maintained because of the necessity for the students to have an exercised Christian faith, to 
express their burden for souls in active work. This year's president, Donald Reed, divided 
the organization of 225 members into ten groups, each with a group leader, and during the 
year these groups held religious services in Merrimac Mission, Calvary Mission, Emmanuel 
Gospel Center, Union Rescue Mission, Grace and Hope Mission, Good Samaritan Mission, 
Industrial Home, Salvation Army, Bible Classes, hospitals, prisons, on street corners, and other 
places in the vicinity of Boston. 

Such activities afford excellent training for students who are preparing for re- 
ligious work, stress the significance of living a spirit-filled life, and impress the students with 
the desperate need of sin-wrecked souls for the Gospel. All the members have been given 
opportunities to use whatever talents they possessed: to sing, preach, pray, play an instru- 
ment, or testify. 

The officers, including Jerry Douds, vice-president,- Keith Smith, treasurer,- Eunice 
MacPherson, secretary,- and Dr. Owen, faculty adviser,- caught a vision of what could be done 
if more adequate transportation were available to enable more groups to go out and hold 
services. They inaugurated a fund for the future purchase of a station wagon to be used solely 
for Evangelistic Association activities. 

The Association is also influential in helping to maintain the proper spiritual 
emphasis on the campus. 



qelistic Association 




TRIUMPHATEERS 

3erry, W. Abersold. P. Wilfwerth 




DEBORAH TRIO 

D. Lingford, G. Umstead, B. Colby 







HYMN SINGERS 

R. Carpenter, P. Lick, J. Kelly, P. Lockhari 




HERALDERS ^^ 

E. Thompson, A. Sletfe!, E. Pearsall, R. Carnahar 



\ I £« 




FIVE MUSICAL GROUPS 

Most E.N.C. quartets and trios have had 
their beginnings in a dormitory room or in one of 
the practice rooms in the Canterbury. As soon as 
their origin is discovered, they are asked to sing in 
the college dining hall and on Friday night programs. 
Then, imbued with the spirit of service, they have 
found opportunities to sing in missions, at revival 
services and at youth rallies. And, wherever they 
have gone, they have taken their testimony for 
Christ and have endeavored to do service for 
Him. 



PREACHERS' DAUGHTERS 

Albright, B. Palmer, M. Maybury 




Hospital I 
Choir 



Every Sunday afternoon the Hospital 
Group |Ourneyed to the Quincy City Hospital 
and from 3:30 to 4:30 brought comfort and 
cheer to the patients by singing hymns in the 
corridors. Keith Smith and Herbert Sinden 
led the choir and Bonnie Douglas played the 
portable organ. Often patients requested 
certain hymns sung. "The Old Rugged Cross" 
and "In the Garden" were favorites. 

In the wards, the children responded 
with delight to the choruses and motion songs 
sung for them. 

Doctors and nurses have commended 
the hospital choir and affirmed that after the 
period of song the patients' morale was much 
higher. Several patients have written letters 
of appreciation to the group, stating: "The 
singing has been a real help and inspiration 
to me. Or, It is indeed wonderful to 
know that in the city of Quincy we have such 
a fine college as yours." 

The members of the choir themselves 
received spiritual blessing as they endeavored 
to help others; and they were touched by 
glimpses of hospital life — a little lad confined 
to an iron lung; a nurse sweeping through the 
corridor with a new-born baby snuggled in 
fluffy blankets. 



Third Row: E. Haugh, N. Roth, li. Booher, L. A 

kin, I. Long 
Second /(»»■.• C. Horton, X. Vidt, H. Sinden, B. Plant, K. Smith, K. Clingerman 
Front Row: E. MacPherson, I). Young, 1). Young, B. Douglas, M. Plumb, E. I. 



E. Thompson, I). Andrews, H. Wills. K. Alcorn, I.. \\< 



|{. Nil- 




{ 73 } 




£ /. Quartet 



V. Storey, A. McIIwain, P. Kirkland, 

A. Swift 



All through the summer the 
Crusaders, the G.l.'s, and a Ladies' 
Trio were busy touring the East- 
ern Educational Zone soliciting 
funds for the erection of a new 
boys' dormitory, and advertising 
the college in New England, 
New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, 
Maryland, New Jersey, Dela- 
ware, and Canada. 

During the winter the Cru- 
saders held services in nearby 
churches and sang for high 
school assemblies, business 
gatherings, and youth rallies. 




£ a dies' Zrio 



I). Liugford, (.. Maun 
IS. MacParl I 



Crusaders 



I . I >;■ \ i*. (i. Aftdrctt B, 

l\ \ndrow«, It. Hawk 





1 




L 


J 


■ ™ '4 4&£ 


w' 1 


I 1 J* ▼Tw' 



r 



I 





MESSIAH SOLOISTS 

Ken Akins, Grace Umstead, Mrs. Williamson, 
Bettie MacFarland, Homer Smith 

A Cappella 

Choir 



The A Cappella Choir made its debut 
for the school year 1946-47 on December 13, 
1946, with its traditional presentation of 
Handel's oratorio, The Messiah, directed by 
Professor Williamson. The soloists were: 
Elizabeth McFarland, Grace Umstead, so- 
pranos,- Professor Williamson, contralto; Rev. 
Kenneth Akins, tenor; Rev. Homer Smith, 
bass. In addition to lending its support to 
the choir, an instrumental ensemble enhanced 
the beauty of the performance by its rendition 
of the "Pastoral Symphony." 

Highlight of the second semester was 
the A Cappella tour of the entire Eastern 
zone. The work of the year climaxed in a 
concert of sacred music presented in a Friday 
night program in late spring. 

The officers this year were: Charles 
Muxworthy, president,- Paul Moore, business 
manager,- Jean Wood, secretary-treasurer,- and 
Walter MacPherson, librarian. 

The purpose of the choir is that of J. S. 
Bach's, "Music for the glory of God." 



Third Row: W. Brown, W. McPherson, ('. Muxworthy, It. Williams. E. Haner, E. Pearsall, V. Cook, P. Moore, li. Ci - 

bell, 1). Duvall, E, Thompson, K. Fulmer, J. Biscoe 

Second Row: A. Ward, G. Hawk, B. Na.vlor, F. Krier, M. Maybury, C. Keyes, J. Dell, I). Taylor. 1). Abel, 1'. I.usk. I). Ling- 
ford, .1. Bauer, L. J. Boyd, E. Hale. P. Yamada 

Front Row: M. Williams, P. Douglas. G. Umstead, B. McFarland, R. Huskins, M. Cornell, E. Williamson, M. Carlson, 
P. Harvey, P. Herrschaft, J. Wood, T. Fry, F. Otis 







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{75> 



Y. W. F. M. S. 



The first Sunday afternoon of 
each month the Y.W.F.M.S., led by 
Vivian Musnug, president, conducted 
the after-dinner prayer meeting. Pro- 
grams, arranged by Verna Hardy, super- 
intendent of study, included a series of 
studies from "Let Us Look At India/' 
personal experiences on the foreign 
field told by our Puerto Rican student, 
Carmen Morales, and on the home mis- 
sion field in Kentucky by Miriam Park; 
and a specially arranged program by the 
Pre-Medical Association of E.N.C. on 
medical missions. 

This year's sale of Scripture text 
calendars produced the best results 
ever. 

The other officers were Laura 
Jane Boyd, vice-president,- Margaret 
Lemon, secretary, Mary Catherine Boggs, 
treasurer,- Mary Belle Harris, superin- 
tendent of publicity; and Mrs. Ruth 
Patton, counselor. 





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Second Row: H. Patton, M. Lemon 

Fronl Bom?: V. Musnug, M. C. Boggs, V. Hard} 



I.. J. Boyd, M. li. Harr 



L. Allison. P. Basham, M. Emery, V. Hardy, Dr. G. F. Owen 




College 
Missionary 
Society 

Disseminating missionary knowl- 
edge and stimulating interest in the 
world-wide missionary program of the 
Church were the objectives of the 
College Missionary Society for 1946- 
1947. Under the leadership of Lee 
Allison, president, the Society spon- 
sored chapel services featuring well- 
known veteran missionaries, a weekly 
prayer service for the student body, 
and Saturday evening meetings when 
E.N.C. s prospective missionaries prayed 
and discussed pertinent problems about 
their future work. 

Other officers were Verna 
Hardy, secretary-treasurer, and Marilyn 
Emery and Paul Basham, representatives- 
at-large. 



-{ ■«> 



A Bible quiz . . . singing new choruses 
. . . a Thanksgiving feast . . . veterans and 
church attendance in England, Japan, Central 
America . . . special speakers . . . solos, trios, 
duets, quartets . . . every N.Y.P.S. service this 
year was characterized by a splendid spirit of 
co-operation and fellowship. The Council, 
consisting of Murray Hewgill, president,- 
Naomi Newton, vice-president,- Mary Belle 
Harris, secretary-treasurer,- Arthur Brown, 
chorister,- Barbara Greene, pianist; Esther 
Colby, Doris Lingford, Donald Reed, and 
Ray Carpenter, members-at-large,- planned 
programs that were interesting, devotional, 
practical. Many students participated in the 
meetings, and this means of spiritual expres- 
sion was a blessing to them. 

Apart from the regular Sunday meet- 
ings the Society was co-sponsor with the 
Evangelistic Association of a ' Singspi ration ' 



N. Y. P. S. 



as a Friday night program; on December 15 
after the Sunday evening service Christmas 
carols were sung by a large group of students, 
in the surrounding community, and especially 
before the homes of faculty members,- the So- 
ciety sent Christmas boxes to shut-ins, and 
they held an Easter sunrise service. 

Dr. Gould was counselor for the 
N.Y.P.S. 



Second Rmr: A. Brown, E. Colby, D. Reed, B. Greene, R. Carpenter 
Front Rnw: 1). Lingford, M. Hewgill, N. Newton, M. B. Harris 




{11} 



CHAPEL SPEAKERS 



Chapel services have a definite part in 
college life. This year inspirational messages 
from faculty members and visitors, and various 
programs, emphasized many phases of life and 
offered a challenge to every student. 

There was the message by Dr. Young 
on Psalm 119: 165; Dr. Gould's emphasis on 
the "importance of determining and fulfilling 
wants that really matter/' Dean Munro's com- 
ments on the characters in "Pilgrim's Progress'' 
which showed how attitudes and actions de- 
termine one's ' name' ,- Professor Blaney's en- 
couragement towards spiritual maturity based 
on the two admonitions to tarry until; ' Pro- 
fessor Babcock s prayer, 'Enliven my vision by 
Thy presence that where I see Thy beckoning 
I may know that Thou art gone on before me 
even as I must go/ Professor Spangenberg's 
story of Shiro Kano's life. 

Unforgettable is the wholesome laugh- 
ter provoked by Professor Goodnow's various 
emphases on the pertinent question, "What 
do you think?" and Professor Groves' devel- 
opment of Prove all things,- hold fast that 
which is good." 



Figuring largely in the chapel services 
were the contributions made by visitors. 
Rev. C. B. Cox, the evangelist for the Fall 
Revival, helped us to remember "This is the 
will of God even your sanctification/ Rev. 
L. J. Fritzlan brought greetings from the 
Nazarene young people of India and told a 
little about his work there,- Mrs. Julia Lake 
Kellersberger, wife of the General Secretary 
of the American Mission to Lepers, gave some 
of her experiences in visiting leper hospitals 
in Central and South America and Africa. 

Programs by different groups had their 
part, too: the Thanksgiving program by the 
Junior Class,- the reading of letters from former 
ministerial students by members of the Minis- 
terial Association,- the Christmas program given 
by the A Cappella Choir, the Miriams, and 
the Triumphateers,- the presentation of a West- 
inghouse radio-phonograph by the Senior 
Class to the College. 

Several chapel services were dedi- 
cated to testimonies which verified the fact 
that each life was a miracle in itself." 















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{78} 



REVIVALISTS 




The religious life of our College has been 
marked this year by a consistent emphasis upon 
evangelism, and with gracious results. The opening 
convention in September, when Reverend Everett S. 
Phillips, of Baltimore, Maryland, was our human 
leader, set a high standard for the year. God was 
graciously present and many were reached for 
Christ. 

Later in the fall we enioyed a blessed spiritual 
quickening under the sane, impassioned ministry of 
Reverend Charles B. Cox, of Indianapolis, Indiana. 
The results in this meeting were achieved by the 
mighty moving of the Holy Spirit. Truth mingled with 
grace marked the ministry of Brother Cox. 

In March our beloved General Superintendent, 
Dr. James B. Chapman, came to us for eight memorable 
days. The five weekday mornings of this period 
were devoted to the annual Gould Memorial Lec- 
tures, the third series on this foundation. Evening 
services and Sundays were devoted to evangelism 
and particularly to emphasis upon the doctrine, ex- 
perience, and life of Christian Perfection. This 
series formed a fitting climax to the special evangelism 
of the year 1946-1947. 



J. B. CHAPMAN 



STUDENT MINISTKRIAL ASSOCIATION 



Third Row: J. Biseoe, L. Allison, W. Mullen, C. Muxworthy, E. Haner, P. Moore, \V. Lutton, I.. Brinker, W. Abersold, 

C. Harr, H. Parry. K. Smith, 0. Williams, R. Utter. R. Carnahan 
Second Ron.- V. Storms, I.. Board man, C. Stairs, 1). Galbraith, L. O'Brien, 1). Thomas, E. Schrag, Wm. Taylor, P. Andrews, 

V. Curry, W. MacPherson, R. Lewis, W. Ardrey, I). Reed, H. Olson 
Front Row: ,1. Benton, P. Yamada. M. Coffin, V. Doverspike, I. Woodward, .1. Patton. K. 1'ulmer, Dr. Gould, M. Hewgill 

M. Turkington, J. Smith, R. Huskin, R. Hawk, 1,. Moore 




{79} 




Jollow Peace witk 

M Men and 

Moliness 



'47 




ATHLETICS 




y- 







1 1 




Second Row: H. Parry. R. McLain, 
P. (lark. R. Goodnow, .1. I.epter, 
K. I'lilmer 

Front Row: K. Srhrag, H. Nichol* 
snn. O. Uecd, F. Cook, M. Line- 
man 



Led by Harold "Red" Parry, a fighting Blue and Gold Gamma 
football team copped the football championship for the sixth straight year. 
Only one defeat marred a perfect record. Parry, the team's playing coach, 
was the spark plug of the Gamma outfit. He was ably aided offensively 
Gamm3 ^y Fulmer and Clark, two all-round backs. Nicholson and Cook played 

the end positions superbly, and were towers of strength on the defense. 
Don Reed again came through at the centerslot. His defensive play was a 
big cause in the Gamma's winning ways. Once again, hats off to a fine 
Gamma championship team. 



Alpha 



i: ... C. Vkera, I Hnyn 
I. Burton, I'. Baalism, K 
H i aid well 
/ ront Ron . V Matthews, It. Caf 
ferella, \. Hughes, II Sinden, I, 
Watkina 



• 



^ oiler. 




Jootball 



Schedule 



Gamma 

Beta 

Alpha 



on 
7 
5 



Lost 
1 
3 
8 


Don Rctter 
Boots One 



The 1946 edition of the Alpha foot- 
ball team proved to be one of inexperience. 
Nevertheless, the Alphas didn't fail in giving 
their rivals a fight. 

Coach Charlie Akers had plenty of 
material on hand. Larry Watkins developed 
into their best all-round player. Haynes and 
Burton rounded out the Purple and White 
backfield. 

The line was led by Herb Sinden who 
played a rugged game at end. Akers played 
center and backed up the line, while Lock- 
hart covered the other end position. The 
Alphas were deep in reserve strength with 
Caldwell, Northrop, Cafferella, Matthews 
and Hughes. The '47 season should see the 
Alphas an improved team due to a season of 
experience. 




For the second consecutive year, the 
Beta football aggregation claimed the runner- 
up position. The Red and Gray outfit did 
humble the winners once due to the spark 
aided by former G.l.'s. 

The line found Keyes a newcomer at 
the center spot where he excelled. Dom- 
ingues and Eby played the end positions 
superbly on the offense. McNeely took over 
one end position on the defense and played 
an aggressive game. 

The backfield included Retter, Nease 
and MacKay as regulars with Cerratto and 
Carlson in reserve. These men were always 
in there fighting and rounded out the Beta 
machine. 







Beta 



Second Ron W, Mackay, G. Carl- 
son, K. Cerrato, S. Ncasc, l> 
Retter 

Front lln„ : !). Eby, K. Shubert, I 
DominRuez. C. Keyes, II. MrNecly, 
('. Antico 




Koys' 
basketball 



Jump Ball 



Alpha 

The Alphas were just another basket- 
ball team until they added Duane Grimm to 
their roster. From that point on the Alphas 
were definitely in the running. Captain 
Larry Watkins' ball-handling kept his team an 
offensive threat in every game. Paul Lock- 
hart covered the center slot to perfection. 
J. C. Dixon and Grimm were a fine set of 
forwards. Grimm's accurate shooting sparked 
the Alpha offensive drive. Haynes, Watkins' 
partner at the other guard position, shone 
defensively. Abersold was an able replace- 
ment along with Grant, Caldwell, Mux- 
worthy and Burton. This year's outfit em- 
ployed a tight zone defense that proved to 
be their best weapon. 



Gamma 

Sparked by Red Parry and Kenny 
Fulmer, two hold-overs from last year's cham- 
pionship club, the Gammas continued to be 
on top of the Society League. 

Cal Maybury's return from the service 
greatly aided the cause as he used his heighth 
to great advantage. These three key men 
received help from Clark, a fine guard,- and 
Nicholson, an able forward, made the champs 
a formidable outfit. Goodnow, Hall, Reed 
and Mellert filled in superbly when called on. 

Speed, aggressiveness and uncanny 
shots were typically characteristic of the 46- 
'47 edition. The ability to come from behind 
when the pressure was on proved that Coach 
Parry's men were of championship calibre. 



Second Row: B. Grant, 
L. \V;itkins, C. Mux- 
worthy 

Front Run : K. Voder, 
\V. Cold well, W. Ab- 
ersold 




Second Row: 1). Reed, 

K. I'lllllKT 

Front Row: H. Parry, 
E. Hall, C. Maybury, 
P. Clark 




> 



V, 



Beta 

The Betas, improved by newcomers Retter and Dominguez had the opposition on 

and veterans, provided the spectators with their toes. Big Steve Nease, center, was an 

many a thrilling moment. There was a close able backboard retriever. In Walton and 

last minute 18-16 win, a decision dropped MacKay the Betas had a pair of fine defensive 

39-38, and many more exciting wins and guards, 

defeats on the schedule. In reserve the Betas had G. McCabe, 

Two fast dependable forwards in K. Shubert, D. Duvall, G. Hardy, and P. Eby. 




Second Row: K. Smith, 
S. Nease, G. McCabe 

Front Row: P. Will- 
werth.C. Walton, W. 
MacKay, I). Retter 




Alpha 



Second Row: I). Mulgrcw, II. 
Palmer, V. Balwit, I'. Har- 
vey, I). Aslin, M. Maybury, 
K. Anderson, O, Black, II. 
White 

Front Row: E. Smith, A. Hay- 
wood, M. Taylor, K. Al- 
bright, B. Dillricli. E. Uan- 
M s C Adams 



Beta 



.). Giles. I'. Stevens. A. Walls. 
1*. Christensen, C. Norton, K. 
Allen, M. Plumb 



Gamma 



Second Roa: M. Kisl. .1. Doro 
(by, M. Cornell, K. SnielUcr, 
II. Steiner, M. Brown, M, 
Weaver, J. Wood 

Front Rote: M. Dickinson, M 
Emery, ('. Bruce, <». Church 
E. Emery, C. rloshmatian, 

E. Weaver. N . Rotll 



Qirls ' 
Volley Ml 



Alpha 

The Alpha lassies came out as winners 
of the girls' volley ball league. Under the 
able leadership of Eileen Albright, the team 
was undefeated in league competition. The 
Alphas were aided by the all-around play of 
such stalwarts as Aslin, Adams, Anderson 
Taylor, and Haywood. In reserve they had 
Maybury, White and Harvey. For the first 
season the Alphas had the material to win. 
Each game found them stronger than the time 
before as they proved to be tops. 




Alphas 

Betas 

Gammas 



Alphas in Action 



Schedule 



Won Lost 

6 

3 3 

6 



Beta 

The Betas finished in second position 
this year. They gave the champs the closest 
of competition in league play. Led by Peggy 
Christenson the Red and Gray team played 
spirited ball in all games. Janice Giles 
furnished the biggest punch in her aggressive 
play. Allen, Plumb, Gracey, and Watts con- 
tributed their share to the Beta cause. Horton 
and Stevens came through when needed and 
were able reserves. Next season should find 
the team stronger. 



Gamma 

The Gamma girls couldn t get started 
due to tough breaks and inexperience. While 
outclassed, the Blue and Gold spirit showed 
the old "do or die'' fight in every game. The 
two Emery sisters, Eleanor and Marilyn were 
the mainstays of the team. Assisting them 
were Hodges, Weaver, Howard and Wood. 
Brown, Church, Dickinson and Hoshmatian 
played a good game when in action. With a 
season of experience completed the Gammas 
next year will be hard to beat. 




G& 



Second Row: K. Anderson, B. Palmer, M. Maybury, K. Albright 
Front Row: A. Haywood. ('. Nease, D. Aslin, C. Adams 



Alpha 

The girls' basketball league was all 
sewed up by the Alpha girls from the first 
game on. With Esther Anderson and Eileen 
Albright their chief offensive threats the 
Alphas were never headed. Naomi Newton 
kept pace with the Alpha offensive attack 
with her timely shots. Doris Aslin, Christine 
Nease and Ada Haywood were stellar 
guards. Their defensive play held the op- 
ponents scoring to a minimum. Adams, Ting- 
ley, Taylor, Booher and Hazelcamp were 
valuable substitutes. 




Beta 

Experience is a great teacher, and 
next years team will have this added ad- 
vantage to aid them. This year the Beta girls 
suffered many a defeat, but gained valuable 
experience. Only veteran in the line-up was 
Peggy Christensen, captain and center for- 
ward. Betty Gracey and Patti Herrschaft 
played the forward positions. In Janice Giles 
the Betas had the best all-round guard in the 
school. Mary Alice Stotler and Ruth Bass 
held down the other guard positions. Watts 
and Gardner played in the reserve role. 



Gamma 

The Blue and Gold girls' team had an 
up and down season. The Emery sisters 
paved the way on the offensive side. Either 
Marilyn or Eleanor were capable of having 
one big night. Elaine Long found her eye 
around mid-season making the Gammas a 
threat constantly. Alma Swank was a vital 
cog in the machinery as she alternated be- 
tween the forward and guard positions. In 
Erlaine Weaver and Nelda Vidt the Gamma 
girls had two scrappy, defensive guards. In 
reserve were J. Dorothy, M. Dickinson, M. 
Harris, N. Roth and J. Smith. 



Off the Backboard' 



Is ' Uasketball 



Beta 



Second Itoir: K. Gardner, I'. 

Christensen, A. Watts, J. 

(.il,s. 1! (irace.V 
Fioni Roie: It. Bass, M. Plumb, 

( . Horton, I'. Herrsrluift 



Gamma 



Second Row: K. Long. I. Ho« 

ard, M. !i. Harris, N. Vidt, 

It. MM, ill 
front Rote: 0. Cliurc-li, M 

Kmery, K. Emery, K. \\ e& \ 

er, A. Swcnk 





BILL MACKAY 
President 



"N" Club 



The "N" Club of '46-'47 took up the 
cry of pave the tennis courts!" This goal be- 
came a reality during the school year after a 
plan for raising sufficient money for the 
project proved successful. 

The Club functions as an advisary body 
to the athletic committee. Many projects are 
undertaken for the improvement of athletics 
atE.N.C 

Every year at the annual athletic ban- 
quet new members are presented with the 
letter "N." Sportsmanship, athletic ability, 
teamwork, and character are basic require- 
ments for admittance into the Club. New 
members are chosen by the members of the 
Club at the regular annual election. 

The Club functions under William 
MacKay, president,- Esther Anderson, vice- 
president,- Janet Smith, secretary,- Alma Swank, 
treasurer,- and Professor J. R. Naylor, adviser. 



Thinl Row: V Curry. .1. J'. Naylor 

Second Ron -.- E. Weaver, ('. Mayhury. A. Swenk, K. Anders 

Front Rote: F. Haynes, J. Smith, L. Karker, R. Hawk 



W. MacKay. K. Emery 




\W\ 



Cheerleaders 



The spirit of enthusiasm during athletic contests found its 
impetus in the well organized Society cheerleaders. Their loyal 
rooting encouraged many a losing squad, and led in the rejoicing 
over a well-earned victory. They proved their abilities at the games 
where each outfit was well-drilled, high spirited, and smartly clad. 
Each society has cause to be proud of their respective cheerleaders. 



H. White, 0. Black 
B. Palmer, 1). M11I- 
grew, I*. Harvey 




\ Willis. T. V iy. |{. Hri-I1.11 
I'. Stevens, I!. Do 



S're / linir: l\ Honhuiutain. I) 

demons, E. Lyon, I. Cove 

Front lioir: W. Huber, I- . Krier 
M. Melnick, I Nagcl, C 
Gardner 



Zhe Sports Cast 



Every type of sporting activity finds its 
way into the hearts of E.N.C. sports enthusiasts. 
Skating has a large following, especially 
when Joe Winter sets in and gives the nearby 
ponds a thick coating of ice. Skiing and 
tobogganing occupy many minds until finally 
couples make their way to the mountains for 
a day of fun and frolic. 

The minor sports at E.N.C. have their 
biggest following in the Spring season. 
During this period many different activities 
can be spotted on any part of the campus. 
For instance, the fellows and girls ; in separate 
ping-pong tournaments, struggle for the 
coveted championship award. Tennis comes 
to the forefront and the enthusiasm is capped 
by the annual tourneys. Golf takes its place 
in the sporting interest of some fellows, and 
if you look close enough on any sunny after- 
noon you can see many of them with golf 
bags happily trudging their way to the golf 
course. 

Baseball, really a main sport, is actively 
participated in by the three societies. A 
league is formed and the clubs battle it out 
for top honors. Volley ball is constantly 
indulged in by ardent devotees to the game. 

Softball takes over after the evening 
meal with bang-up pick-up games being 
played. Field hockey is being tried by the 
girls and in a few years should be a leading 



girls' sport here. Plenty of room for horse- 
shoe pitching is found at the pits next to the 
gym, where skill and a good eye dre needed. 
All in all there is plenty of activity 
available for all those needing the exercise 
— for that moment away from the books and 
for the complete relaxation that gives the 
individual new strength to carry on. 




STEPHEN NEASE 
Men's Athletic Director 



HAROLD PARRY 
Girls' Athletic Director 




M 



fa Holiness and 

Righteousness before 

MM AH the 'Days 

i ofOurCives 

47 




FEATURES 







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'Dormitory Cife 





How did we ever get along without the new wing? 
Like electricity, it took the actuality to make us realize the 
necessity of our new dorm. 

There are the Nautilus and Camera rooms where 
editors and staff members madly turn out copy,- and the 
Ping-Pong room where students (?) relax from their worries 
of book reports and back work, and play or watch the 
experts. 

Oh, the unforgettable moments in the dining hall 
the requests read after dinner, the lectures about dining 
room etiquette, the ditties that were sung to new couples 
(and re-united ones). 

Crowded conditions prevailed in the ironing room 
where girls signed up two days ahead for the use of the 
Bendix and one frequently heard questions such as "How 
many are waiting for that iron?" 

Then the beautiful rooms! Sunshine pouring in the 
arge windows reflecting on the pink walls! This is where 
we lived — studied, slept, got ready for dates — and cleaned. 
This was the center for the sessions where the girls came in 
end news was discussed, problems told, and advice given 
yes, this is where we got acquainted. 

And the parlor. The fireplace, the soft draperies, 
the beautiful furniture, and the new Westinghouse radio- 
phonograph. This was the place to congregate before 
dinner or after programsand fellowship "one with another. 

The importance of the lobby! The office girl who 
takes calls, gives information, and that little board where the 
buttons dre pressed to call down the girls — those little 
buzzes that bring all kinds of news. The luxuries and pleas- 
ures that the new wing has given us have made it indis- 
pensable. 




\ 



the Scenes 





faculty 



These are the people who, in a large 
sense, willl make E.N.C. such a dear memory 
as we go. 

Their sympathetic interest in our every 
problem has afforded us the benefits of sound 
advice and whole-hearted encouragement. 
Their willing and enthusiastic participation in 
our extra-curricular activities has provided 
the needed balance to make our fun and 
work a success. Their high scholastic standards 
have meant lost sleep and wracked brains on 
our part, but it is we who have profited also. 

Their unanimous whole-hearted testi- 
mony to the faithfulness of God has been an 
inspiration to our youthful and sometimes dis- 
couraged hearts. Their lives are a very 
present proof that holiness is a reality 



1. Dr. Owen 

2. Miss Dygoski 

3. Mr. and Mrs. Lunn and Bill 

4. Prof. Span 

5. Dr. Shrader 

6. Dr. Groves 

7. Dr. Young and family 

8. Prof. Cove 

9. Mr. Emmel 

10. Prof. Harris and Dean Munro 

11. Mr. and Mrs. Rankin 






Christ said: "If you love me, feed my 
sheep. E.N.C. is composed of teachers and 
students who love Christ and who dre feed- 
ing His sheep. The preparation our E.N.C. 
Alumni received here at college has enabled 
them to feed the sheep they find in their fields 
of life. The preacher from our college shep- 
herds his flock; the teacher feeds the minds of 
the lambs and consequently the soul; the 
mother feeds the lambs God has given her in 
a thousand various ways. We feel that the 
world is better for having our E.N.C. alumni 
to help carry the burden, just as we feel that 
our alumni have benefited from the kind of 
instruction we receive here today. We are 
grateful to E.N.C. for her opportunities af- 
forded, and proud of our alumni everywhere, 
who have abundantly received and graciously 
given. 



Alumni 

1. Alberta Cameron 

2. Paul Freese 

3. Mr. and Mrs. Franklin P. Wise 

4. Jean Thome and Peg Dunlap 

5. Eunice Grosse and Jo Lampher 

6. Viola Doverspike 

7. Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Church 

8. Grant Cross, Carl Hanks, and Ken Robinson 

9. Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Dixon 





Senior 



Activities 



ugging old shoe", 
merely 



A mirage'? . . . Frantic folks 
charging with spears, composing novel tunes'; . 
the seniors returning from their scavenger hunt. An apparition? 
These people crawling on the floor, . . . weird noises, 
strange garb, animal-like features? . . . merely the seniors play- 
ing "Little Boy Blue" at their party. A vision 7 . . . merely 
Herrschaft devouring six hamburgers, ten cupcakes, and four 
cups of cocoa. A dream? . . . That handsome Westinghouse 
Radio Phonograph? ... the senior gift ... it plays, it talks, 
it sings. We love it! 

"Where are all the seniors?" "Where, oh where 
can they be?" Were the cries issuing from the open mouths 
of the bewildered students. They have gone to the mountains 
to cool, but the juniors made it hot for them. If Moore hadn't 
washed the night before, no one would have suspected. The 
sneak unsuccessful, but the trip, heavenly. On the thrilling 
ski jump we lost our breath. In the beautiful dining-hall we 
broke all records of our calory consumption. A trip! 

The angel boy, in his soiled overalls, and muddy 
dog, clammered about Miss Miller, fussy old maid -their 
new mistress. . . . Janet Smith's recital. Cleady her words 
echoed through the chapel and through the hearts of the 
listeners. We were proud of her. Skippy Davis stirred our 
emotions and kindled our imaginations as the classic works of 
the past flooded our souls. "I Remember Mama," was a 
humorous reading presented by Eleanor Emery, another 
talented senior. 

Where oh where are the seniors 7 Under the 
haystack fast asleep. The week of comprehensives was passed 
—eyes hung out, teeth shrivelled, brains decayed. In our 
dignified black gowns we paraded maiestically down the aisle. 
The gymnorium was beautiful in its new spring ensemble, the 
junior girls were never sweeter, the boys, never neater tSe 
faculty, never keener, and we — never more thrilled. The 
trip, the banquet — all is well with the world! 

But what would our class have been without the 
constant help of Prof. Blaney, our advisor 7 Class Day |o > 
soared in his masterful address. We were proud seniors. 
Commencement — Mother, Dad, the family- we tingled with 
emotion. The last march, the last song, the last sermon, the 
last diploma, the last applause, the last benediction and our 
college days have ended — Long live the memories! 




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'47 




CLASSES 



111 




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Viola Doverspike 



Kenneth Fulmer 



Carl Harr 



Qraduates 



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"And he gave some, apostles,- and 
some prophets,- and some evangelists,- and 
some pastors and teachers,- ... for the work 
of the ministry. . . ." Eph. 4: 11, 12. Whether 
in a university city, a rural district, a foreign 
clime, or wherever our field of labor may be, 
we press toward the mark for the prize of the 
high calling of God in Christ Jesus. Phil. 
3:14. 

By sincere devotion to Christ and 




Richard Hawk 



Murray Hewgill 



Gordon Maloney 



Stephen W. Nease 



•{ 112} 



*X: 




diligent application to the task of preparation, 
we strive to improve the whole man,- to pre- 
pare our hearts as well as our sermons,- to 
cultivate our sympathies, emotions, affections 
and faith as well as our minds; to develop 
strong characters as well as holy lives, 
aware that we must earnestly strive for the 
best things if we would improve the quality 
of our ministry and grow to our full stature 
as servants of the Master. 



I. W Iward, K. Fiilmcr, li. Hunk. M. Hewgill 



Zheologu 




Cornelius Whetstone 



Irma W. Woodward 



{113} 




Second Row: J. Biscoc, !,. Davis, P. Moore 
Front Ttnn ■: T. Jones, J. C. Dixon, F. Mitchell 



SENIORS 



With stately carriage we journeyed slowly up the long aisle. 
Strains of "Tannhauser" melted into our consciousness. Then our thoughts 
floated back — back. The largest freshman class,- battered, bruised from the 
awkward feats of initiation. War — farewells to our fellows. Scaling the 
rugged heights of the Blue Hills, exercising our sophomore muscles. Choked 
with bewilderment and humility when we sought the sneaking seniors; 
filled with dignity and pride when we entertained them at "Warwick Hall.' 
Peace — vets returned. Then seniors. Snatching strands of hair from bright 
red-heads; plucking frozen beets from neighbor's victory garden — our 
scavenger hunt. Trip to the crystal dreamland in the mountains — unforgettable. 
Groans, moans — comprehensives,- but we lived, saw dawn, felt sunset's glow 
on our Junior-Senior Day. 

Strains of "Tannhauser" again— graduating. Would this be the 
end? Would our friendships cease forever? Thoughts of class prayer- 
meetings our flagging faith strengthened, our distress turned to optimism, 
our darkness transformed to light, our determination renewed, our burdens 
lifted -always with a spirit of sympathetic simplicity. Left -right. We have 
endured the turbulence of war, we have suffered the loss of members,- but 
united by an understanding of one another, by the sharing of mutual woes, 
and by a common knowledge of saving faith through the blood of Christ, 
the Senior Class emerges triumphantly, to exalt the Name of Him who bringeth 
to all men Salvation. 

•(Ill)- 



CHARLES AKERS 

A.B., History 

Alpha football 1, 2, 3, 4,- basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 
Speech Club 4; Historical Society 2, 3 
"Campus Camera" 1, 2, 3; editor 2, 3 
Student Council 3. 

Broad smile and deep-set eyes . . . systematic 
thinker . . . salt and pepper humor . . . "Man- 
sion Master" . . . study first, play later . . . 
likes to tease . . . "Eleanor hates war" . . . 
meticulous appearance . . . bridled reactions 
. . . Christian determination. 





LEE ALLISON 

A.B., Biblical Literature 

"Who's Who" 4; Gamma baseball | 2, 3 ; 
Physical Science Club 1; "Greenbook" busi- 
ness manager 1; Student Council treasurer 4,- 
Evangelistic Association Group Leader 2, 3, 
4; College Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, 4, 
President 4; Student Ministerial Association 
3, 4; Honor Society 2, 3, 4. 

Genuine . . . Christian poise and constancy 
. . . thoughtful quietness . . . depth . . . scho- 
lastic achievement . . . patience . . . helpful 
. . . fulfillment of tasks . . . capable carpenter 
. . . calmly conquering . . . "Some through the 
fire" . . . implicitly trusting in God. 



-(115} 




ESTHER ANDERSON 

A.B., Psychology 

Alpha basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; hockey 3, 4; 
"N" Club 3, 4, vice-president 4; Miriams 
2, 3, 4,- Evangelistic Association 3; Historical 
Society 1. 



Still water runs deep . . . retiring but not un- 
friendly . . . mischievous twinkle . . . Alpha 
basketball star . . . ease at the keyboard . . . 
unassuming . . . well-groomed . . . painstaking 
. . . tenacity . . . self-reliant . . . "My room 
won first prize" . . . her daily life, a testimony. 



PAUL ANDREWS 

A.B., Biblical Literature 

Alpha president 4; Historical Society 1, 4,- 
Sociology Club 3,- Sophomore vice-president 
2,- Evangelistic Association treasurer 2, vice- 
president 2, president 3; College Missionary 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Ministerial Asso- 
ciation 3, 4 ; College Quartette 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Intense personality . . . Alpha Commander — 
Left, Right . . . obliging . . . constant, true . . . 
"effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man 
availeth much" . . . conscientious . . . refresh- 
ing childlikeness . . . abandoned to God's 
will . . . soul winner. 




-{ 116) 



WILLIAM ARDREY 

A.B. in Theology 

Gamma basketball 2, 3,- football 2, 3,- His- 
torical Society 1 , Secretary-treasurer,- Evange- 
listic Association 1 , 2, 3, 4,- Student Ministerial 
Association 1 , 2, 3,, 4; baseball 2, 3. 

Refreshing cheerfulness . . . likeable . . . 
definite sense of humor . . . known as "Bill" 
. . . ambitious worker . . . aggressive . . . con- 
firmed Britisher . . . ministerial air . . . "Dream- 
come-true marriage . . . unfailing friend . . . 
a gentleman . . . practical faith . . . "A charge 
to keep" . . . unperturbed Christian. 





RUTH BASS 

A.B., Biology 

Beta Secretary 2, 3, vice-president 4,- basket- 
ball 2, 3 ; 4 ; Biology Club 2, 3, 4; Future 
Teachers Association 4,- Evangelistic Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 4; College Missionary Society 
1 , 2, 3, 4,- House Council 4, secretary- 
treasurer; Biology Laboratory Assistant 3, 4. 

Hearty chuckle ... a silvery ripple of voice 
. . . enjoys work — ' Birthday card? ... 
quietly friendly . . . knitting, her hobby . . . 
reserved in classroom . . . unpretentious . . . 
assists willingly . . . undaunted sunshine . . . 
steady, thoroughly consecrated Christian. 



{117) 




MYRTLE BASTEDO 

A.B., Biology 

Sigma Delta Alpha,- Biology Club 2, 3, 4,- 
Evangelistic Association 1, 2, 3, 4,- College 
Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, 4,- laboratory 
assistant in Biology and Chemistry Depart- 
ments,- Future Teachers Association 2, 3, 4; 
American Biology Teachers Association 4, 
Honor Society. 

Efficient chemist and biologist . . . reliable 
. . . quiet, till you know her . . . cheerful 
countenance . . . generous . . . unobtrusive 
observer of human nature . . . particular 
pupil . . . won t let you down . . . unsuspected 
humor . . . Med-School objective . . . Christ- 
tian spirit. 



JOSEPH BISCOE 

A.B., History 

Honor Society 4; "Who's Who"; Gamma 
treasurer 2; Historical Society 3, 4, vice- 
president 3,- Psychology Club 1, 2, secretary- 
treasurer 2,- Campus Camera" business 
manager 2, editor 3,- Senior Class president,- 
Evangelistic Association 1, 2, 3, A, College 
Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, 4,- A Cappella 
Choir 1, 2, 3, 4,- Student Ministerial Asso- 
ciation 3, 4. 

Strong powers of argumentation . . . thorough 
. . . often wears an air of detachment . . . 
gentlemanly reserve . . . thinks quickly and 
well . . . leadership ability . . . mimicry . . . 
contrasting moods ... an individualist . . . 
systematic . . . philosophic . . . "boy preacher" 
. . . Christian fortitude. 




{118} 



LUKE BRINKER 

A.B., Biblical Literature 

Beta treasurer 4; Physical Science Club 1,- 
Biology Club 2,- Philosophy Club 3, 4, 
"Campus Camera' assistant business man- 
ager 4; Evangelistic Association 3, 4,- Student 
Ministerial Association 3, 4/ College Mission- 
ary Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Tall Dutchman . . . unmistakable chuckle . . . 
enthusiastic student . . . indefatigable prank- 
ster . . . dependable . . . boyish grin . . . 
gentle mannerisms . . . prestige in the dining 
hall . . . tackles tasks triumphantly . . . catching 
up with the Joneses . . . true, humble Chris- 
tian. 





MARY COFFIN 

A.B., Literature 

Sigma Delta Alpha,- Philosophical Society 2, 3; 
Literary Club 4, 5, 6,- Evangelistic Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3, 6; College Missionary Society 
1-6; Student Ministerial Association 5, 6,- 
House Council 3, 6. 

Manchester Monarchess . . . quick comeback 
. . . heart o' gold . . . eager to please God 
and man . . . solid citizen ... "Mama 
Squaw" . . . nothing, if not frank . . . tempera- 
mental . . . logical reasoning . . . tireless 
worker . . . assumes responsibility . . . radiant 
testimony. 



•( I If )• 




MARGARET CONGALTON 

A.B., Biology 

Sigma Delta Gamma,- Biology Club 2, 3, 4,- 
Evangelistic Association 1, 2, 3; laboratory 
assistant in Biology Department 4,- Future 
Teachers Association 2, 3 ; 4; Member of 
American Biology Teachers Association 4. 



Exacting student . . 
. . . definite goal . 
sociable . . . Peg . 
frank . . . lover of 



. placid . . . persistence 
. . Penny -wise . . . 
. warmth . . . innocently 
mirth . . . overwhelming 



generosity . 
of her own 



. service to others . 
. Christian interests. 



a mi 



nd 



J. A. CRITES 

A.B. in Theology 

Semper Paratus with assignments . . . faith- 
ful class participant . . . faithfully performs 
pastoral and paternal duties . . . perpetual 
briefcase . . . intellectual enthusiasm . . . 
kindly considerate . . . keenness of insight 
. . . mature Christian viewpoint. 




\ 120 } 



THORA CROSS 

A.B., Biblical Literature 

Sigma Delta Gamma; Biology Club 1 ; Psychol- 
ogy Club 2, 3; Philosophy Club 4; Evangelis- 
tic Association 1, 2, 3,- College Missionary 
Society 3, 4. 



Unmistakable opinions 
tive . . . courageous . 
heartfelt sincerity . . , 
. . . keen perception . 



. . amicable . . . ac- 
. . independent . . . 
stability of character 
friendly, but by no 



means familiar . . . Canadian Florence Night- 
ingale . . . her heart —fixed . . . deep-rooted 
Christianity. 





LELAND DAVIS 

A.B., Music 

Gamma president 4,- Speech Club 1, 2, 3, A; 
"Greenbook" photography editor 1; "Nauti- 
lus" recorder 4; Senior treasurer 4,- College 
Missionary Society 1, 2, 3,- A Cappella 
Choir 1, 2, 3 7 - House Council 3. 

Melody Magic . . keyboard capers . . . good 
food enthusiast . . . "Daviee" . . . idealist 
. . . candid . . . frolicsome . . . accommodating 
. . . kind hospitality . . . neighborliness . . . 
always willing to help . . . sentimental . . . 
"I have two announcements" . . . unflinching 
Christian. 



{ 121 > 




J. C. DIXON 

B.S., Chemistry 

Alpha basketball 2, 4 ; baseball 1, 2, 4; 
Chemical Association 4,- Senior Class chap- 
lain 4,- Science Club 1, 2. 

Real . . . benevolent spirit . . . forgiving . . . 
practical and discriminating mind . . . patient 
and efficient . . . faithful student . . . friendly 
. . . ambitious . . . indefatigable tease . . . 
athletic . . . common sense . . . deliberate 
walk . . . enjoys fun . . . follows Christ day 
by day. 



PAULINE DOUGLAS 

A.B., Music 

Music Club 1, 2, 3, 4, vice-president 3, 
treasurer 4; Evangelistic Association 1, 2,- 
College Missionary Society 3, 4 ; A Cappella 
Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Future Teachers Association 
2, 3, 4; Honor Society 2, 3. 

Mistress of musical magic . . . even-tempered 
. . . domestic . . . serious student . . . "Polly" 
. . . soft-spoken . . . consideration for others 
. . . idealist . . . sympathetic . . . practical . . . 
wide variety of interests . . . Big Sister . . . 
flashes of humor . . . daily walk with God. 




{122} 



PAUL EBY 

B.S., Chemistry 

Beta basketball 3,- Chemistry Club 1 ,■ Science 
Club 2, 3; Photography Club 2; Orchestra 1; 
Band 1; Chemical Society 4; League or 
Evangelical Students 1. 



Devoted fa 



mily man 



the challenge of 



chemistry . . . quiet perseverance . . . spirit 
of fairness . . . considerate . . . ceaseless 
worker . . . amiable companion . . . unpre- 
tentious attitude ... at ease . . . pleasing 
smile . . . ambitious student . . . southern 
gentleman . . . quietly Christian. 





ELEANOR EMERY 

A.B., Psychology 

Gamma basketball 2, 3, 4,- girls' coach 4 
Literature Gub 2; Psychology Club 3 
Speech Club 4; Music Club 1, vice-president 
"Greenbook" 1,- "Campus Camera'' 2, 3 
"Nautilus" 3, 4 ; Volleyball; Future Teachers 
Association treasurer 3; Honor Society 2, 3, 4. 

Expressive face . . . energetic . . . individualis- 
tic ideas . . . enthusiastic spirit . . . impression- 
able . . . ability to accomplish . . . sensitive 
emotions . . . aloof, but not indifferent . . . 
diligent student . . . study in contrasts . . . 
outbursts . . . gestures . . . purposeful Chris- 
tian living. 



i 123 > 







VIRGINIA GREENE 

A.B., Biology 

Alpha treasurer 2, 3; basketball 2, 3,- Biology 
Club president 3, vice-president 2; Pre- 
medical Society 4,- Future Teachers Associa- 
tion treasurer 4,- Sophomore Class treasurer,- 
Evangelistic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; College 
Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Does with her whole heart what her hands 
find to do . . . refreshing Virginia drawl . . . 
characteristic giggle ... "I aim to please" 
. . . biology enthusiast . . . bubbling with 
exuberance . . . mind of her own . . . eagerly 
and sincerely seeking God's will. 



VERNA HARDY 

B.S., Education 

Sigma Delta Gamma,- Future Teachers Asso- 
ciation 3, 4,- College Missionary Society 3, 4,- 
secretary-treasurer. 

Refined . . . serene dignity . . . essence of 
femininity . . . fastidious . . . unswerving in 
purpose . . . blameless life . . . demure . . . 
gentle-voiced . . . takes life seriously . . . eyes 
that speak sincerity . . . thorough thinker . . . 
inner strength . . . missionary fervor. 




-I'-'l}- 



PATRICIA HERRSCHAFT 

A.B., Literature 

Beta vice-president 2; basketball 2, 3, 4,- 
"Greenbook" editor 1,- Junior Class vice- 
president,- Sophomore Student Council repre- 
sentative,- "Nautilus" editor 4,- "Campus 
Camera" 1, 2, 3,- Evangelistic Association 
1. 2,- College Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, 4,- 
Physical Science Club 1,- Literature Club 4,- 
House Council 3; A Cappella Choir 2, 3, 4,- 
"Who's Who" 4. 



Beat-up shoes . . . typical co-ed . . . loyal 
Brooklyn fan . . . silent laughter . . . low, soft 
voice . . . philosophical thoughts . . . bubbling 
personality . . . consistent, loyal friend . . . 
well-rounded activities . . . constant searching 
for things of God. 





THEDA JONES 

B.S., Education 

Gamma treasurer 4,- basketball 1,- Psychology 
Club 1, 2, 3, A; secretary-treasurer 4,- Class 
secretary 3, 4,- Evangelistic Association 1, 2, 
3; College Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Miriams 2, 3, A, House Council 3, 4,- Future 
Teachers Association 3, 4,- Librarian 4,- Honor 
Society 2, 3, 4,- Bible Reading 2, 3 ; - President 
of Fidelis Class 4,- Head Waitress 3, 4. 

Thoughtfully friendly . . . expressive speech 
. . . service with a smile . . . high aspirations 
... to know her is to like her . . . thorough 
. . . industrious . . . business-like . . . diversi- 
fied talents . . . practical student . . . unre- 
taliating spirit . . . Christian tenderness. 



•{ I25 )- 




LOUISE KARKER 

A.B., Biology 



Gamma basketball 1, 2, 3; Evangelistic Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3; Biology Club 1 , 2, 3, 4. 

Confident . . . proud and tender mother . . . 
individuality . . . ideal homemaker . . . Gamma 
basketball starlet . . . friendly dignity that 
invites confidence . . . candid . . . capable 
. . . cautious . . . co-operative . . . orderly 
. . . steadfast and loyal . . . missionary out- 
look. 



ANNA MAE KEFFER 

B.S., Education 

Sigma Delta Gamma; A Cappella Choir 1, 2; 
Miriams 3, 4,- Speech Club 3, 4, 5, vice- 
president 4; House Council president 4,- 
Future Teachers Association 5; Evangelistic 
Association 1, 2; College Missionary So- 
ciety 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 

Gracious lady . . . courteous . . . charity for 
all . . . devotion to duty . . . pleasant com- 
pany . . . kind ... in all things, particular . . . 
stately dignity . . . meticulous . . . inner con- 
straint to teach ... a student . . . super-seam- 
stress . . . Christ first. 




i 126 )• 



PAUL KIRKLAND 

A.B., History 

Gamma baseball 3,- Freshman Class president; 
Sophomore Class president,- Male Chorus 
1, 2,- A Cappella Choir 1, 2; G.I. Quartette 
4; Evangelistic Association 1 , 2, 4; Rover Scout 
Troop 4. 

Intellectual curiosity . . . poise . . . The Card- 
board Cardinal . . . mellow baritone . . . 
courteous . . . attentive listener . . . eager and 
diligent gymnast . . . sincere friend ... a 
taste for literature . . . "No, I have to study, 
you know" . . . Christian purpose. 





RICHARD LEWIS 

A.B. in Theology 

Beta football 1,- Student Council representa- 
tive 1; College Missionary Society 2, 3; 
Student Ministerial Association 2, A; Rover 
Scout Troop 4. 

Servant of God . . . studies till sleep soothes 
the distressed brain . . . attentive chapel 
listener . . . unruffled ... "I have a question" 
. . . satisfied spouse and sire . . . inconspicu- 
ously industrious . . . fearlessly doing God's 
will. 



{ 127 > 







PHOEBE LUSK 

A.B., History 

University of California 3,- Gamma basketball 
1, 2,- Historical Society 1, 2,- secretary 1 , 2,- 
Class secretary 1 , 2,- Evangelistic Association 
1; College Missionary Society 4; A Cappella 
Choir 1, 2, 4,- House Council 4 ; Future Teach- 
ers Association 4; Speech Club 1. 

Genuine sincerity . . . quietly independent 
. . . unexpected fire . . . deliberate enuncia- 
tor . . . feels deeply . . . co-operative . . . 
precise . . . concentrated on her studies . . . 
appreciative . . . intelligent common sense 
, . . positive . . . refreshing naturalness . . . 
historian . . . controlled sense of humor . . 
spirit of Christlikeness. 



WILLIAM LUTTON 

A.B. in Theology 

Sigma Delta Alpha,- Evangelistic Association 
2, 3, 4,- Psychology Club 2, 3, 4; vice-presi- 
dent 3, president 4; Las Estrellas 5/ Student 
Ministerial Association 3, 4, 5. 



Mischievous eyes and grin 
cheerful, respectful, obliging 



tease . . . 

good sport 
daring, always ready for nonsense . . . 
serious moments . . . culinary accomplish- 
ments . . . Pennsylvanian with acquired New 
England accent . . . "Willie" . . . whiffle 
hair-cut . . . unpretentious, but practical 
Christianity. 




\ 128 \ 



HELEN MARTA 

B.S., Education 

Sigma Delta Alpha,- Psychology Club 1,- 
Speech Club 4 ; Future Teachers Association 
2, 3, 4/ librarian 3, vice-president 4,- Fresh- 
man Class secretary, Evangelistic Association 
1, 2, 3,- College Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, 4,- 
Miriams 2, 3, 4, president 4. 



A smile like sunlight . . 
. . . lives life to the full . 
Southern Ohio drawl . . . 
. . . nubbly . . . stars in 
worker . . . consecrated 
. . . obliging faithfulness . 



. sweet femininity 

. "my horrors" . . . 

"farmer's daughter" 

her eyes . . . hard 

. . . "I'm Freesing 

. . happy Christian. 





CALVIN MAYBURY 

B.S., Chemistry 

Gamma basketball 1, 2, 3, 4,- football 1, 2, 3, 
4 ; Physical Science Club 1, 2,- Chemical 
Society 4,- "Campus Camera" 1, 2, 3,- Fresh- 
man Class president; Evangelistic Associa- 
tion 1, 2, 3,^4,- A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3 ; 
"Greenbook" business manager 1. 

Tall . . . dark . . . handsome . . . "Cal" . . . 
reserved, noble . . . commanding height . . . 
boyish bashfulness . . . vital concern for his 
Sunday school boys . . . sincere devotion to 
Japanese cause . . . haunts the Chem lab . . . 
unforgettable eyes. 



{ 129 > 




FLORENCE MITCHELL 

A.B., Literature 

Alpha secretary 2, 3; basketball 1, 2; His- 
torical Society 1 ,- Psychology Club 2, 3; 
Literature Club 4,- "Campus Camera" 1 ,- 
"Nautilus" 3, 4,- Senior Class vice-president,- 
Evangelistic Association 1, 2, 3; College 
Missionary Society 1, 2, 3,- Miriams 4,- House 
Council 1-4. 

Flugie . . . wide smile, dimples . . . per- 
petual prankster . . . gay, saucy, witty re- 
partee . . . little girl ways . . . laughs with 
liberty . . . keen perception of human nature 
. . . refreshingly unaffected . . . dependable 
. . . inconspicuously intelligent . . . quiet, but 
genuine Christianity. 



LAWRENCE MOORE 

A.B., Biblical Literature 

Sigma Delta Alpha,- Evangelistic Association 
3, 4,- Philosophy Club 4,- Student Ministerial 
Association 3, 4. 



Even-tempered . . . abounding to God . . . 
stern convictions . . . capable bookkeeper 
. . . devoted husband . . . self-abandonment 
. . . triumphs over great odds . . . patient, 
gentle spirit . . . "Praise to God who giveth 
the victory" . . . faith to remove mountains. 




{ 130 \ 



PAUL MOORE 

A.B., Literature 

Gamma football 2; Class basketball 1, 2, 3, 4,- 
Philosophy Club 2; Speech Club 3; Literature 
Club 4; "Campus Camera" 2; "Nautilus" 4,- 
Freshman Class treasurer,- Sophomore Class 
vice-president; Junior Class president; Senior 
Class Student Council representative; Evange- 
listic Association 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; College Mis- 
sionary Society 2 ; 3, 4; A Cappella Choir 
2, 3, 4; House Council 4; Student Minis- 
terial Association 3, 4; Honor Society presi- 
dent 4. 

Contagious laugh . . . surprising seriousness 
. . . individualistic ... an air of dignity . . . 
able leader . . . extraordinary exuberance 
. . . independent . . . impulsive . . . reliable 
. . . musical talent . . . worry-wart . . . every- 
one's friend . . . understanding . . . sincerity 
. . . Seminary-bound . . . tender Christian 
. . . persistence. 





VIVIAN MUSNUG 

A.B., Biology 

Sigma Delta Alpha; Biology Club 2, 3, 4, 
secretary 2; "Nautilus" 3, 4; "Campus 
Camera" 3, 4; Evangelistic Association 2, 3; 
College Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, 4, 
secretary 2, 3; Honor Society 3; House 
Council 2; laboratory assistant 4; Y.W.F. M.S. 
1, 2, 3, 4, president 4. 

Sweet-spirited . . . millinery skill ... a deep 
thinker . . . shy dignity . . . seriousness of pur- 
pose . . . missionary vision . . . artistic ability 
. . . stays up till the wee sma' hours . . . lady- 
like . . . sensible . . . steadfast faith . . . will- 
ing service to God. 



i 131 1- 




CHARLES MUXWORTHY 

A.B., Biblical Literature 

Alpha basketball 2, 3, A } football 2; Philo- 
sophical Society 2, 3, 4, vice-president 3, 
president 4; "Campus Camera" business 
manager 3; Junior Class treasurer,- Evange- 
listic Association 2, 3, 4,- A Cappella Choir 
2, 3, 4, president 4 ; Student Ministerial 
Association 3, 4. 

All Canadian ... a tease . . . enthusiastic . . . 
bow ties . . . barber-shop quartette . . . 
frolicsome . . . healthy laughter . . . interest 
in the dining hall . . . the country parson . . . 
idealist . . . buoyant, yet humble . . . truly 
admirable Christian. 



LAWRENCE O'BRIEN 

A.B. in Theology 

Gordon Divinity School 1946,- A.B. 
Theology, Gordon College 1946. 



in 



Triumphant through tribulation . . . strongly 
determined to do God's will . . . quietly 
questing for knowledge . . . faith of a mustard 
seed . . . becomingly shy, but not backward. 
. . . intermittent spells of quietness . . . 
"Obrienofski" . . . courageous Christian. 




\ 132} 



HOWARD OLSON 

A.B. in Theology 

Beta basketball 1, 2, 3,- Men's coach 3. 
Freshman Class chaplain; Student Ministerial 
Association 3, 4. 



"Daddy'' . . . student pastor . . . business-man 
efficiency . . . spirited basketball player . . . 
aggressive . . . sense of humor . . . mental 
alertness . . . animated opinions . . . practical 
trend of thought . . . comforting confidence 
. . . maturity . . . respectful . . . spiritual bal- 
ance . . . unfailing Christian walk. 





JAY PATTON 

A.B., Philosophy 

Alpha president 2; Freshman Class president; 
Biology Club 1 ,■ Evangelistic Association 1 , 2, 
3, 4,- College Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Student Council representative-at-!arge 2, 3,- 
Student Ministerial Association president 3, 
vice-president 4,- A Cappella Choir 1,2, 3, 
president 3,- Honor Society 4,- Lyle Eckley 
Scholarship 1, 2,- Honor Society Scholarship 
3. 

Humility . . . upright . . . outstanding Christian 
scholar . . . prominent leader . . . active faith 
with works . . . called of God . . . sincere 
concern for others . . . sweet manliness . . . 
forceful influence . . . inner fortitude for 
every emergency . . . Christian purity. 



•f L33 )• 




IRENE PLANT 

A.B., Literature 



Literature Club 2, 3, 4, 5, president 4,- Sigma 
Delta Alpha, "Campus Camera" 2, 3, 4; 
College Missionary Society 3, 4; Evangelistic 
Association,- Historical Society 1. 

Sincere, devoted Christian . . . conscientious 
student . . . industrious . . . domestic ... fu- 
ture missionary . . . competent . . . quietly 
cheerful . . . sweet prayerfulness . . . deep 
appreciation of beauty ... to know her is to 
love her . . . her life, a revelation of the 
presence of God. 



ELMER SCHRAG 

A.B., Literature 

Gamma football 3, 4,- Student Ministerial 
Association 3, 4,- "Campus Camera" 4,- 
Evangelistic Association 3, 4. 

Occasional boyish smile . . . equanimity . . . 
bashful . . aptitude for literature . . . inquir- 
ing mind . . . reverent, humble . . . lofty vis- 
ions . . . undemonstrative . . . definite feelings, 
but seldom expressed . . . kindly respectful 
. . . exacting . . . unflinching under com- 
pulsion . . . "Living for Jesus." 




{134} 



JANET SMITH 

A.B., History 

Gamma basketball 1, 2, 3, 4,- Freshman Class 
vice-president; Sophomore Class president,- 
Junior Class Student Council representative,- 
Honor Society 1, 2, 3, president 3,- "N" 
Club 3, A; Philosophy Club 1, 2, secretary 2; 
N.Y.P.S. vice-president 3; College Mission- 
ary Society representative-at- large 2, 3,- 
Evangelistic Association 1, 2, 3, 4,- Student 
Ministerial Association 4,- Student Council 
vice-president 4,- "Who's Who" 4. 

Evangelistic fire . . . friendly . . . warmth . . . 
a princess in the province of prayer . . . staunch 
convictions . . . "I'm so happy!" . . . tactful 
. . . serious student . . . sport-loving . . . ener- 
getic . . . domestic capability . . . happily 
engaged . . . full, free laughter . . . practical 
religion. 





KEITH SMITH 

A.B., Psychology 

Beta basketball 1, 2,- football 1, 2,- Class 
basketball 1, 2,- Psychology Club 1. A; vice- 
president 4; Biology Club 2,- Speech Club 3,- 
Evangelistic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, treasurer 
4; College Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, A ; 
Student Ministerial Association 3, 4,- Quincy 
City Hospital Choir director 3, 4,- Bible 
Reading 4, 2nd Prize,- Honor Society 3,- 
College cook 2. 

Capable leader of hospital choir . . . dramatic 
ability . . . blushes readily . . . wide-eyed 
boyish charm . . . firm convictions . . . chef 
par excellence . . . mannerly . . . spiritual 
sensitivity . . . erect bearing . . . plucky . . . 
purposeful . . . one of those Smiths from 
Maine . . . call of the mission field. 



{135} 




MARY ALICE STOTLER 

A.B., Biblical Literature 

Beta basketball 3, 4,- volley ball 4; Biology 
Club 3 ; Psychology Club 4,- College Mission- 
ary Society 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Naive . . . faithful . . . appreciative . . . even 
disposition . . . calm tranquillity . . . generous 
. . . Donut Shoppe cashier . . . purposeful 
. . . peaches-and-cream complexion . . . 
modest . . . consideration for others . . . sym- 
pathetic . . . honest . . . daily walk with God. 



ALMA SWENK 

A.B., Biblical Literature 

Gamma basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; hockey 4, 5; 
Biology Club 2, 3; Speech Club 4; Literature 
Club 4, 5 ; - "Nautilus" 3, 4,- "Campus Camera" 
3, 4, 5,- Senior Class Girls' Coach,- Evangelis- 
tic Association 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,- College Mission- 
ary Society 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,- A Cappella Choir 
1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 



Cheerful optimism . 
. . . athletic talent 
likes people . . 
obligations careful 
l-help-you attitude 
and tendre herte" 
Christianity. 



. . conversational flexibility 

. . ambitious . . . diets . . . 

star secretary . . . fulfills 
ly . . . competent . . . may- 
. . . "and all was conscience 

. . . the beauty of sincere 




{ 136 } 



WILLIAM TAYLOR 

A.B., Biblical Literature 

Beta basketball 2; football 2; Psychology Club 
1, 2, 4,- Philosophy Club 3; "Campus Camera" 
3, 4; Class chaplain 2, 3; Student Council 
president 4,- Evangelistic Association treas- 
urer 1, president 2, vice-president 3; College 
Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, 4,- representative- 
at-large 2 ; "Who's Who" 4 ; A Cappella 
Choir 1; Student Ministerial Association 3, 4. 

Familiar personality . . . gifted speaker . . . 
winning ways . . . student pastor . . . enthusias- 
tic singer and song-leader . . . spiritual zeal 
. . . earnest student . . . reformed Romeo . . . 
arts of argumentation . . . hurried walk . . . 
"Brother Bill" . . . high Christian standards 
. . . daily devoted. 





ERLAINE WEAVER 

A.B., Psychology 

Gamma basketball 1 , 2, 3, 4,- Psychology 
Club 2, 3, 4, vice-president 3, president 4,- 
Evangelistic Association 1 , 2, 3,- College 
Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, A; Miriams 3, 4; 
House Council vice-president 4; Future 
Teachers Association 3, 4. 

Generous, friendly ways ... no sooner said 
than done . . . likes to work with children 
. . . assumes responsibility cheerfully . . . cap- 
able . . . interested in active social work . . . 
ready conversationalist . . . genial good 
sport . . . foul — Weaver! . . . domesticity . . . 
deeply Christian. 



{Y61\ 




LOUISE WEBSTER 

A.B., Music 

Sigma Delta Beta,- Music Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
secretary-treasurer 3, vice-president 4,- Col- 
lege Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, 4,- Evange- 
listic Association 2, 3, 4; House Council 2, 3; 
Future Teachers Association 2, 3, 4; Honor 
Society 2, 3, 4,- Instructor in Piano 3, 4. 

Charitable smile . . . musician . . . fastidious in 
dress . . . obedient to divine will . . . New 
England impassivity . . . mature . . . unassum- 
ing . . . definite ideas . . . genius at work . . . 
incurable student . . . courage of her convic- 
tions . . . Christ above all. 



HAROLD WELLER 

B.S., Mathematics 

Gamma basketball 2, 3; football 2, 3; Evange- 
listic Association 1 , 2, 3. 

Honest and straight forward . . . brisk walk 
. . . all-out purpose . . . cool in the crisis 
. . . sincerity and openness . . . adaptability to 
many trades . . . stick-to-itiveness . . . friend in 
need . . . possesses work-a-day practicality 
. . . future Christian engineer. 




\ 138} 



OLIVER WILLIAMS 



A.B., Histo 



ry 



Sigma Delta Beta,- Historical Society 1, 2, 4, 
vice-president 2; "Campus Camera" business 
manager 4,- Evangelistic Association 1 , 4 ; - 
manager of College Print Shop 3; House 
Council 2,- Student Ministerial Association 
3,4. 

Distinctive chuckle . . . sense of humor . . . 
"That was a joke!" . . . never in a hurry, but 
always busy . . . he's often "Cross" . . . gen- 
erous . . . aesthetic appreciation . . . depend- 
able . . . scrupulous . . . intent on fulfilling 
the call of God. 





JEAN WOOD 

B.S., Education 

Gamma volley ball 4,- Psychology Club 2, 3, 4 ; 
Future Teachers Association chaplain 3, 
president 4,- Music Club 1; House Council 
3, 4, president 4,- Evangelistic Association ^\; 
Miriams vice-president 4,- A Cappella Choir 
3, 4, secretary-treasurer 4,- Honor Society 3, 4. 

Feminine . . . dainty . . . proper . . . replete 
wardrobe . . . ardent future teacher . . . honor 
student . . . earnest opinions . . . decisive likes 
and dislikes . . . music — her hobby . . . desire 
to learn . . . easily entreated . . . distant re- 
serve . . . love for beauty . . . transparent 
complexion . . . Christian habits. 



{ L39 )• 




Second linn. : ]). Reed, 1'. (lark. ('. Stairs 

Front Run: \I. It. Harris I). Lingford, L. J. Boyd 



JUNIORS 



It was the year of 1944. With hopes for a near victory we 
started with would-be sophistication on our college career. Our assumed 
dignity was soon quelled by the Sophomore Gestapo who atoned for all the 
enforced ignominies by a welcoming banquet. Our expectations for victory 
were dashed by the prolonged Battle of the Bulge but we found strength 
from our weekly prayer meetings which were times of inspiration. Our 
special Easter chapel service brought a new vision of the Crucified One. 
... As sophomores we took the ' Greenies" through a horror chamber and 
ended up with more aching muscles than they. Class spirit heightened and 
we became more purposeful. We had a mission to fulfill. . . . Our junior 
year was crowded from beginning to end with activities and excitement. 
Doing twenty-four-hour service as super-sleuths, we were on the alert for 
the Senior Sneak, so we were not surprised when they made their annual 
get-away. On their return we had a jovial time Together." And then 
came Junior-Senior Day. We moved up" for the last time, entertained the 
seniors at a never-to-be-forgotten banquet. 

One more year-incredible,- may it bring the realization of lives 
prepared for His service. 

{140> 



William Abersold 

Impish glee in mischief 
. . . argumentative . . . "Trium- 
phanteer" . . . real worker 
. . . wavy hair ... a laugh all 
his own . . . obeying God. 



Mary Catherine Boggs 

Quiet . . . preoccupied 
air . . . bustling . . . tiny girl . . . 
efficient librarian . . . arithme- 
tic, her amusement ... as 
Christian as she is quiet. 



Laura Jane Boyd 

Cameo profile . . . dis- 
arming modesty . . . feminine 
. . . immaculate . . . calm . . . 
balance . . . her voice, gentle 
. . . philosophical understand- 
ing . . . God's servant. 



Evelyn Brown 

Firm quality under tran- 
quil gentleness . . . skilled 
dressmaker . . . neat in appear- 
ance and precise in habits . . . 
her home, the library ... al- 
ways Christian. 



James Benton 

Little gentleman from 
Washington . . . resourceful 
. . . dry humor . . . impossible 
to alarm or excite . . . curious 
. . . doing God's work. 



Elizabeth Booher 

Betty, of course . . . agile 
athlete . . . scientific attitude 
. . . mask of sobriety conceals 
wit . . . withdrawn but a good 
friend. 



Barbara Brooks 

Studious . . . pensive . . . 
refreshing light moments . . . 
detached air . . . reserved . . . 
keen, analytical . . . deter- 
mined . . . maturity in youth 
. . . quietly progressing, 
achieving. 



H. Weston Brown 

Garrulous . . . suits of 
many colors ... air of a dea- 
con . . . confident . . . oblig- 
ing . . . musical . . . essentially 
Christian. 

Unclassified. 




4*JKfc 



{ 111 > 




Marcia Carlson 

Artistic, musical . . . 
frank . . . "Un Bel Ac- 
cent" . . . dramatic clothes 
sense . . . chic . . . helpful 
. . . typical New Yorker. 



Margaret Christensen 

"Peggy" . . . freckles . . . 
fun-loving . . . friendly smile 
. . . competent student . . . 
behaves in class . . . willing 
. . . responsible . . . heart-felt 
religion. 



Paul Clark 

Impression of not a care 
in the world . . . restless . . . 
definite aversions . . . always 
the same — friendly ... a 
definite laugh . . . never be- 
trays a confidence ... "a 
brain" . . . All for Jesus. 



May Cornell 

"I love life" . . . sweet 
voice of a lark . . . charming 
air . . . cheerful companion 
. . . invigorating humor . . . 
complexion of the country 
. . . desire for the right. 



Marguerite Cate 

Neat . . . careful detail 
. . . intent on studies . . .sub- 
tle wit . . . settled . . . de- 
cisive . . . even-tempered . . . 
reticent ... a ove for llitera- 
ture . . . established Christian. 



Olive Church 

Doll-like . . . out-of-doors 
appealing to her . . . good- 
natured . . . resolved in all 
things . . . vigorously agile . . . 
consecrated, every day. 



Vivian Coffee 

A soft, lingering smile 
. . . calm and poised . . . that 
personal touch . . . mellow 
voice and enchanting eyes . . . 
the air of a lady . . . searching 
for the will of God. 



Vernon Curry 
Mellow spirit . . . sym- 
pathetic . . . quiet tantalizing 
humor . . . congenial ... a 
friend to all . . . unshaken 
faith . . . "joy is the sweet 
voice." 



{ l« )• 



Maxine Dafforn 

Retiring . . . sweetness of 
manner . . . patient . . . thought- 
ful .. . takes duties seriously 
. . . intimate friends . . . 
Christian devotion. 



Gloria Dittrich 

Feminine charms . . . 
laughter in her eyes . . . 
thinks things through . . . ala- 
baster skin . . . shyly mysteri- 
ous . . . wants to be right. 



Jean Dorothy 

Keen, bright eyes . . . 
outdoor girl . . . goldilocks 
. . . easy-going . . . demure . . . 
thoughtful of others . . . quest- 
ing for an ideal . . . fully 
consecrated. 



Joyce Gleason 

Radiant smile . . . precise 
. . . brisk activity . . . enthusi- 
astic Christian worker . . . 
spontaneity . . . harmony, her 
hobby . . . studious. 



Harriet Dickinson 

Courage in adversity . . . 
gently persuasive . . . renders 
favors freely . . . eternally op- 
timistic ... a worker . . . 
God-conscious. 



Esther Dixon 

Raven locks . . . hidden 
sense of humor . . . straight- 
forward . . . likes things in 
order . . . tuneful . . . dreamy 
. . . coy . . . earnest in her 
religion. 



Dale DuVall 

Engaging grin . . . na- 
tural philosopher . . . fond of 
people ... his life devoted to 
medicine. 



Betty Gracey 

Little-girl voice . . . char- 
acteristic giggle . . . ways of 
sunshine . . . tidy . . . pleas- 
ing personality . . . sincerely 
religious. 




{ 143 > 




John Goresh 

Easily excited . . . en- 
thusiastic for the cause of 
chemistry . . . argumentative 
. . . high aims . . . rotund. 



Eldon Hall 

Attending to his own 
business . . . discerning . . . 
alert silence . . . mannerly 
. . . hidden friendliness and 
joviality. 



John Harris 

Expressive eyes . . . little- 
boy simplicity . . . preoccupied 
manner . . . engineering am- 
bitions . . . deliberate . . . 
definite ideas. 



Paul Harris 

Inquisitive ... his car, 
dedicated to service for God 
. . . chuckle of laughter . . . 
believer in logic . . . agitator 
. . . himself, imoerturbable. 



Elizabeth Hale 

The pen is mightier than 
the sword . . . eyes that be- 
witch . . . idealist ... a 
friend . . . working for the 
Kingdom. 



Ruth Harding 

Honest, open opinions 
. . . motherly affections . . . 
regard for others . . . sociable 
. . . unbiased . . . inclined 
toward music . . . "quiet, 
please, girls" . . . unwavering. 



Mary Belle Harris 

A quickly generous smile 
. . . efficient and businesslike 
. . . rosy-cheeked . . . enthusi- 
astic friend . . . mirthful . . . 
willowy in stature . . . spruce 
in appearance . . . zealous for 
God. 



Priscilla Harvey 

Rather sing than study . . . 
"Pris" . . . eyes of celestial 
blue . . . constant smile ... re- 
fined taste in apparel . . . 
Christian determination. 



\ 144 > 



Grace Hawk 

Pensive moods . . . daring 
... an idealist . . . apparent 
unconcern masks competent 
intelligence . . . honest search 
for the spiritual. 



Ellis Horton 

One who wears ■well . . . 
dry wit . . . one of those 
settle-downers . . . willing 
co-operation . . . earnestly 
persevering . . . eternally 
joyous . . . Christian ideals. 



William James 

A Gamma sparkplug . . . 
youthful preacher . . . chatter 
. . . "honorable mention in 
chapel" . . . adequate expres- 
sion in speech and gestures 
. . . words of wisdom. 



Iris Plant 

Pleasing simplicity . . . 
quiet cheerfulness . . . gentle 
character . . . contemplative 
. . . domestic . . . lives for 
God every day. 



Fred Haynes 

Thinks twice before an- 
swering . . . respectful . . . 
thrifty . . . rare betrayal of 
feelings . . . good sport . . . 
"Peashy Posh" . . . recom- 
mends marriage . . . skilled, 
expressive writer . . . unde- 
feated. 



Rosalie Huskin 

Protectress of girls . . . 
most unique job on campus — 
night watchman . . . hidden 
humor . . . her call — her life. 



Floyd Jones 

Low, impressive speech 
. . . intense passion for surgery 
. . . kindly interest in people 
. . . gentlemanly reserve . . . 
conceals humor and geniality 
. . . never betrays confidence. 



Mary Lechner 

Zealous student . . . sweet 
singer in Israel . . . outward 
poise, inner peace ... a 
sympathetic listener . . . never 
unkind . . . obedient. 




•( 145 ]■ 




Margaret Lemon 

Her name, deceiving . . . 
neat, forever . . . key to ever- 
lasting peace and happiness 
. . . true . . . red hair but no 
temper. 



Paul Lockhart 

A real worker . . . good- 
natured . . . takes life seri- 
ously . . . lives consistent, 
heart-felt, Christian life. 



William MacKay 

"Only two slices of 
bread?" . . . constant tease 
. . . incurable sports enthusiast 
. . . New England speech . . . 
helps anyone . . . lovable . . . 
brilliant mind . . . studies oc- 
casionally. 



Walter MacPherson 

Ruddy complexion . . . 
faithful sentry duty under 
certain Manchester window 
. . . retiring . . . characteristic 
enunciation. 



Doris Lingford 
"I'm from Nebraska" . . . 
purposeful determination . . . 
dynamic . . . natural leader 
. . . versatile . . . Western 
drawl . . . mellow altoist . . . 
faithful to God. 



Myrtle Mason 

Fyes that twinkle . . . 
"Fishcakes and Bananas" . . . 
seldom troubled . . . tells 
half a story to tease . . . defi- 
nite goals . . . accepts responsi- 
bility. 



Eunice MacPherson 

Wide-eyed wonderment 
. . . early riser . . . "Tres 
Intelligente" . . . shy . . . 
witty . . . rosy cheeks . . . 
soft, speedy speaker ... in 
God's service. 



Betty MacFarland 

Indefatigable ... im- 
pression of ease . . . spon- 
taneous giggle . . . sings in 
the spirit . . . Willow House 
"Mom" . . . mature, grateful 
Christian. 



•{ 146 } 



Anna McElhenny 


Bernadine Mobberiy 


Robert Mortensen 


Christine Nease 


Ways of a little girl . . . 


"Eunny" . . . everybody's 


"Bob" . . . veteran 


The sweet music of her 


at times, reticent . . . faithful 


best friend . . . china-cup 


preacher . . . father of two 


magic violin . . . sunny South- 


student . . . native innocence 


complexion . . . strawberry 


. . . warm friendliness ... al- 


ern charm . . . malice toward 


. . . surprising mischief and 


blonde ... "1 know what you 


ways a willing helper . . . 


none. 


laughter . . . follows Christ. 


mean!" . . . deep Christian 
experience. 


inquisitive student. 




Mary Melnick 


Carmen Morales 


Paul Neal 


Amelia Parker 


Twinkling blue eyes . . . 


Native of Puerto Rico . . . 


Considerate . . . friendly 


Sparkle . . . dramatic con- 


infectious giggle . . . refresh- 


enlivens meetings with her 


. . . commutes . . . modest . . . 


versationalist . . . simplicity 


ing . . .gingery . . . co-opera- 


Spanish harmony . . . has 


quiet reticence . . . oh! that 


. . . freshness . . . charm of 


tive . . . light-hearted ... al- 


learned to walk on ice . . . sin- 


car . . . unfailing cheer. 


candor . . . living for Christ 


ways friendly. 


cere . . . reserved ... re- 




moment by moment. 




ligious. 


* Unclassified 






•{147} 




Harold Parry 

Likeable red-head . . . 
boyish grin . . . sports de- 
votee . . . carefree air . . . 
one of those "happily-mar- 
rieds" . . . jovial disposition 
. . . energetic Christian. 



Donald Reed 

Burdened leader . . . dili- 
gent worker . . . plucky ath- 
lete . . . arms of Atlas . . . 
youthful moods . . . evange- 
listic projects . . . Christian 
principle. 



Elizabeth Smith 

Shy . . . blonde, blue- 
eyed maiden from the farm 
. . . unexpected fire . . . ad- 
venturous . . . ability to blush 
. . . energetic . . . hunger for 
God. 



Chester Staples 

Southern drawl . . . man 
of few words . . . positive 
ideas . . . navy man . . .con- 
stantly true. 



Luther Pennington 

Unhurried . . . "Got any- 
thing to eat?" . . . tennis 
champ . . . "tall stories" 
"The most important thing is 
to understand people." 



Dorothy Shedd 

"Dottie" . . . chatterbox 
. . . definite opinions . . . kind 
heart, clement . . . sanguine 
. . . independent . . . self- 
contained . . . intelligent, 
self-experienced testimony. 



Conard Stairs 

Obvious laugh ... al- 
ways happy . . . representative 
of the Maple Leaf . . . com- 
petent Junior "Prexy" . . . 
consistent servant of God. 



Victor Storms 
"Stormy" . . . leisurely 
drawl . . . shuffling gait . . . 
stoical . . . air of indifference 
masks observant curiosity . . . 
thirsting for things spiritual. 



{ 148 } 



Leroy H. Sturtevant 

Courteous usher . . . 
"Pop" . . . graceful chorister 
. . . hidden talent . . . under- 
standing . . . charm in his 
smile . . . co-operative . . . 
full pen . . . Christian gentle- 
man. 



Donald Taylor 

Typical New Englander 
. . . stocky . . . scholarly intelli- 
gence . . . versatile conversa- 
tionalist . . . takes life serious- 
ly .. . enjoys a friendly argu- 
ment . . . dedicated. 



David Thomas 

Serious . . . steady ... a 
practical, systematic mind . . . 
calmly pursuing . . . achieving 
. . . paternal affection. 



Bettie Lee Turner 

Precise . . . quiet, dig- 
nified reserve . . . unruffled 
. . . "Sweet Virginia Belle " 
. . . individualistic . . . "Dad- 
dy's Girl" . . . modest . . . 
discriminating . . . devoted. 



Kenneth Sullivan 

Expansive boyish grin . . . 
perambulatin' with Junior . . . 
roguish laugh . . . gentle, 
mature . . . friendly . . . fiery 
Canadian preacher. 



Becky Teal 

Appreciative . . . quick 
. . . lively . . . sympathetic un- 
derstanding . . . good student 
. . . she served her country,- 
she serves her God. 



Marion Turkington 

Keen thinker and ob- 
server . . . uncompromising . . . 
capable of friendly mischief 
. . . studies diligently and 
purposefully . . . ' Dean Turk" 
. . . deeply consecrated to 
will of God. 



Jennie Turpel 

Professional efficiency . . . 
interest in people . . . good- 
natured . . . sparkling humor 
. . . makes acquaintances easily 
. . . quietly doing God's will. 




•{149 > 




Grace Umstead 

The song on her lips be- 
speaks the song in her heart 
. . . merry . . . clear, innocent 
brown eyes . . . steady, sensi- 
ble . . . calm, poised. 



Robert Utter 

Bow-ties . . . hearty, 
abrupt laughter . . . clear, 
ringing voice . . . meditative 
. . . spiritual sensitivity . . . 
"Go- and preach.'' 



Irene VanDressar 

Distinctive walk . . . ex- 
citable . . . fluidity of speech 
. . . school-girl complexion 
. . . wide-eyed interest . . . 
spontaneous — beaming . . . 
her call is deep, sure, in- 
spiring. 

Mary Weaver 

Genial, accommodating 
. . . pleasant office girl . . . 
thorough, likes things done 
well . . . independent . . . 
quiet . . . happy . . . utterly 
dependent upon God. 



Margie West 

Oklahoma wit . . . prac- 
tical . . . always agreeable 
. . . shy reticence . . . blushes 
. . . smiles with those big 
brown eyes . . . studious. 



Ruth Wilson 
Soft, lyric voice . . . gen- 
tle .. . motherly . . . dreamy 
... a melody on her lips . . . 
air of tranquility . . . pleasant 
eternally . . . ring in her 
voice. 



Paul Yamada 

"They also serve 
only stand and wait" 
sweet boy soprano . . 
plicity of faith . . . "Yo" 
laughs with a will. 



/ho 






■I L50 1- 





ones, H. Greene 



SOPHOMORES 



Joyfully - parting with battered history books, we mournfully 
accepted overwhelmingly huge literature books . . . and officially became 
Sophomores. Remembering how we cowered under the tyrannical reign 
of last year's Sophomores, we endeavored to frighten the toughest freshman 
class, but, alas — we merely succeeded in learning their names. Before dawn, 
sophomores could be heard driving unrecognizable freshmen through the 
"House of Horrors" and out onto the athletic field for their traditional calis- 
thenics. Initiation night found "Judge" Floyd Flemming, weak and weary, 
pronouncing sentence on four bewildered, protesting freshmen. Our task 
ended . . . relief! 

The worries of books forgotten, we greedily imbibed the re- 
freshing beauty of New England s countryside during our outing. 

Memories, alone, of inspirational prayermeetings in Room 25 will 
provide strength for service. 

We have reached the half-way mark of our college days. With 
wistful anticipation we seek to perform, with all diligence, the will of 

God. 

•{ LSI } 




Eileen Albright 

David Aldridge 

Willis Allen 

Sandy Ardrey 



Doris Aslin 

Merna Badders 

Violet Balwit 

Edwin Banham 



Paul Basham 

June Bauer 

Bruce Berry 

Dorothy Blauser 



Lothrop Boardman 

Bernice Boozell 

Marilyn Brown 

Virginia Brown 



Constance Bruce 
Ronald Bula 

Ruth Butterworth 

Ray Campbell 



Roy Carnahan 

Ray Carpenter (special) 
Betty Christensen 

Doris demons 



•{152} 



Luella Clemons 

Martha Clifton 

Esther Colby 

Charles Coller 



Francis Cook 

Iris Cove 

Robert Cowles 

Elizabeth Cowles 



Lowell Crutcher 
Jack Dell 

Margaret Dickinson 
Betty Dittrich 



Helen Dodge 

Frank Domingues 

Francis Dorsett 

Bonnie Douglas 



David Eby 

Marilyn Emery 

Mary Jane Ewing 

Floyd Flemmina 



Dale Galbraith 

Claudine Gardiner 

Robert Goodnow 

Bertram Grant 





Paul Gray 

Barbara Greene 

Mariorie Hall 

Bernice Hane 



Everett Haner 

Dudley Hathaway 
Lois Haylett 

Ada Haywood 



Opal Hickerson 

Barbara Hodges 

Cora Hoshmatian 

Rogene Jackson 



Betty Johnstone 

DeRand Jones 

Madelyn Jones 

Robert Jones 



Winnifred Jones 

Harland C. Joyce 

Elmer Kauffman 

Alverda Kinney 



Marion Kish 

Ruth Leonard 

Evelyn Libby 

Sylvia Lunn 



I 154 J- 



Doris MacCullum 

Art Mcllwain 

Pearl McKinney 

Neal McLain 



Violet Merchant 

Juanita Mink 

Lawrence Mullen 

Beulah Naylor 



Naomi Newton 

Florence Otis 

Becky Palmer 

Elva Pettit 



Frank Pinkerton 

Betty Plant 

Grace Plumb 

Donald Retter 



Norme Roth 

Lucy Russell 

John Scott 

Arlene Seitz 



Patsy Shope 

Vivian Shollenberger 
Thelma Shuman 

Eleanor Smith 





Faith Stevens 

Albert Stiefe! 

Helen Sterner 

Mdrjone Thurber 



Treva Tingley 

Audrey Ward 

Natalie Wheeler 

Roger Williams 



Albert Winsor 

Elaine Witmer 

Marvin Zimmerman 



Not pictured: 

R. Lewis Adams 

Daniel Hazelton 

Carl Ryans 



■[ L56 J- 




Second Row: A. Hughes, I). DuVall, K. Yoder 
Front Row: M. Maybury, .1. Kelly, A. Brown 
2nd Semester: Vice-President Lamar Zimmermi 



FRESHMEN 



Class of 1950, an active, moving force with something of a G.I. 
flavor, moved into the E.N.C. realm with a determination to do things, and 
do things it did. 

Talent was not lacking in this new crowd. The freshness of 
youth and the earnestness of older members combined to pack an explosive 
force that was quickly detonated. The explosion was heard quite loudly 
on the football field where three freshmen gained positions on the all-star 
team. Again, basketball was taken in stride, as they made no small noise on 
the court. In an even greater measure they were heard in singing specials, 
playing trumpets, and participating in almost every campus activity. In a 
manner becoming veteran seniors they "pulled their pranks, and with very 
little coaching they found their way to Merrymount. 

Under stalwart guidance the largest class in the history of the 
college moved forward for Christ. Many of its members were frequently 
heard witnessing for their Redeemer. They were active in daily prayer- 
meetings, and were faithful in attendance. They concluded their first year 
with the determination to live three more similar to it, in order that they might 
be remembered for their spiritual assets, if for no other reason. 

i 157} 




Charlotte Adams 


Lorna Allen 


Paul Bergers 


Ada Brown 


Elva Burdette 


Rich'd Clingerman 


Nathan Adams 


Ruth Allen 


Wanda Billman 


Arthur Brown 


Roy Caffarella 


Albert Croutworst 


Dorcas Albright 


David Andrews 


Wesley Blachly 


Colleen Brown 


William Caldwell 


Marguerite Custer 


Phyllis Alexander 


George Andrews 


Ollie Black 


William Brown 


Rocco Cerrato 


Harold Darling 


Arthur Allen 


Grace Banham 


Paul Black 


Charles Bruce 


Philip Chatto 


Donald Darsch 


Eleanor Allen 


Paul Bartch 


Harold Blann 


John Bryner 


Kermit Clingerman 


Evelyn Davis 



{168> 



Jeanne Davis 
Jean Delp 

Audrey Dorman 
Robert Duke 



Dean DuVall 
Vera Easterly 
Harry Felter 
Jack Fields 



_eah Flinn 
Vivian Foltz 
Theona Fry 

Elinor Gardner 



Janice Giles 

Carlton Gleason 
John Golden 

George Goodwin 



Max Greene 

Merlva Guiliano 
Ruth Hane 

Mane Haselkamp 



John Hathaway 

Kenneth Hathaway 
Esther Haugh 

Ruth Haymaker 





> 



IP f* 



nrn 



A: fa* 




{ 159 > 




William Helm 


Wilda Huber 


Jennings James 


Florence Krier 


Robert Lutz 


Burdette Mason 


Edith Hensley 


Norman Huck 


Paul Kauffman 


Jane LeFever 


Edith Lyon 


Agnes Matheson 


Sue Hill 


Arthur Hughes 


Pauline Keith 


John Lepter 


Patricia MacMillan 


Joy Matthews 


Edwin Hiller 


Howard Hulse 


lames Kelley 


Myron Lineman 


Pris. MacPherson 


Victor Matthews 


Clarice Horton 


Doris Jackson 


Clifford Keys 


Elaine Lono 


Cedric Manley 


Martha Maybury 


1 id Howard 


Allen laspon 


slyn Klein 


If is Long 


Fly Martell 


Ciardner McCabe 



•[ 160 } 



Gladys McCully 
Regina McGill 
Roy McLam 

Robert McNeely 



Althea Merritts 
Kenneth Miller 

David Mitcheltree 
Richard Motz 



Dolores Mulgrew 
Janet Nagle 
Jean Naylor 

Phyllis Neiderhiser 



Harvey Nicholson 
Kay Parsons 

Phoebe Peoples 
Mary Plumb 



Margaret Primrose 
Wilma Racz 

Elaine Ransom 
Mary Remmy 



Al Rich 

Robert Risher 
Shirley Rose 

Kenneth Schubert 




i 161 } 




Wilma Young 
Paul Youngholm 
Lamar Zimmerman 



Not Pictured: 
John Dodge 
ElsworthMacAfee 



Nancy Simmons 
Herbert Sinden 
Esther Smeltzer 
Gordon Stanley 
Wesley Stinson 
Alton Swift 



Margaret Taylor 
George Teague 
James Thomas 
Edward Thompson 
William Tibbetts 
1 in i Tokarski 



Katherine Tyler 
Nelda Vidt 
Lynette Wagner 
Doris Walker 
Clifford Walton 
M<iry Waters 



Larry Watkins 
Aleda Watts 
Howard Wells 
Winnifred West 
Emily Wheeler 
Helen White 



Paul Willwerth 
Elsie Wray 
Kenneth Yoder 
Doris Young 
Dorothy Young 
Frank Young 



( 162 )• 




Third Row: T. Terrell, P. Coffee, F. Davison, M. (lark, C. Oney, D. Wise 

Sn-,n,l Hon-: B. Najarian, W. Ashman, I,. Potter, I). Jordan, P. Bowlby, M. Burke 

Front Row: I,. Hollett, N. Mellolt, M. O'Shaughnessy, H. Shindler, I.. Bailey, E. Brubaker. Martha Jones, Margarel .lone 



Not Pictured: Frank Bowers, David Cubie, Ralph Cushing, Mitsuko Eto, William Grayson, June Hamilton, Gilbert 
Hilgar, Juanita Kelley, Gordon Lewis, William Lusk, Don Mellert, Kimber Moulton, Erma Mullen. 
Phyllis Mundy, Miriam Park, Richard Phelps, Laura Pickens, Frances Rogers, Robert Spear, Rogena 
Thoma9, Douglas Alexander, Ross Crobbis, Duane Grimm, Edna FTodge, Doris Roberts 



SECOND SEMESTER 

STUDENTS 



i 163 } 



ACADEMY FACULTY 



MADELYN NEASE 

Principal 



JEAN MULLEN 

English; History 



STEPHEN NEASE 

English, Social Science 



MIRIAM PARK 

English 



WILBUR MULLEN 

Theology 



HELEN SULLIVAN 

French 



MARGARET ARDREY 

Mathematics 



HUBERT WILKINS 

Latin 




■1 L64 1 




David Abel 

Kenneth Alcorn 
Harold Antico 
Jean Bloye 
Ruth Brigham 



Larry Bunts 
Jack Burton 
Glenn Carlson 
Amy Chalmers 
Betty Clark 



Millie Desiardine 
Jerry Douds 
Pauline Elliott 
Lois Erwin 

Audrey Greenfield 



Arleen Guiles 
Byron Hardy 
Deane Hardy 
Esther Hicks 
John Holstead 



George Joudrey 
Resper Kelley 
Frank Kish 
Paul Lick 

Ruth Maywood 



Audrey McGuire 
William Melvin 
Lillian Myatt 
John Noftle 
Dorothy Paddle 



Eisner Pearsall 
Viola Peterson 
Irene Sanger 

Lawson Saunders 
Madelyn Shaw 



Phillip Storey 
Delia Whitters 
Mary Williams 
Esther Windsor 
Steven Wool 



ACADEMY STUDENTS 



{m} 



Dl RECTORY 



Ardrey, Margaret 
Babcock, Verner 
Cove, Edith 
Delp, George 
Dygoski, Louise 
Emmel, J. Robert 
Goodnow, Kent 
Goodnow, Edith 
Gould, J. Glenn 
Groves, Vernon 
Harris, Mary 
Lunn, Mervel 
McFarland, Elizabeth 
Mann, Edward 
Mullen, Jean 
Mullen, Wilbur 
Munro, Bertha 
Naylor, Jasper 
Nease, Madeline 
Owen, G. Frederick 
Park, Miriam 
Parsons, R. W. 
Rankin, Mary 
Rankin, Andrew 
Rothwell, Helen 
Rothwell, Mel-Thomas 
Shields, John 
Shrader, James 
Soteriades, Evangelos 
Spangenberg, Alice 
Young, Samuel 



Faculty 

6 Ebbet Ave., Wollaston, 

104 WilletSt., Wollaston, 

124 Phillips St., Wollaston, 

56 Bromfield St., Wollaston, 

185 Marlboro St., Wollaston, 

66 Kemper St., Wollaston, 

5 Ridgeway St., Wollaston, 

5 Ridgeway St., Wollaston, 

29 Dunbarton Rd., Wollaston, 

98 Phillips St., Wollaston, 

90 Franklin Ave., Wollaston, 

30 Ebbett Ave., Wollaston, 

104 Willow St., Wollaston, 

41 West Elm Ave., Wollaston, 

90 Winthrop Ave., Wollaston, 

90 Winthrop Ave., Wollaston, 

90 Franklin Ave., Wollaston, 

97 Willow St., Wollaston, 

92 Franklin Ave., Wollaston, 

99 Beach St., Wollaston, 

39 Rawson Rd., Wollaston, 

102 Hamden Cir., Wollaston, 

49 Florence St., Wollaston, 

49 Florence St., Wollaston, 

3 Ebbett Ave., Wollaston, 

3 Ebbett Ave., Wollaston, 

28 Newton Ave., Wollaston, 

90 Winthrop Ave., Wollaston, 

105 Willow Ave., Wollaston, 

81 Davis St., Wollaston, 

57 Ellington Rd., Wollaston, 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Abersold, George 
Adams, Charlotte 
Adams, Nathan 
Adams, R. Lewis 
Akers, Charles 
Akins, Kenneth 
Albright, Esther 
Albright, M. Eileen 
Aldndge, David 
Alexander, Phyllis 
Allen, Eleanor R 
Allen, Frances 



College 

A 

P. O. Box 302, Bellaire, Ohio 

705 Central Ave., Laurel, Del. 

126 Smithfield Rd., Woonsocket, R. I. 

10 Grandview Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 

2128 Howell Ave., Dayton, Ohio 

8 Pierpont St., Peabody, Mass. 

Elain, Pa. 

19 Kemston Rd., Melrose 76, Mass. 

138 Franklin Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 

1858 Aird Ave., Montreal, Quebec 

F.D. No. 1, Box 222, Claremont, N. hi. 

5 Randletl St., Wollaston, Mass. 



Allen, Leroy 
Allen, Lorna R. 

Allen, Ruth 
Allison, Donald Lee 
Anderson, Esther 65 
Andrews, David 
Andrews, George 
Andrews, Paul 
Ardrey, Alexander 
Ardrey, William 
Ashman, William 
Aslin, Doris 



18 School St., Lisbon Falls, Me. 

F.D. No. 1, Box 222, Claremont, N. H. 

18 School St., Lisbon Falls, Me. 

954 East Jefferson St., Butler, Pa. 

Richmond Hill Rd., New Canaan, Conn. 

445 Washington St., Royersford, Pa. 

445 Washington St., Royersford, Pa. 

445 Washington St., Royersford, Pa. 

201 Belgravia Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

6 Ebbett Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 

Box 295, R.F.D. No. 1, Manville, R. I. 

R.F.D. No. 1, Colrain, Mass. 



B 



Badders, Merna 
Bailey, Lois E. 
Balwit, Violet 
Banham, Edwin 
Banham, Grace 
Bartch, Paul 
Basham, Paul 
Bass, Ruth 
Bastedo, Myrtle 
Bauer, June 
Benton, Gwendolyn 
Benton, James 
Bergers, Paul 
Berry, Bruce 
Biscoe, Joseph 
Billman, Wanda 
Blachly, Wesley 
Black, Ollie 
Black, Paul 
Blann, Harold 



White Hall, Md. 

Colon, Nebr. 

2301 William St., Schenectady 6, N. Y. 

102 DePuyster Ave., Beacon, N. Y. 

102 DePuyster Ave., Beacon, N. Y. 

140 Willow St., Wollaston 70, Mass. 

711 Severn Ave., Eastport, Md. 

Chestnut St., East Longmeadow, Mass. 

R. R. No. 1, Woodstock, Ont. 

181 Union St., Lawrence, Mass. 

58 Pope St., North Quincy, Mass. 

58 Pope St., North Quincy, Mass. 

40 Arnold St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

612 Lincoln Ave. Saugus, Mass. 

805 Augusta Ave., Baltimore Md. 

318 West Cunningham St., Butler, Pa. 

44 Martin St., West Haven, Conn. 

4304 Southern Blvd., Youngstown 3, Ohio 

840 Beckford St., New Castle, Pa. 

225 Sudbrook Ave., Pikesville, Md. 



Blauser, Dorothy Route No. 1, Oil City, Pa. 
Boardman, Lothrop 84 Wendell Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 
Boggs, Mary Catherine 1016 N. 26th St., Camden, N. J. 

Booher, Elizabeth Danielson, Conn. 

Boozell, Bernice 314 West Grant St., Mercer, Pa. 

Bowlby, Paul 603 Broadway, Wellsville, Ohio 

Boyd, Laura Jane Circular Ave., Paoli, Pa. 
Brinker, Luke 222 South Franklin St., Allenlown, Pa. 

Brooks, Barbara Altona, N. Y. 

Brown, Ada 210 Elm St., Woodstock, N. B 

Brown, Arthur Jerome, Pa. 

Brown, Colleen Waterville, Vt. 

Brown, Evelyn 57 Main St., Owego, N. Y. 

Brown, H. Weston 57 Main St., Owego, N. Y. 

Brown, Marilyn Bruin, Pa. 



•( 16C } 



Brown, Virginia 1644 Sixth Ave., Terre Haute, Ind. 

Brown, William Brookside, N. J. 

Brubaker, Evelyn Route No. 1, Beloit, Ohio 

Bruce, Charles 2208 Hamill Ave., Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Bruce, Constance 18 Orford St., Lowell, Mass. 

Bryner, John R.D. No. 1, Claysville, Pa. 

Bula, Ronald 101 North Alton Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Burdett, Mabel 89 Bicknell St., Quincy, Mass. 

Burdette, Elva Monrovia, Md. 

Burke, Marvin 315 East Cambridge St., Alliance, Ohio 

Bush, Warren 323 Farrington St., Quincy, Mass. 
Butterworth, Ruth 

Woodland Ave., R.D. No. 2, Norristown, Pa. 



Carfarella, LeRoy 
Caldwell, William 
Campbell, Ernest 
Carlson, Marcia 
Carnahan, Roy 
Cate, Marguerite 
Cerrato, Rocco 
Chatto, Philip 
Christensen, Betty Ruth 
Christensen, Peggy 
Church, Olive 
Clark, Paul 
Clemons, Doris 
Clemons, Luella 
Clifton, Martha 
Clingerman, Kermit 
Clingerman, Richard 
Coffee, Patrick 
Coffee, Vivian 
Coffin, Mary 
Colby, Esther 
Coller, Charles 
Congalton, Margaret 
Cook, Francis 
Cornell, May 
Cove, Iris 
Cowles, Robert 
Cowles, Elizabeth 
Crites, Jay 
Cross, Thora 
Croutworst, Albert 
Crutcher, Lowell 
Cubie, David 
Curry, Vernon 
Cushing, Ralph 
Custer, Marguerite 



5 Brown Ter., Maiden, Mass. 

99 Francis Ave., Pawtucket, R. I. 

R.D. No. 2, Portersville, Pa. 

102 06 Remington St., Jamaica, N. Y. 

Route No. 1, Kent, Ohio 

2710 West 5th St., Grand Island, Nebr. 

65 Burlington Ave., Bridgeton, N. J. 

R. No. 6, Augusta, Me. 

Altona, N. Y. 

Altona, N. Y. 

Box 16, Suffield, Ohio 

423 East First St., Uhrichsville, Ohio 

Sandy Creek, N. Y. 

Sandy Creek, N. Y. 

216 Olmsted Dr., Middletown, Pa. 

R.D. No. 1, Poland, Ohio 

R.D. No. 1, Poland, Ohio 

P. O. Box 23, Kendall, Fla. 

P. O. Box 23, Kendall, Fla. 

2288— 7th St., Akron 14, Ohio 

R.F.D. No. 2, 90 Rd., Ashtabula, Ohio 

6 Apthorp St., Wollaston, Mass. 

R.D. No. 4, Millvale, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Parkerford, Pa. 

Nichols, N. Y. 

Wilbraham Academy, Wilbraham, Mass. 

1 Blizzard St., Waverly, N. Y. 

1 Blizzard St., Waverly, N. Y. 

186 Union Ave., Framingham, Mass. 

37 Church St., Weston, Ont. 

59 Adams St., Quincy, Mass. 

Box 264, R.D. No. 2, Dover, N. J. 

8 Taft Ave., Haverhill, Mass. 

134 Waterston Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 

30 Walnut St., North Quincy, Mass. 

16 Osborne St., Johnstown, Pa. 



Davis, Evelyn 
Davis, Leland 
Davis, Jeanne 
Davison, Fred 
Dell, Jack 
Delp, Jean 
Dickinson, Harriett 
Dickinson, Margaret 
Dittrich, Betty 
Dittrich, Gloria 
Dixon, Esther 
Dixon, J. C. 
Dodge, Helen 
Dodge, John 
Domingues, Frank 
Dorman, Audrey 
Dorothy, Jean 
Dorsett, Frances 
Douglas, Bonnie 
Douglas, Pauline 
Doverspike, Viola 
Duke, Robert 
DuVall, Dale 
DuVall, Dean 



Easterly, Vera 
Eby, James 
Eby, Paul 
Emery, Eleanor 
Emery, Marilyn 
Eto, Mitsuko 
Ewing, Mary Jane 



496 White St., Springfield, Mass. 

921 Bradshaw Ave., E. Liverpool, Ohio 

Harwick, Vt. 

Bass River, Col. Co., N. S. 

422 Pharr Rd., Decatur, Ga. 

645 N. 16th St., Allentown, Pa. 

Venice Center, N. Y. 

Venice Center, N. Y. 

231 Pennsylvania Ave., Paterson, N. J. 

231 Pennsylvania Ave., Paterson, N. J. 

1830 4th St., New Brighton, Pa. 

922-1 80th St., Hammond, Ind. 

385 W. Maryland Ave., Sebring, Ohio 

136 Willow St., Wollaston, Mass. 

95 Jenney St., New Bedford, Mass. 

E. 1st, Waterford, Pa. 

Childwold, N. Y. 

Minden, W. Va. 

4 Genesee Ave., Binghamton, N. Y. 

4 Genesee Ave., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Mayport, Pa., R. No. 3 

52 Albertina St., Quincy, Mass. 

58 Woodbine St., Wollaston, Mass. 

Canfield, Ohio, R. D. No. 2 



Chaffee, N. Y 

493 N.W. 41 St., Miami, Fla 

15C Waterston Ave., Wollaston, Mass 

25 Franklin St., Warren, Pa 

25 Franklin St., Warren, Pa 

1413 State Rd., Seabrook, N. J 

R.F.D. No. 1, Polk, Pa 



150 Elmwood Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 
1619 E. Joppa Rd., Towson, Md. 



Felter, Harry 
Fields, Jack 
Flemming, Floyd 

153 Pine St., Carleton Ward, Fredericton, N. B. 
Flinn, Leah R.D. No. 1 , Kent, Ohio 

Foltz, Vivian Green St., Fruitland, Md. 

Fry, Theona 164 Seeley Ave., Syracuse 5, N. Y. 



Dafforn, Maxine 430 W. State St., Fort Wayne 7, Ind. 

Darsch, Donald 5302 Elsrode Ave., Baltimore, Md. 



Galbraith, Dale 
Gardiner, Claudine 
Gardner, Elinor 
Giles, Janice 
Giuliano, Merlva 
Gleason, Carlton 
Gleason, Joyce 
Golden, John 
Goodnow, Robert 
Goodwin, George 



Box 372, McDonald, Ohio 

112 Evergreen St., DuBois, Pa. 

Island Pond, Vt. 

Route 3, Skowhegan, Me. 

146 Main St., Norwalk, Conn. 

11 Landers Rd., Wollaston, Mass. 

11 Landers Rd., Wollaston, Mass. 

1609-19th St., S.E., Washington, D. C. 

5 Ridgeway St., Wollaston, Mass. 

40 Phillips Ave., Norwood, Mass. 



{ 1(37 > 



Goresh, John 167 Van Buren St., Cone, Pa. 

Gracey, Betty Robertsdale, Pa. 

Grant, Bertram 22 Anderson St., Portland, Me. 

Gray, Paul 63 S. Main St., Uxbridge, Mass. 
Grayson, William R. 3, Fox $ Middletown Rds., Media, Pa. 

Greene, Barbara 8 Cutter Ave., W. Somerville, Mass. 

Greene, Virginia 625-25th St., S. Arlington, Va. 

Greene, Max 14418 St. Claire, Cleveland, Ohio 

Greenhalgh, John 809 Stevens St., Lowell, Mass. 



Hale, Elizabeth 
Hall, Eldon 
Hall, Mariorie 
Hamilton, June 
Hane, Bernice 
Hane, Ruth 
Haner, Everett 
Harding, Ruth 
Hardy, Deane 
Hardy, Verna 
Harr, Carl 
Harris, John 
Harris, Mary Belle 
Harris, Paul 
Harvey, Pnscilla 
Haselkamp, Marie 
Hathaway, Dudley 
Hathaway, John 
Hathaway, Kenneth 
Haugh, Esther 
Hawk, Grace 
Hawk, Richard 
Haylett, Lois 
Haymaker, Ruth 
Haynes, Fred 
Haywood, Ada 
Hazelton, Daniel 
Helm, William 
Hensley, Edith 



H 

115 N. Mueller, Box 265, Bethan, Okla. 

Route No. 2, Payette, Ida. 

8 Notre Dame St., Fort Edward, N. Y. 

60 Willet St., Wollaston, Mass. 

Box 36, City Mills, Mass. 

Box 36, City Mills, Mass. 

60 Roxborough St., W., Toronto, Ont. 



Bridgewater, Me. 

39 California Ave., W. Quincy, Mass. 

5706 Moore St., Baltimore 25, Md. 

Alum Bank, Pa. 

341 S. Lyman St., Wadsworth, Ohio 

402 South Ave., Bradford, Pa. 

262 Ohio Ave., Providence, R. I. 

15 John's Ave., Lynn, Mass. 

Winterport, Me. 

108 Pierce St., New Bedford, Mass. 

Brunswick Rd., Gardiner, Me. 

108 Pierce St., New Bedford, Mass. 

536 E. High St., Uhnchsville, Ohio 

26 Broad St., Johnson City, N. Y. 

26 Broad St., Johnson City, N. Y. 

Polk, R. D. No. 2, Pa. 

Box 155, Stow, Ohio 

Hillside Ave., Mine Hill, Dover, N. J. 

31 Abington St., Worcester, Mass. 

39 California Ave., W. Quincy, Mass. 

1 North St. PL, Augusta, Me. 

Shenandoah, Va, 



Herrschaft, Patricia 

8167 Woodhaven Blvd., Glendale 27, N. Y. 
Hewgill, Murray R.R. 1, Clarksburg, Ont. 

Hickerson, Opal 402 Adena St., N. Canton, Ohio 

Hill, Susan General Del., Tuscarawas, Ohio 

Hilgar, Arthur West Sunbury, Pa. 

Hiller, Edwin Diamond Hill Rd., Box 336, Manville, R. I. 
Hodges, Barbara 605-55th St., S.E., Charleston 4, W. Va. 



Hollett, A. Louise 
Horton, Clarice 
Horlon, Ellis 
Horton, Ruth 
Hoshmatian, Cora 
Howard, Ivah 
Huber, Wilda 
Huck, Norman 



26 Fairview Ave., Saugus, Mass. 

Broad Top, Pa. 

123 Eeach St., Wollaston, Mass. 

123 Beach St., Wollaston, Mass. 

120 Durant St., Lowell, Mass. 

Union, Me. 

360 Union Ave., Lynbrook, N. Y. 

104 Main St., N. Warren, Pa. 



Hughes, Arthur 
Hulse, Howard 
Huskin, Rosalee 



Jackson, Doris 
Jackson, Rogene 
James, William 
James, Jennings 

Box 
Jaspon, Allan 
Johnston, Betty 
Jones, DeRand 
Jones, Floyd 
Jones, Madelyn 
Jones, Margaret 
Jones, Martha 
Jones, Robert 
Jones, Theda 
Jones, Winnifred 
Jordan, Donald 
Joyce, Harland 



Box 97, Brookfield, Ohio 
1864 Lisbon St., E. Liverpool, Ohio 
331 College Ave., Grove City, Pa. 



J 
237 Ridgeway Ave., Rochester 13, N. Y. 
Waterville, Vt. 
354 Pmewood Ave., Toledo, Ohio 

4214 Owens Station, Charleston, W. Va. 

30 Squanto Rd., Quincy, Mass. 

509 Jackson St., Monongahela, Pa. 

701 E. Lincoln Way, Lisbon, Ohio 

42 Hillcrest St., Auburn, Me. 

Route No. 1, Bergholz, Ohio 

371 Kenna Dr., S. Charleston, W. Va. 

371 Kenna Dr., S. Charleston, W. Va. 

2407 Arunah Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

2082 W. Main St., Norristown, Pa. 

42 Hillcrest St., Auburn, Me. 

Livermore Falls, Me. 

182 Union St., Franklin, Mass. 



Karker, Louise 164 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 

Karker, Oliver 164 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 

Kauffman, Elmer 134 Grand View Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 

Kauffman, Paul 942 Oak St., Allentown, Pa. 
Keffer, Anna Mae 135 12th St., N.E., New Phila., Ohio 
Keith, Pauline 

R.D. No. 2, Box 13, Mounty Hill, Portage, Pa. 

Kelley, Juanita 1009 Pierce Ave., Toronto, Ohio 

Kelley, James 1009 Pierce Ave., Toronto, Ohio 

Kerstetter, Iris R.D. No. 2, Sunbury, Pa 

Keys, Clifford R.D. No. 1, Box 346, Roanoke, Va 

Kinney, Alverda 227 Overdale St., Morgantown, W. Va 

Kirkland, Paul 52 Westminster St., Springfield, Mass 

Kish, Frank Nolans Point, Lake Hopatcong, N. J 

Kish, Marion Nolans Point, Lake Hopatcong, N. J 

Klein, Evelyn Quarters 73A, Fort Devens, Mass 

Kner, Florence 314 Skiff St., Hamden, Conn 



Lawhead, Alvin 
Lechner, Mary 
Lefever, Jane 
Lemon, Margaret 
Leonard, Ruth 
Lepter, John 
Lewis, Dwight 
Lewis, Margaret 
Lewis, Richard 
Libby, Evelyn 
Lineman, Myron 



R.D. No. 1, Alum Bank, Pa. 

96 Henry St., N. Quincy 71, Mass. 

620 N. Christian St., Lancaster, Pa. 

R. R. No. 2, Annan, Ont. 

R.F.D. No. 1A, Auburn, Me. 

138 Walnut St., Palerson, N. J. 

245 Newbury Ave. 

43 Farrar Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

39 Rawson Rd., Quincy, Mass. 

1803 Washington Ave., Portland, Me. 

200 N. Mam St., Bolivar, N. Y. 



-{ 168 }• 



Lingford, Doris St. Paul, Neb. 

Lockhart, Paul 2877 Morrison St., Akron 12, Ohio 

Long, Elaine 305 Euclid Ave., Trenton 9, N. J. 

Long, Iris Marshallville, Ohio 

Lynn, Sylvia East Douglas, Mass. 

Lusk, Phoebe 2601 -9th Ave., Oakland 6, Calif. 

Lusk, William 2601-9th Ave., Oakland 6, Calif. 

Lutton, William 320 Euclid St., Corry, Pa. 

Lutz, Robert 76 Birchbrow Ave., N. Weymouth, Mass. 

Lyon, Edith 22 Catherire St., Lynbrook, L. I., N. Y. 



Mc 

286 East St., E. Walpole, Mass. 

183 Orchard St., New Bedford, Mass. 

70 Pleasant St., Quincy, Mass. 

Box 147, Springboro, Pa. 

1813 Albany St., Schenectady, N. Y. 

1813 Albany St., Schenectady, N. Y. 

1813 Albany St., Schenectady, N. Y. 

129 Green St., Fair Haven, Mass. 

42 Davis St., Wollaston, Mass. 

R.D. No. 2, Homer City, Pa. 

11 Rhodes Ave., Collingdale, Pa. 

15 N. Main St., Ambler, Pa. 



MacCallum, Doris 

MacKay, William 

MacLeod, Myrtle 

MacMillan, Patricia 

MacPherson, Eunice 

MacPherson, Priscilla 

MacPherson, Walter 

McAfee, Ellsworth 

McCabe, Gardner 

McCully, Gladys 

McElhenny, Anna 

McFarland, Elizabeth 

McGill, Regina 1006 Eleventh St., New Philadelphia, O. 



McGuire, Audrey 
Mcllwain, Arthur 
McKenney, Pearl 
McLain, Neale 
McLain, Roy 
McNeely, Robert 



Malony, Gordon 
Manley, Cedric 
Marta, Helen 
Martell, Ely 
Mason, Burdette 
Mason, Myrtle 
Matheson, Agnes 
Matthews, Joy 
Matthews, Victor 
Maybury, Calvin 
Maybury, Martha 
Meeker, Tressa 
Mellott, Naomi 



M.C. No. 28, Warren, Ohio 

385 Bridge Ave., Windsor, Ont. 

255 Grove St., Bangor, Me. 

45 Randlett St., Wollaston, Mass. 

706 Elm St., Endicott, N. Y. 

180 Palmer St., Norwich, Conn. 



M 

R. No. 3, Cumberland, Md. 

Wolcott, Vt. 

3305 Lincoln Ave., Shadyside, Ohio 

731 Lakeview Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

70 Pleasant St., Quincy, Mass. 

288 Prospect St., Cambridge, Mass. 

48 Cummings Ave., Quincy 70, Mass. 

39 Mt. Joy Ave., Freeport, N. Y. 

39 Mt. Joy Ave., Freeport, N. Y. 

82 Chandler St., W. Somerville, Mass. 

82 Chandler St., W. Somerville, Mass. 

249 Dodge Ave., E. Haven, Conn. 

R. No. 1, Needmore, Pa. 



Melnick, Mary Pennsville-Auburn Rd., Deep Water, N. J. 



Merchant, Violet 
Merritts, Althea 
Miller, Kenneth 
Mink, Juanita 
Mitchell, Florence 
Mitcheltree, David 
Mobberly, Bernadine 



14 Lincoln Ave., Warren, Pa. 

R. R. No. 2, Berne, Ind. 

440 Washington Ave., Beacon, N. Y. 

445 Washington St., Royersford, Pa. 

R.F.D. No. 2, Bethel, Conn. 

480 Ellsworth St., Sharon, Pa. 



Moore, Lawrence 

134 Old Colony Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 
Moore, Madeline 

134 Old Colony Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 
5421 N. Lawrence St., Philadelphia 20, Pa. 
Box 156, Ciales, Puerto Rico 
190 Quincy Ave., E. Braintree, Mass. 
242 Hawley St., Rochester, N. Y. 
519 Alice St., Youngstown, Ohio 
14301 Ardenall Ave., Cleveland, O. 
Meductic, N. B., Canada 
90 Winthrop Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 
Box 254, Scottdale, Pa. 
363 Main St., Toronto, Ont. 



Moore, Paul 
Morales, Carmen 
Mortensen, Robert 
Motz, Richard 
Mundy, Phyllis 
Mulgrew, Dolores 
Mullen, Laurence 
Mullen, Wilbur 
Musnug, Vivian 
Muxworthy, Charles 



Nagle, Janet 
Najarian, Berge 
Naylor, Beulah 
Naylor, Beatrice 
Neal, Paul 
Nease, Christine 
Nease, Stephen 
Neiderhiser, Phyllis 
Newton, Naomi 
Nicholson, Harvey 



O'Brien, Lawrence 
Olson, Howard 
Oney, Charles 
Otis, Florence 



N 



211 Rhodes Ave., Collingdale, Pa. 

C. M. S. Hospital, Nablus, Palestine 

35 Kimball St., Richmond, Me. 

97 Willow St., Wollaston 70, Mass. 

4 Park St., Saugus, Mass. 

92 Franklin Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 

92 Franklin Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 

412 N. Center St., Gove City, Pa. 

802 North St., Endicott, N. Y. 

West Alexander, Pa. 



7 Green St 
34 Kimball Beach Rd. 



Monson, Mass. 
Hingham, Mass. 
158 Sixth St., Dunbar, W. Va. 
45 Fuller St., Everett, Mass. 



Palmer, Becky 916 Buckeye St., Warren, Ohio 

Park, Miriam 

Box 161, Washington Blvd., Bellmore, L. I., N. Y. 
Parker, Amelia 287 W. Academy St., Hughesville, Pa. 



15 Cleveland Ave., Binghamton, N. Y 

{ Hi!) > 



Parry, Harold 
Patton, Jay 
Pennington, Luther 
Peoples, Phoebe 
Petitt, Elva 
Phelps, Richard 
Pickens, Laura 
Pinkerton, Franklin 
Plant, Betty 
Plant, Irene 
Plumb, Grace 
Plumb, Mary 
Potter, Lawrence 
Primrose, Margaret 



28 Ebbett Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 

73 Franklin Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 

1378 Third St., Rensselaer, N. Y. 

457 Main St., Beacon, N. Y. 

637 Norway Ave., Trenton, N. J. 

726 Union, S.W., Warren, Ohio 

1 57 N. Liberty St., Waynesburg, Pa. 

17 West 3d St., Media, Pa. 

240 School Ave., Jerome, Pa. 

240 School Ave., Jerome, Pa. 

R. No. 2, Uniontown, Ohio 

R. No. 2, Uniontown, Ohio 

Sabattus, Me. 

Box. No. 42, Primrose, Neb. 



Racz, Wilma 101 E. 87 St., New York City 28, N. Y. 

Ransom, Elaine Saranac Lake, R.F.D. No. 1, N. Y. 

Reed, Donald 314 Ridgeway Ave., E. Liverpool, Ohio 

Remmy, Mary 51 Lancaster Rd., Marietta, Ohio 

Retter, Donald 21 Stanley St., S. Portland, Me. 

Rich, Albert Livermore Falls, Me. 

Risher, Robert R.D. No. 1, Collegeville, Pa. 

Rogers, Frances 198 E. North St., Ilion, N. Y. 

Romig, William 223 W. Seventh St., Uhrichsville, Ohio 

Russell, Lucy 1325 N. Hamlin Dr., Ashtabula, Ohio 

Ryans, Earl Wadsworth Rd., Reading, Mass. 



Schindler, Helen 
Schrag, Elmer 
Scott, John 
Seitz, Arlene 
Shedd, Dorothy 
Shellenberger, Vivia 
Shields, John 
Shope, Patsy 
Shuman, Thelma 
Simmons, Nancy 1E 
Sinden, Herbert 
Smeltzer, Esther 
Smith, Eleanor 230 
Smith, Elizabeth 
Smith, Janet 
Smith, Keith 
Snyder, Frederick 
Spear, Robert 
Stairs, Conard 
Stanley, Gordon 
Staples, Chester 
Steiner, Helen 
Stevens, Faith 
Stiefel, Albert 
Stinson, Wesley 
Storms, Victor 
Stotler, Mary Alice 
Sturtevant, Leroy 
Sullivan, Kenneth 
Swenk, Alma 
Swift, Alton 



449 Berkshire Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

7331 S. Peoria St., Chicago, III. 

M.C. No. 28, Warren, Ohio 

Box 95, West Point, Pa. 

95 Carlisle St., E. Chelmsford, Mass. 

206 N. Irvine St., Warren, Pa. 

15 Ridgeway St., Wollaston, Mass. 

Route No. 1, Hummelstown, Pa. 

834 Melrose Ave., Trenton 9, N. J. 

\ l/ 2 Northampton St., Worcester, Mass. 

320 W. 4th St., Uhrichsville, Ohio 

125 N. Walnut St., Ravenna, Ohio 

M W. Filbert St., E. Rochester, N. Y. 

19 Bunker Ave., Fairfield, Me. 

Route 1, Belle Vernon, Pa. 

19 Bunker Ave., Fairfield, Me. 

406 Fulton St., Hanover, Pa. 

Box 113, Titusville, Fla. 

Meductic, N. B., Canada 

Winter Harbor, Me. 

North Brooklin, Me. 

900 Stratford Ave., Earberton, Ohio 

Hinckley, Me. 

214 Adams St, Waltham 54, Mass. 

West River Rd, Uxbridge, Mass. 

21 West St, Everett, Mass. 

Boswell, Pa. 

Milo, Me. 

Havelock, Digby Co, N. B, Canada 

123 Rhodes Ave, Collingdale, Pa. 

78 Main St, Fairfield, Me. 



Taylor, Donald 15 Riverside Dr., N. Reading, Mass. 

Taylor, Margaret 216 James St, Newport, Del. 

Taylor, William 15 Orchard St, Wharton, N. J. 

Teague, George Waldoboro, Me. 
Teal, Eloise 1579 Martin Ave, Birmingham 8, Ala. 

Terrell, Thomas 37 Jedburgh Rd, Toronto, Ont. 

Thomas, David 507 St. Paul St, Burlington, Vt. 

Thomas, James 1379 N.W. 55th Ter, Miami, Fla. 



Thomas, Rogena 
Thompson, Edward 
Thurber, Mariorie 
Tibbetts, William 
Tingley, Treva 
Tokarski, Laura 
Turkington, Marion 
Turner, Bettie Lee 
Turpel, Jennie 
Tustin, Mabel 
Tyler, Katherine 



Umstead, Grace 
Utter, Robert 



Van Dressar, Irene 
Vidt, Nelda 



Wagner, Lynette 
Walker, Doris 
Walton, Clifford 
Ward, Audrey 
Waters, Mary 
Watkins, Lawrence 
Watts, Aleda 
Weaver, Erlaine 
Weaver, Mary 
Webster, Louise 
Weller, Harold 
Wells, Howard 
West, Margie 
West, Winifred 
Wheeler, Emily 
Wheeler, Natalie 
Whetstone, Cornelii 
White, Grace 
White, Helen 
Williams, Oliver 
Williams, Roger 
Willwerth, Paul 
Wilson, Ruth 
Winsor, James 
Wise, Delbert 
Witmer, Elaine 
Wood, Jean 
Woodward, Irma 
Wool, Steven 
Wray, Elsie 



42 Davis St., Wollaston, Mass. 

119 W. Diamond St., Butler, Pa. 

767 Cottage St, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Sedgwick, Me. 

Hopewell Hill, N. B, Canada 

R.F.D, Scarboro, Me. 

23 Orchard St., Manchester, Conn. 

Leesburg, Va. 

62 State St, New Bedford, Mass. 

60 Lemoyne Ave, Washington, Pa. 

Vermontville, N. Y. 

U 

450 Washington St, Rogersford, Pa. 
Berkshire Rd, Wharton, N. J. 



49 Walton St, Alexandria Bay, N. Y. 
644 Butler St, Etna, Pa. 

W 

Box 118, East Wilton, Me. 

1008 S. Rosina Ave, Somerset, Pa. 

119 Pine St, S. Portland, Me. 

R. R. No. 3, Dundas, Ont. 

Ridge Rd, M. C. 28, Warren, Ohio 

M. C. 28, Warren, Ohio 

Forest, N. Y. 

405 Vienna Ave, Niles, Ohio 

Blanchard, Pa. 

51 Hale St, Beverly, Mass. 

335 E. Glen Ave, Syracuse, N. Y. 

R.F.D. No. 1, Plattsburg, N. Y. 

1539 E. 8th St, Tulsa, Okla. 

2312 Mapleton Ave, Boulder, Colo. 

Box 209, E. Douglas, Mass. 

10 N. Main St, Newmarket, N. H. 

5 73 Fenno St, Wollaston, Mass. 

181 Adams St, Quincy, Mass. 

Johnsen St, Salisbury, Md. 

Sandy Creek, N. Y. 

11038 Artesian Ave, Chicago, III. 

P. O. Box 182, Union City, Pa. 

Chazy, N. Y. 

385 Bridge Ave, Windsor, Ont. 

404 Conn. St, Buffalo 13, N. Y. 

Reamstown, Pa. 

273 Huron St, Barberton, Ohio 

5 Randlett St, Wollaston, Mass. 

20 Latham Ct, Burlington, Vt. 

22 Lilley St, Manchester, Conn. 



Yamada, Paul 
Yoder, Kenneth 



Pepeecker, Hawaii 
276 W. Nedro Ave, Philadelphia, Pa. 



{ 1 70 > 



Young, Doris 1579 Belvois Blvd., S. Euclid, Ohio 

Young, Dorothy 1579 Belvois Blvd., S. Euclid, Ohio 

Young, Frank 4635 Anderson Rd., S. Euclid, Ohio 

Young, Wilma 4635 Anderson Rd., S. Euclid, Ohio 

Youngholm, Paul 165 Whitwell St., Quincy, Mass. 



Hodge, Edna 
Holstead, John 



Joudrey, George 



268 McRoberts Ave., Toronto, Ont. 
157' 2 Coleman Ave., Toronto, Ont. 



Livermore Falls, Me. 



Zimmerman, Lamar 
Zimmerman, Marvin 



17 S. Chestnut St., Mt. Carmel, Pa. 
76 Young St., Quincy, Mass. 



Kelley, Resper 



K 



41 Chase St., Beverly, Mass. 



ACADEMY 



Lick, Paul 



17 Monroe St., Freemansburg, Pa. 



Abel, David 
Albright, Howard 
Alcorn, Kenneth 
Alexander, Douglas 
Allen, Arthur 
Antico, Harold 



Bloye, Jean 
Brigham, Ruth 
Bunts, Lawrence 
Burton, John 



101 N. Alton Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 

19 Keniston Rd., Melrose 76, Mass. 

101 Botsford St., Moncton, N. B. 

1858 Aird Ave., Montreal, Que. 

67 Temple St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

132 Prospect St., Jamestown, N. Y. 



B 

342 Main St., Toronto, Ont. 

289 Pleasant St. Belmont, Mass. 

35 Donald St., Johnson City, N. Y. 

342 Webster Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



Maywood, Ruth 
McNee, William 
Melvin, William 
Myatt, Lillian 



Nobles, Ralph 
Noftle, John 



M 

680 Indian Rd., Toronto, Ont. 

110 Porter St., Somerville, Mass. 

90 Maple St., Moncton, N. B. 

Oxford, N. S. 

N 

99 Marlboro St., Wollaston, Mass. 
1468 Eastern Ave., Maiden, Mass. 



O'Shaughnessy, Mary-Kipp Grumman Ave., Norwalk, Conn. 



Carlson, Glenn 
Carpenter, Ray 
Chalmers, Amy 
Clark, Betty 



Desjardine, Millie 
Dinsmore, Raymond 
Douds, Jerry 



3456 W. 44 St., Cleveland, Ohio 

26 Payson St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

48 Criscoe St., Toronto, Ont. 

5 E. Main, Brocton, N. Y. 



D 

Dashwood, Ont. 

8 Eastern Ave., Waterville, Me. 

E. N. C, Wollaston, Mass. 



Paddle, Dorothy 
Parsons, Louise 
Pearsall, Eisner 
Peterson, Viola 
Plant, Albert 



Roberts, Doris 



126 Branstone Rd., Toronto, Ont. 

94 Winham St., Danvers, Mass. 

112 S. Park Ave., Rockville Center, N. Y. 

56 Dexter Rd., Melrose, Mass. 

69 Copley St., Wollaston, Mass. 



Twillingate, Newfoundland 



Elliott, Pauline 
Erwin, Lois 



Greenfield, Audrey 
Grimm, Duane 
Guiles, Arleen 



Hardy, Byron 
Hicks, Esther 



138 Franklin Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 
Waterville, Vt. 



128 Wiltshire Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

453 Iowa, Warren, Ohio 

64 Turner St., Waltham, Mass. 

H 

Alberton, P. E. I. 
24 Cornell St., Lowell, Mass. 



Sanger, Irene 
Saunders, Lawson 
Schubert, Kenneth 
Shaw, Madelyn 
Smith, Byron 
Snell, Jean 
Storey, Phillip 



Whitters, Delia 
Williams, Mary 
Windsor, Esther 



301 Lake St., Waltham, Mass. 

848 Barker St., South Devon, N. B. 

1135 Linden St., Allentown, Pa. 

Route 2, Lisbon Falls, Me. 

230' 2 W. Filbert St., E. Rochester, N. Y. 

49A Porter St., Somerville, Mass. 

265 Putnam Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

W 

Cedar Ave., Sussex, N. B. 
364 W. Philadelphia St., York, Pa. 
147 W. Patrick St., Frederick, Md. 



{171} 



(Ehurrlj Afcuer 




ItHtttg 



The greatest asset of Eastern Nazarene College is its 
endowment by the various churches on the Eastern Educational 
Zone. And even as the college is dependent largely upon the 
Church for its maintenance, so the entire zone determines its pulse 
by the calibre of the product we are turning out from year to year, 
and also to the degree that our graduates become successful in their 
respective professions. And likewise, through the college annual, 
our educational zone evaluates to some degree, the spirit of faith 
and advancement, and the general tone which prevails on our campus. 

The success of this annual is due largely to the co-opera- 
tion and practical response of the pastors and friends of many churches, 
who understand the value and importance of our church school. The 
next few pages represent a measure of work and thoughtfulness 
which are a necessity to the realization of this college annual,- and 
also indicate the strength of the bond of unity which exists between 
the constituency and the college. 

The 1947 Nautilus Staff takes this opportunity to express 
our thanks to our many church friends. We trust that your investment 
in this edition will bring effective results in your church develop- 
ment. 



W.F.M .S. Convention 

and District Assembly 
April *8 to May 4, 1947 



Sunday School Convention 

and Preachers Meeting 

September 16 to 18, 1947 



AKRON DISTRICT 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Rev. O. L. Benedum, District Superintendent 



G 



/•;. N. C. Trustees 
(). L. BENEDUM 
II. B. MACRORY 
E. S. CARMAN 
E. A. PEFFER 



L 



O 



R 



y 



C. I?. WOOD 

District Secretary 
CHARLES C. HANKS 

District Treasurer 
MRS. 1). I). PALMER 

W. F. M. S. President 
JOHN R. SOLOKY 

X. V. I'. S. District President 



Advisory Hoard 
CHARLES C. HANKS 
1). I). PALMER 
K. S. CARMAN 
S. S. BENNETT 



( lamp Meeting 
Sebring ( amp Grounds 
Sebring, Ohio 
August 14 to 24, I !»!•? 



N.V.l'.S. Convention 
October 23 to 25, 1947 



{174) 



garbing Cfjrigt 







/// the Community . . . 

SOUTH EUCLID NAZARENE CHAPEL 

4477 Rushton Road South Euclid 21 
Ohio 



Pastor 
REV. J. DONALD FREESE 

10-21 East 148th Street 

Cleveland 10, Ohio 

Phones: GL. Hiiii, EV. 1100 



"Holiness Unto the Lord" 




CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 


Com pi intents of . . . 


Wolf Run, Ohio 




Parsonage: Bergholz, Ohio Phone 31-W 


FIRST CHURCH 
OF THE NAZARENE 


"A Soul-Winning Church" 


N. Howard St. W. Tallmadge Ave. 




(North Hill) Akron, Ohio 


VICTORY 




THRU 


SQ 


CHRIST 


C. D. TAYLOR 




Pastor 


MINNIE <i. WIANDT Pastor 





<175} 



Com pli incuts of 

The First Church 

of the 

Nazarene 

Hayden Avenue at Claiborne Road 
EAST CLEVELAND, OHIO 

EDWARD K. HARDY 
Minister 



WARREN BOLINDALE CHURCH is 

E — verlastingly 
N — on complainingly 
C — ooperative 
With Our College 




JOHN" R. DONLEY, Minister 
Church of the Nazarene 

Ridge Road, S.E. 
Warren, ()lii<> 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Satin Street 
Jefferson, Ohio 



S. S. Superintendent 
N. V. P. S. President 
W. /■'. M. S. President 



A. M. Gechneaur 

Mary Welser 

Grace l'ark 



'Draw nigh to God, and he 
will draw nigh to you" 



REV. ('. ADRIAN WAY 

East Satin Street 

Telephone "21? 



i 176 } 



E. W. MARTIN, Minister 

II. ('. LOUCKS, Assistant 

In charge of music 



FIRST 



CHURCH 



OF THE 



NAZARENE 

EAST LIVERPOOL, OHIO 



GREETINGS 
AND 

ASSURANCE OF 
WHOLE-HEARTED 
SUPPORT TO E.N.C. 



"Respect for the past — progress for the present — vision for the future' 



{177}- 



COMPLIMENTS OF 




FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Youngstown, Ohio 

II. (i. PURKHISER, Minister 
VKSY STEMM, Minister of Music 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

608 East Second Street 
Salem, Ohio 





S 


unday 


Services 






Church School 








9 : 15 


AM 


Morning Worship 








11:00 


AM 


N. V. P. S. 








c>a:> 


I'M 


Gospel Hour 




Wedn 


esday 


7 :.'!<) 


I'M 


Miil-ucck Prayer 


S< 


■ivicc 




7 : 15 


I'M 



) our Church Home Away from Home 

E. M. PARKS, Pastor 

(i(is Easl Second Sired 

Phone 5120 



''The Friendly Church with the Christian Welcome' 




l ongratulations from 

EAST PALESTINE, OHIO 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

REV. o. M. COX 

.1/ i ni. tii r 






{178) 



Church of the Nazarene 

North Dawson, near First 
Uhrichsville, Ohio 

WITH COMPLIMENTS 

TO THE CLASS OF 1947 

CLARENCE J. HAAS, Minister 

"Holiness Becomefh Thine House, Lord, Forever" 



All out for God and souls 

C. HELEN MOOSHIAN 

Evangelist 
Church of the Nazarene 



Box 527 
Kansas City 10, Missouri 



Compliments of 




THOMAS J. McCUSKER 

Layman Preacher 

Available for One Night Meetings 

Gospel Singer 

4402 Denison Avenue Cleveland, Ohio 

/•'o/- Reference 

Write— 0. L. Benedum, Dist. Svpt. 

Akron District— Church of the Nazarene 



{179} 




Warren, Ohio 
First Church 

Buckeye and 

Mulberry Streets 



MALE QUARTET 




I). I). I'AI.MKH, Pastor 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHOIR 



A CHURCH WHERE YOl A.RE NEVER A STRANGER' 



•( 180 > 



YOUNG 
PEOPLE'S SOCIETY 

Church of the Nazarene 

Riddle at Meridian 

Ravenna, Ohio 

R. J. SMELTZER 

Pastor 



Howard Smylie 
Helen Briceland 
Mrs. Karl Deming 



S. S. Superintendent 
N. Y. P. S. President 
W. F. M. S. President 




Copley, Ohio 

CHURCH 

of the 

NAZARENE 

Pastor 
J. L. McCLUNG 



Compliments of the . . . 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

200 Second Street, N.W. 
Barberton, Ohio 

"The Heart-Warming Church" 



Compliments of . . . 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Warwick, Ohio 

"We Preach Holiness" 
CLIFFORD F. CHURCH, Pastor 



EMMANUEL 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

'Where visitors feel at home, friend holds fellowship with 
friend, and all worship God." 

4105 East 114th Street 
Cleveland, Ohio 



A. E. WOODCOOK 

Minister 

4165 E. 114th Street 

Diamond 2<K5(i 




Sunday School 






!):.'!() A.M. 


Worship 






10:4.-) A.M. 


Young Peoples 






6:45 P.M. 


Juniors (5-12 years) 






<i:4.-» P.M. 


Evening Evangelistic 






7::i() P.M. 


Prayer and Praise, Wed 


nesd 


iv 


7 :.'!() P.M. 



{181} 



ALBANY DISTRICT 



Church of the Nazarene 




TENTH 



ANNIVERSARY 







Assembly 



Camp Meeting 



Julv 15th to 18th 



Julv 18th to 27th 



Renard 1). Smith, Sup't. 
Morris 15. Wilson, Set . 
Arthur Olcott, Treas. 

Advisory linnril 

Rev. 0. I?. Arnold 
Rev. Walter MacPhersoi 
Mr. Arthur Olcotl 
Mr. Glen Rogers 



DR. II. V. MILLER, General Sup't. 
REV. PETER WISEMAN, Evangelist 
REV. C. II. COX, Evangelist 
FRANK SMITH, Song Leader 
MRS. HELEN FRY, Pianist 



District Office and Parsonage 



<>■><.) West Pleasant Avenue 



Syracuse .">, New York 



I'lione t-tStS 



{182) 



The Trinity Church 
of the 



N 



azarene 



Altona, N. Y. 

REV. A. N. CHRISTENSEN 
Pastor 




Mrs. Tena Duley, S. S. Superintendent 

Miss [rma Duley, N.Y.P.S. President 

Mrs. Tena Duley, W.F.M.S. President 

. . . When in the North Country . . . 
COME AND WORSHIP 



{ 1X3 } 



FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE 



240 Main Street 
Binghamton, N. Y. 



PAUL S. GIL.MORE 
Pastor 




Church School 10:00 a.m. 
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. 
Young Peoples 6:80 p.m. 
Evening Service 7:30 p.m. 
Mid-week Prayer Service, 
Wednesday 7:30 p.m. 



ADIRONDACK 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Vermontville, N. Y. 

A Friendly Church in the Mountains 
Where you are a stranger hut once 

ERNEST V. SWARTHOUT 

Pastor 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

1813 Albany Street 
Schenectady, N. Y. 

REV. WALTEB S. MacPHERSON, SR. 

Pastor 



Sunday 


Services 




Sunday School 






10:00 AM 


Morning Worship 






11:00 A.M 


X. Y. P. S. 






7:00 P.M 


Evangelist ic Service 






7:1.-. P.M 




Wedi 


esday 




I'ra ver and PrS ise 






7:45 I'M 



When in Schenectady worship with us, 



\ 184 }• 



FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

West Newell and Cannon Streets 
SYRACUSE 5, NEW YORK 

'Sincere wishes for God's blessing to continue to rest upon 
Eastern Nazarene College and congratulations to Class of '47' 

U. 13. ARNOLD, Sit., Minister 



BEST WISHES FROM 
ELMIRA, NEW YORK 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

(Holdridge at Cedar) 

"A Lower Light for The Darkest Night" 

ANTHONY B. SAMPSON 
Pastor 



"Saints of the singing heart" 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

24 Seminary Avenue 
Auburn, New York 

REV. FREDERICK LINDBLAD 

Pastor 

"They say tec' re friendly!" 



When in the Southern Tier . . . 
— Visit the — 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Owego, N. Y. 

Sunday School 10:00 A.M. 

Morning Worship 11:00 A.M. 

N. Y. I'. S. 0:30 P.M. 

Singspiration and Evangelistic Service 7::i() P.M. 

Mid-week Prayer Meeting, Wednesday 7:80 P.M. 

REV. HERVEY W. BROWN, Pastor 



ALBANY 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

728 Madison Ave. (on U.S. 20) 
Albany 3, N. Y. 




C. W. Lindeman, Pastor 

CONGRATULATIONS 

ON 

SILVER ANNIVERSARY OF NAUTILUS 



{ 185 > 



NEW ENGLAND DISTRICT 

Extends Congratulations To 

SILVER ANNIVERSARY NAUTILUS 




District Organi zaiions: 

New England District Camp Meeting, Inc. 
\V. F. M. S- Rev. Mrs. Ann K. Stead, President 
\. Y. 1'. S- Rev. Donald II. Strong, President 
Church School — Rev. J. K. Ilunlon, Chairman 



J. ('. Albright, Dist. Supt. 



Our Fourfold Program: 

Strong local organizations 

Enlarged Home Mission endeavors 

Foreign field expansion 

Forward Christian Education program 




This picture represents the united effort of district leadership and students of E.N.C 
;it Bethel Beach, Quincy, Mass, 



■( 1 S6 1- 




The South Portland 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

176 Sawyer Street 
South Portland, Maine 

James E. Hunton, Minister 

EXTENDS . . . 
BEST WISHES AND CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE (LASS OE '47 



When You Visit 

Vacationland 
Stop to Worship 

Tune WCAN— 560K.C. 

THE NAZARENE HOUR 
Each Sunday 1 P.M. 




EMMANUEL 




CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 


WALTHAM 


470 Smithfield Avenue 




Pawtucket, R. I. 


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 


( Now Mortgage Free I 


33 Myrtle Street 


Church School !):4."> AM. 




Morning Worship 11:00 A.M. 
X. Y. P. S. and Hi X. V. 6:15 P.M. 


Waltham, Mass. 


Evangelistic Hour 7:0(1 l'.M 




Prayer Service, Wednesday 7:45 l'.M. 




Adolph Wahl, Secretary 

William Ililler, Treasurer 


"The Singing Church" 


Mrs. Wm. Hiller, W.F.M.S. President 




Thomas Ryan, N.)'.I'.S. President 




Eldred Eaton, 8. S. Superintendent 




HOMER M. SMITH 


ROBERT E. RUNDLETT 


Minister 


Pastor 


"A little church with u big message" 





i L87 }- 



Jf trst Cfjurcf) of tfie JSa^arene 



Judson Square, Maiden, Massachusetts 




Morning Services 
10:00 Sunday School 
1 1 :00 Junior Church 
11:00 Morning Worship 

Evening Services 
6:00 Class Meeting 
(i:00 Young People's Society 
7:00 Evangelistic Service 



The Friendly Church With A Gospel Message" 



Congratulations to the 
Class of 1947 



And t<> the President, Vice President, 
Dean, and Professors for ;i glorious 
task "Well Done." 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Burlington, Vermont 

[RVING s. JONES 
Pastor 

" Your ( hurch for Worship and Sert ice" 



FRAMINGHAM 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

250 Franklin Street 



The 
Gospel 
Center 



o. 



r 




Our 
Prayer 

"Others' 



Pastor, J. A. CRITES 



Sunday School 
N. V. V. s. 
II . F. M. S. 
) . W. I'. M. S. 



Fred Flewelling 

Irma Tollicrt 

Winifred Sherman 

I.ynct te Wagner 



i 188 } 







The Vision of 
the Future 



The WOLL ASTON Church of the Nazarene 

93 EAST ELM AVENUE, WOLLASTON, MASS. 
Rev. J. Glenn Gould, D.D., Pastor 



SUNDAY 

Sunday School 9:45 a.m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. 

Young People's 6:30 p.m. 

Evangelistic Service 7:30 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY 
Prayer Meeting 7:30 P.M. 



* * * 



ALL ARE WELCOME 



{ ISO > 



GOLDEN JUBILEE 



SILVER 



1897 




1 947 



MANCHESTER, CONN. 

Tliis year marks the FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY of our local 
organization. We join you in celebration of your SIIAER 
ANNIVERSARY. We "go forward" together. 



REV. JAMES A. YOUNG, Pastor 



MISS MARION E. JANES 
President N.Y.P.S. 



TENNYSON Mel ALL 
Superintendent S. S. 




—Friendly 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

71 Chapel Street 
Norwood, Mass. 

"We stand behind E.N.C. »itlt our prayers, mir 
young people and out money. 

R. E. HOWARD 

PastOT 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 



BEVERLY, MASS. 



Corner Cabot and Rantoul 



R. E. LOCKWOOD 

Minister 



Sunday School 10:00 A.M. 

Morning Worship 11:00 A.M. 

N. Y. P. S. (>:00 P.M. 

Evening Service 7:00 P.M. 

Mid-week Prayer Service, Wednesday 7:.'io P.M. 



{ 190 > 



FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

234 Franklin Street 
Cambridge 39, Mass. 

Rev. II. Leslie MaeKav, Minister 



Sunday Services 

Prayer 9:30 A.M 

Sunday School 10:00 A.M. 

Morning Worship 1 1 :00 A.M. 

N. Y. I'. S. (i:()(l I'M. 

Evangelistic Hour 7:00 I'.M. 

Wednesday 

Prayer and Praise 7:30 I'.M. 




When in Boston 
Worship with Us 

Take Subvi ay Train 
at Field's Corner 

Get off at 
Central Square 

We arc E.N.C.'s Closesi Nazaren 
Neighbor 



.1 Christ-centered Church In Central Square, Cambridge 



FIRST CHURCH 
OF THE NAZARENE 

Cor. North and Leavett Streets 
SKOWHEGAN, MAINE 

ERNEST It. BRADLEY, Pastor 
135 Main Street Phone: Dial 9R 







Ser 


vices 




( lunch School 








10:00 A.M 


Morning Worship 








11:0(1 A.M 


X. Y. P. S. Tuesd 


ays 






7::(() I'.M 


Praise Service, Tl 


urs( 


lavs 




?:.'!() I'.M 



A I. L A H E W i: I, ( () M E II E K E 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

79 Lawrence Street 
New Haven 11, Conn. 



Celebrating our 25th year 

of service in New Haven 



Pastor, WILLIAM II. BENSON 
Phone 6-9436 



CONGRATULATIONS 
NAUTILUS 



•{191 } 




CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

First Street 
Lowell, Mass. 

Promoting Holiness Evangelism 
for Forty-five Years 



Services 



Sunday School 
Morning Worship 
*N. V. P. S. 

*Evangelistic Service 
Prayer Meeting, Thursday 

* Siiii/mcr, one half hour late, 



Rev. I). Ward Albright 

I'a.stor 



9:45 A.M. 
10:45 A.M. 
5:80 P.M. 
6:30 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 



Parsonage 
247 Beacon St. 

Tel. 89342 

Church Phone 

31063 



A Church where all are welcome 



HAROLD M. McEWAN 


Compliments of 


Distributors of 




RELIGIOUS MERCHANDISE 




41 School Street, Burlington, Vt. 


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 


( Ihildren's ( lolor Books 


Waterville 


Bible Quiz Booklets 




Bible Games 


Vermont 


choice Fiction for Teen-Agers 




Song and Chorus Books 




Novelties and Wall Plaques 




Distinctive Religious Books 




Send for complete catalogue 


PAUL W. MARSDEN 


"Member! Church of the Nazarene" 


Pastor 



i 182 > 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Spruce and Smith Streets 
New Bedford, Mass. 

Pastor, JOHN E. WARNER TURPEI^-62 STATE STREET 
Phono 7-9545 



Church Services 

BIBLE SCHOOL 10:00 A.M. 

WORSHIP 11:00 A.M. 

JUNIOR 2:30 P.M. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S 6:00 P.M. 

EVANGELISTIC 7:00 P.M. 



Secretary 

Treasurer 

W.F.M.S. President 
Sunday School Swp't. 
N.V.P.S. President 



Church Officers 

CURTIS GREANY 

ANNIE SYLVARIA 

MRS. J. W. TURPEL 

JULIA VAUGHAN 

ALTON BRALEY 



THURSDAY WEEKLY PRAYER MEETING 



":30 P.M. 



MISSION SERVICES: Week Nights, Tues. and Fri. 7:30 P.M. 
Sundays 7:30 P.M. 

The Church with a Holy Freedom and a Human Friendliness 
A Debtor to E. N. C. 



— The Graduate's Heritage — 

"Thou wilt show me the path of life: in Thy 
presence is fulness of joy; at Thy right hand are 
pleasures evermore." (Psalm 16:11) 



— Praise God — 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

11 East Main Street 
Waterbury, Conn. 

MYRON E. RICHEY, Pastor 
144 Buckingham Street 

— We also joy in our Lord Jesus Christ — 
(Rom. 5; II) 



PROVIDENCE PEOPLE'S 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Corner of Ashmont and Plain Streets 
Providence, R. I. 

Pastor, REV. NYLES H. EATON 



»S'. S. Superintendent 
V. P. President 
If. /•'. M. S. President 
V. W. /•'. M. S. President 



Meetings 



Sunday School 

Morning Worship 

Young People 

Evangelistic Service 

Prayers Meetings, Tuesday and Thursday 



Mr. Louis Vale 

Richard Murgatroyd 

Mrs. Agnes Eaton 

Christine Lyons 

10:00 A.M. 
11:00 A.M. 

0:00 P.M. 

7:00 P.M. 



7:t.-» P.M. 



{ 193 } 




Arthur M. Fallon 
Pastor 



\\ lion you come to Boston, visit . . . 

THE CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Melrose, Mass. 
Cor. Green and Short Streets 

(Take any bus from Everetl Station) 

".1 Living Church with a Vital Message" 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 

THE CLASS OF 1947 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 




West Broadway 


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 


Derry, N. H. 


10 Church Street 


REV. ROBERT W. CARLSON 

Minister 


(At Everett Sq.) 

Everett, Mass. 


Sunday School 10:00 A.M. 


. 1 Holiness Church 


Morning Worship 1 1:00 A.M. 


for more than fifty years 


Evangelistic Service ?:<><• P.M. 




Prayer Meeting, Thursday 7:;M> P.M. 




.^■^""V 




CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 




The Church Where You Arc Never 




K* i 




. 1 Stranger 




A ~^J 




52 Westminster Street 








Springfield, Mass. 








Sec our church •-if.'n on State Sired, one mile From 




the cciilcr, Route No. 20. Preinds traveling between 


II. J. s. BLANEY 


Boston and New York, visit us. 


Pastor 


K. J. KIRKLAND 




Pastor 









i 194 > 



Compliments of 



WEST SOMERVILLE 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Located at the Corner of 
Elm and Russell Streets 

BYRON II. MAYBURY 

Pastor 



COMMUNITY 

VISITATION . . . 

to secure NEW 

Sunday School Scholars . . 

is a successful project 

of many N.Y.P.S. groups . 
and a challenge 

to every wide-awake church. 

For Information, Write To 

ELMER II. KAUFFMAN 

134 Grand View Avenue 

Wollaston 70, Mass. 



The New England District 

N. Y. P. S. 

BELIEVES IN E.N.C. 

. . . Its leadership 

. . . Its student body 

. . . Its purpose 

... Its program 

District Council 
Rev. J. ('. Albright .Mrs. Jean Bell 

Rev. D. II. Strong Mrs. Ruth Wood 

Rev. Homer Smith Rev. Leslie Strathern 

Mrs. Alice Kauffman Rev. Llovd Gordon 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

20 Stone Street 
Augusta, Maine 



".1 Church of the common people 
where yon are n stranger hut om'c." 



STANFORD ('. TAYLOR 
Pastor 



A hearty welcome t<> all who worship with us. 



{195} 




Leland Davis George Andrews Paul Andrews Dick Hawk 

Haritone 1st Tenor '2nd Tenor Bass 

TUNE IN 

Start your day listening to the Crusaders' Quartet on the "Wings of the 

Morning" program. 

Station: WIIDH 850 on your radio dial. Time: 6:45 to 7:00 A.M. Daily 

except Sunday. 
The Crusaders take this opportunity to express their appreciation to the many pastors who have opened 
their churches to us this school year. Ours has been the joy of singing the "Good News of Full Salvation" 
and the joy that comes from service for Him. Thank you so much. 



NEW ENGLAND 






YOUTH FOR CHRIST 

BOSTON RALLY 

JOHN A. HUFFMAN, Director 

MAINTAINS A YEAR AROUND WITNESS 

Inspirational Music 

Stirring Testimonies 

( Challenging Messages 

Sponsors Cuba Y.F.C. 



7.30 each Saturday night 



PARK STREET CHURCH 



{ 196 > 



12,000,000 
SOILS 



THE 
GREATEST 
MISSION FIELD 
IN THE U.S.A. 



New York District 
Church or the Nazarene 




District Su perintendent 

L. E. ECKLEY 

Beacon, \. Y. 



AN AGGRESSIVE 
PROGRAM 



DEEP INTEREST IN 
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 





CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 


Compliments of . . . 


Hudson Street 




Dover, New Jersey 




"A Lively Church with a Living Message" 


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 






We Have . . . 


Middletown, N. Y. 


• Seven college students enrolled this year 




• Four veterans 




• A Memorial Room in New Dormitory 




• Furnished a room in New Dormitory 


FRANKLIN COMRIE 


REV. C. <;. SCHLOSSER, Pastor 


Pastor 






S Myrtle Avenue Phone: Dover 6-2251 



{ 197 > 




FIRST CHURCH 

OF THE 

NAZARENE 

RICHMOND HILL, N.Y. 
Cor. 95th Ave. and 108th St. 

One block South of Atlantic Ave. 



REV. E. K. YOUNG, M.A.. Pastor 
Virginia !>-.">?.'i4- 



When in New York you'll feel <if home in this church 



Congratulations to the 
Class of '47 

HOOPLE CHURCH 
OF THE NAZARENE 

64 Menahan St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(Gates Ave. Station: B.M.T.) 

Pastor: VERNON E. THOMAS 

!)!).'{ Hulsey Street 

Brooklyn, N. V. 



FIRST CHURCH 
OF THE NAZARENE 



Kingston, N. Y. 



REV. KENNETH PEARSALL 
Pastor 



Greetings fro 



in 



BEACON 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

'Enter into his court* with praise" 

1 Teller Avenue 
Beacon, N. Y. 



Sunday Morning 

9:45 A.M. 

11:00 A.M. 

Sunday Evening 
6:30 P.M. 
6:45 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 

Thursday Evening 
7:30 P.M. 



Bible School 
Morning Worship 

Prayer Meeting 

Young People 
Preaching Service 



Prayer Meeting 

WILLIAM o. UNCAPHER, Pastor 

Your Besl Friend and Mine. Who??? 
Jesus Christ 



{198} 



1 - 




FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Ocean Avenue and Garfield Place 
EAST ROCKAWAY 
LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 



CURTIS I). WITHROW 

Pastor 



'When on Long Island visit our Friendly Church' 




S.V.E. Projectors 
Religious Slides 
and Film Stripes 



Bibles, Books, Etc. 

Religious Gifts 

and Novelties 



CLARENCE A. DICKSON 

30 Court Street 
Valley Stream, N. Y. 

Phone— V.S. 5-9204 



CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL 
SUPPLIES 



Sacred Recordings 



Flags and Banners 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

2 Granville Avenue 
Danbury, Conn. 



Church School 
Morning Worship 
X. V. P. s. 
Evangelistic Service 
Mid-week Prayer Service 



i):4.> A.M. 
10:45 A.M. 
(1:4.-) P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 
~a:> P.M. 



REV. JAMES L. BENDER 
Pastor 



{ 199 > 



CONGRATULATIONS TO CLASS OF '47 

from 

ONTARIO DISTRICT 

Church of the Nazarene 



CLARENCE WHITMORE 
1 s 1 Laughton Avenue 

Toronto, Ontario 




II. V. MUXWORTHY 

1!):? Main St. 
Toronto. Ontario 



District Superintendent 

EDWARD R. FERGUSON 

.57 Brant Ave., Brantford, Out 



DISTRICT CENTER 
Nazarene Camp Grounds — PefFerlaw, Onatario 



SECOND ANNUAL DISTRICT (AMP 
July SH to 13th 

Girls' Camp— July 14th to 20th Roys' Camp— July 21st to 27th 

Why not enjoy your vacation with us, at Ontario's Reality Spot, "Cedardalc" 
Nazarene Camp Grounds, Pefferlaw, Out., sixty miles north of Toronto 
A time of spiritual uplifting — Also, good eats, boating, and fishing 

For information write: Sect. Rev. II. V. Muxwortliy 

:5(i.'5 Main Street 
Toronto, Ontario 



■I 200 1- 



St. Clair Church of the Nazarene 

1277 St. Clair Avenue, West 
Toronto, Ontario 

REV. HENRY II. REEVES, M.A., I?. I)., Minister 
MR. ELDEX 15. LEHMAN, Director of Music 
Best Wishes and Congratulations to the Class of '47 





. . . Compliments of . . . 

FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

186 Cowan Avenue 
Toronto 3, Ontario 

M inister 
HAROLD R. BROWN 



Res. Tel. Lakeside 0571 



Parsonage: 94 Cowan Ave. 



Toronto 

MAIN STREET 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

363 Main Street 
Toronto, Ontario 

II. V. MUXWORTHY, Minister 



Phone: (ill. 5485 



Parsonage: 3(S.'i Main St. 



{ 201 > 



PITTSBURGH DISTRICT 



Advisory Board 
Rev. George < >. Cole 
Rev. L. S. Mershimer 
M r. Maurice IJ. Emery 
Mr. L. G. Klire.v 

Secretary 
Rev. II. II. Marvin 
Treasurer 
Mr. Maurice R. Emery 




Trustees 
Rev. R. I". Heinlein 
Rev A. II. Elsey 

M r. Maurice 1{. l-.inc i \ 
Mr. Charles Sinilli 



REV. 11. F. II KIM. KIN 
District Superintendent 

A Itevival in every Church and a Church in every Town in the District 




Alemeda Park, Butter, Pa. 



DISTRICT ASSEMBLY 
DISTRICT CAMP MEETING 
YOUNG PEOPLE'S INSTITUTE 



May 7 9 

Mj S l'. 

August 11-18 



"We can if we will — we can and we will' 



^202 > 




CHURCH OF THE 
NAZARENE 

GROVE CITY, PA. 
520 N. Center Street 

Sunday Services 

Sunday School 9: 15 A.M. 

Worship 11:00 A.M. 

Juniors and \. Y. P. S. 6:45 P.M. 

Evangelistic Service 7 :.'!0 P.M. 

Wednesday 

Prayer Service 7:.'i0 P.M. 




('. E. Neiderhiser 



Jfir£t Cfjurri) of tfje J^arene 

212-214 Sycamore Street 

Mount Washington 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

I). P. BRICKLEY, Minister 



I Thess. .'5: 13 



Phone Everglade 3770 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Corner W. Falls and Beaver Streets 
New Castle, Pa. 



Roof Garden 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

West Union Street 

Somerset, Pa. 



A. II. ELSEY 










Pastor 






Services 

Sunday School 

Worship 

X. Y. P. S. and Juniors 


9:45 A.M. 

10:t.-> A.M 
(i:4.-> P.M. 


FIRST CHURCH 






OF THE NAZARENE 






Evangelistic Service 


7:45 P.M. 


21st and Wallace Streets 






Wednesday 




Erie, Pennsylvania 






Prayer Meeting 


7:t.> P.M. 


REV. A. V. MOUNTFORD 






REV. HAROLD A. MARSH 




Pastor 
Sunday School 


(M.-» A 


M. 


Pastor 




Worship Service 


1:00 A.M. 






Youth Meeting 


0:30 P 


M. 


3K*> West I nion Street 




Evangelistic Service 


7:30 I' 


M. 


Somerset, Pa. 




Prayer Meeting, Wednesday 


7:80 P.M. 







{ 203 > 



Cf)urd) of tf)e JJajarene 

Pennsylvania Avenue, East and Irvine Street 

Warren, Pa. 

AGGRESSIVE EVANGELISTIC 

".In Older Church with a Youthful Spirit" 




Young People's Choir 



Sunday School !): \r> A.M. 

Morning Worship 1 1900 A.M. 

\. v. r - G 30 P.M. 

Singspiration ?:.'f() to 8:00 I'M. 
Evangelistic Preaching 8:00 P.M. 




Prayer Med ing, 






Wednesday 1 :.w V 


M. 


' Sk. ^^1 I 


"SHOWERS OF BLESSIN( 






Sundaj 1:15 to 1 :S0 1' 


M 


. : . >»» --^ iv&S 


W.N.A.E., Warren, Pa. 




(;. V. woods 

PtUtor 

Phone l!»<! 



Full Gospel Preaching 

Inspiring Singing 

Progressive Sunday School 

Live N.Y.P.S. 

Challenging Missionary 

Socictv 



•I 204 )- 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 



Penn Avenue 
New Brighton, Pa. 




M. K. SPROW 
Minister 

H0.5 Fifth St. 

New Brighton, Pa. 

Phone 3183 



Sunday 

Bible School 9:30 

Morning Worship 10:4.) 

Young Peoples <>:45 

Evangelistic 7:4.3 



Mid- Week 

Prayer Meeting 

Wednesday 7:4.> 

Youtli Prayer Service 

Friday 7:4.» 




A SANCTUARY DEDICATED FOR PROPAGATION 
OF SCRIPTURAL HOLINESS 



CIRCLEVILLE 


Compliments of . . . 


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 






The 


REV. MFRL M. BENNER 




Pastor 


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 


R. D. No. 1 




Irwin, Pa. 


North Bennett at Interstate Pkwy. 


Telephone 17S.> 


Bradford, Pa. 


"My House Shall lie Called The House of 


REV. GORDON GRAVES 


Prayer" Isa. 56-7 


Pastor 



{ 205 > 



Washington-Philadelphia 
District 



Secretary f ^^ Treasurer 

C. E. ARNOLD ** ** (i. E. HUDSON 

4:5!) Easl Fourth St. » 1?..\ .">•> 

m.x.msl.urf;. I'm. V ^^fe II.vatt-.vilU-, M.I. 



J. II. PARKER 

District Superintendent 

S102 Windsor Ave. 

Baltimore 16, Md. 



DISTRICT CENTER 
Nazarene Campgrounds — North East, Maryland 



ANNUAL DISTRICT CAMPMEETING 

August 1 10 

T. M. Anderson Evangelist 

•lack Bierce Song Leader 

Lawn-nee Dubois Youth Evangelist 



DISTRICT N.Y.P.S. ANNUAL INSTITUTE 
Campground — August 25-September 1 



SPECIAL FEATURE 

Boys' Camp — July 7 12 Girls' Camp — -)ul\ It lit 



\ 206 > 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE SENIORS OF 1947 

When in 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

Attend 

THE FIRST CHURCH 

of the 

NAZARENE 

WHITMORE AVENUE 
(South of Edmondson) 



Rev. Everett S. Phillips, Pastor 
Robert Clifford, Assistant Pastor 



Listen to our radio program every Saturday Night at 11 :15 — Station WCAO 



{ 2 0" } 




Compliments of 



First Church 
of the Nozorene 

910 Highland Avenue 
Chester, Pa. 





Sundav Services 




Church School 




9:45 A.M 


Morning Worship 




10:45 A.M 


X. Y. P. S. 




(i:4.j J'.M 


Evangelistic Service 


Wednesday 
'rayer and Praise Service 


1A:> I'M 



Rev. Charles E. Holloway, Minister 
The Friendly Church 

Where you may be a visitor hut never a stranger 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Ross Avenue 
New Market, Pa. 



■WS 



Sunday School Superintendent 
X. Y. I'. S. President 
II / . .1/. S. President 

Minister 



Harold Clemens 

Doris Noll 

Mrs. Helen Noll 



REV. JAMES F. McMILLAN 

IA Ross Avenue, Bella Vista 

New Cumberland, Pa. 



CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Deepwater, N. J. 




Sunday School Supt. 

H. I.. Ware 

A'. Y. /'. S. Pres. 

Edward Keen 

II /. .1/. S. Pres. 

M r*. I'. Zanes, Sr. 

y. ii'. / . m. s. Sup. 

Mr-. Wendell Sullivan 

Junior Supervisor 

Mr-, c. <;. Rife 



REV. C. (.. RIFE 



Pastor 



\ 208 } 



_i*i. 





Sunday Services 

Sunday Bible School 

Worship 

Senior and Hi. X. V. P. S. 

Mid-Week Service 
Prayer Meeting, Wednesday 



9:30 A.M. 

10:30 A.M. 

0:45 P..M 



7:4.5 P.M. 



Calvary Church of the Nazarene 

Center Avenue and Fourth Street 
Reading, Pa. 

REV. G. THOMAS SPIKER, Pastor 

Residence 1209 N. Fifth Street 

Phone 2-9890 

Broadcast 

Every Sunday Afternoon from 2:00-2:30, Station WEEU, Reading, Pa., 850 on the Dial. 
Inspiring singing with organ and piano accompaniment 



Suburban Philadelphia's Largest 



Church of the Nazarene 

Staley Ave. and MacDade Blvd. 
Collingdale, Pa. 



WORSHIP 
EVANGELISM 
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 
HOLINESS— OCR WATCHWORD" 

Come and Sec 




FRANCIS DANIEL KETNER 

Minister 



{ 209 > 




CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

250 East Seventh Street 
Bloomsburg, Pa. 



Sunday School <) : :jo A.M. 

Morning Worship ]<>:+."> A.M. 

\. Y. P. S. 7:nn |'\|. 

Evening Worship ? : 4.-> I'M. 

Prayer Meeting, 

Wednesday : : i."> P.M. 



CLARENCE L. ARNOLD 
Minister 

4.'!!t East Fourth Street 

Phone <;:u; 



I ii Hi, nor of our first E. N.C. Student 
.Mary Elizabeth Williams 

FIRST CHURCH 
OF THE NAZARENE 

350 West Princess Street 
YORK, PA. 

"I Friendly and Groining Church" 




William Harold Binkley 
Minister 





JOHN WESLEY M \YIU RY 
Pastor 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Charles and Centre Streets 

•On the Old N.it'l Trail" 

Frost burg, Maryland 



\2W\ 



Compliments of 

CHURCH OF THE 
NAZARENE 

616 Severn Avenue 
Eastport, Md. 




II. I. BASHAM, Minister 

Parsonage 

711 Severn Avenue 

Phone: 

Annapolis 2183 




"Where you are never a stranger" 



CONGRATULATIONS 
CLASS OF 1947 



HAGERSTOWN, MD. 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

(West Side Ave. and Church St.) 



Fred M. Henek 
Pastor 



Residence 
811 Salem Ave. 



Phone 
3179- W 



Compliments of 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

PHILADELPHIA 
PENNSYLVANIA 



Minister 
Russell G. Lenael 



{211} 



'Where one goes hereafter depends largely on what one goes after here" 




ROYERSFORD 
PENNSYLVANIA 

N. Y. P. S. 

Mildred Bean President 

Emily l'latt Vice- President 

Eunice Kagle Secretary 

Glenn Kagle Treasurer 

Lorraine Ottinger Pianist 



GEORGE W. ANDREWS, Minister 
"A Friend to All" 

Parsonage: 44.5 Washington Street 
Telephone: 4.57 



An Invitation to Worship 



Church of the Nazarene 

Richardson and Derstine Avenues 
LANSDALE, PA. 



Sunday School 9:30 A.M. 
Worship 1()::{» A.M. 

Young People 7:1)0 I'M. 

Evangelistic Service 

?:i:. I'M. 
Mid- Week Service, 

Wednesday 8:00 P.M. 




NELSON (i. MINK 

Minister 

12] Derstine Avenue 

I'linne 
1446 



"The Master is here and calleth for thee" 



(212) 



jftrst Cfmrcf) of tfie J|a?arene 

Dean and Darlington Streets 
WEST CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA 





PAUL S. COOK 

Pastor 

Residence 

202 Dean Street 

Phone 1268 



"The Revival Church" 

A WARM WELCOME TO EVERYONE 



FIRST CHURCH 


FIRST CHURCH 


OF THE NAZARENE 


OF THE NAZARENE 


Fifth Ave. near Maryland Ave. 


Cumberland, Md. 


Wilmington, Del. 






REV. C. X. HUTCHINSON 


Services 


Pastor 


Bible School 9:45 A.M. 




Morning Worship 11:00 A.M. 
N. Y. P. S. Hour 7:00 P.M. 


A growing Church in Western Maryland 


Evangelistic Service 7:45 P.M. 
Prayer Meeting, Wednesday 7:45 P.M. 


Booster for E.N.C. 




When this way the church invites you to 


Radio Ministry 


worship with them 


"Your Nazarene Neighbors" WDEL (1150 k.c.) 




Sundays— 8:05-8:30 A.M. 


Sunday School 9:S0 A..M 


Entering tenth year of broadcasting 


Morning Worship 10:15 A.M 


CHESTER M. WILLIAMS, Minister 
14 Fifth Avenue Phone 4-1100 


Evening Service 7:30 P.M 




Mid-week Prayer and Praise 




Wednesdays 7:80 P.M 


YOU A It K W EL CO M E 





<213> 




ERNEST E. GROSSE 
Minister 



WHEN YOU VISIT WASHINGTON 



WORSHIP AT 



FIRST CHURCH 
of the NAZARENE 



7th and A Streets, N. E. 



#?ys& 




w, ■ a. v • ■ #$4 

life « MM- 



.;*>v 



6 ' s fir if* i $j 

dSL^, will 



I 



Washington's Largest and Most Aggressive Downtown 
Evangelistic Center 



•{-Ml r 



"OTfjere § ou Sre $eber a Stranger " 




Jfirsit Cburcfj of tfje Jla^arene 

llth and Wyoming Sts. 
Allentown, Pa. 



Compliments 
of the 

n. y. p. s. 

Richard Simons, President 



Sunday Services 

Sunday Bible School <):,'») A.M. 

Morning Worship 10:45 A.M. 

N. V. P. S. Devotional Service 7:00 P.M. 

Junior Meeting 7:00 P.M. 

Evangelistic Service 7:4.) P.M. 

M id-Week Service 

Wednesday 7 A:> I'.M 

Missionary Service 

First Wednesday of Month 

RALPH A. MICKEL 

Minister 



1109 Wyoming Street 



Phone 6422 



Compliments of 

THE FIRST CHURCH 
OF THE NAZARENE 

Frederick, Maryland 



REV. JOHN E. NORTH 
Pastor 



FAITH CHURCH 
OF THE NAZARENE 

(Washington's Suburban Church) 

Seat Pleasant, Md. 

Minister, RUSSELL <i. LENGEL 

.">:i7 Addison Road 
Washington 19, D.C. 

Phone Hillside 2197 



FIRST CHURCH 
OF THE NAZARENE 

Euclid Ave. and Hampton St. 

Trenton 

Capital City of New Jersey 



Officers 



S. S. Superintendent 

N. V. P. S. President 
W. /•'. M. S. President 
Treasurer 



Mrs. Joseph ( rane 

P. P. Van Aken, Jr. 

Mrs. John Frawley 

Mr. Lew is I.arkin 



REV. BOYD M. LONG 
Pastor 



{215} 



CONGRATULATIONS 

(MASS OF 1947 




First Church of the Nazarene 

12th and Spring Garden Sts. 
Easton, Pa. 



Sunday School 
Morning Worship 
Prayer Service 
\. V. P. S. 
Evangelistic Service 



10:00 A.M. 
11:00 A.M. 

6:30 P.M. 

7:00 P.M. 

7:45 P.M. 



A CHURCH WHERE EVERYONE 
IS WELCOME 



E. WAI.TKR MII.LKH 



Pastor 



Compliments of . . . 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

Pine and Freedley Streets 
Norristown, Pa. 




Rev. Karl C. Wolf, l'axtnr 
Services 



Sunday . . . 
( Ihurcfa School 
Worship 

N. V. P. S. 

Evangelist ic Service 

Wednesday . . . 
Prayer Service 



'.)■.[.; A.M. 

10:1.-) A.M. 

c,a:> I'M 
7::to P.M. 



a:, I'M. 



\V. I' - . M. S. fir-t Wednesday of each monil 



OXFORD CHURCH 
OF THE NAZARENE 

Penn Avenue and Locust Street 
Oxford, Pa. 




Pastor: 

Arthur ( '. McKeii/ie 
826 Broad St. 

Oxford, Pa. 



( Ireel ings to t lie class of 17 

— from — 

'The Friendly Church on the Corner' 



{216} 




Preacher 
Soloist 

Vibra-harpist 

Flannel-graph artist 

Formerly connected with the 
Olson Sisters Evangelistic Party 



MARY E. OLSOX 

Swedish Singing Evangelist. 



Address: 

817 South Crawford Street 

Troy, Ohio 

(Western Ohio District) 




REV. AND MRS. D. D. MACKEY 

Evangelist 

Montpelier, Indiana 

— Musicians — 

Featuring 12 different instruments 

Saxophone, Solo vox, Xylophone, Electric 

Hawaiian Guitar, Trombone and Piano 

Water Glass Harmony 
Novelty Instruments 



Compliments of 




EVANGELIST 

in 

CHURCH OF 
THE NAZARENE 



(HESTER D. PLUMMER 
2109 Newton Street 
Columbus, Indiana 



* Mass Evangelism 

* Personal Evangelism 

* Youth Evangelism 

* Sunday School Evangelism 



{217 > 



1947 Nautilus Sponsors 



MAURICE R. EMERY 
25 Franklin St. 
Warren, Pa. 

WILLIAM HERRSCHAFT 
1867 Woodhaven Blvd. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

LEONARD M. SPANGENBERG 
178 Quinobequin Rd. 
Waban, Mass. 

WILFORD F. HAMMAR 
81 Wilda Ave. 
Youngstown, Ohio 

ROBERT J. SHOFF 
27 Searles St. 
Livermore Falls, Me. 



ROCKLAND CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. Curtis L. Stanley, Pastor 
120 Camden St. 
Rockland, Me. 

WEST TORONTO CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. William Summerscales, Pastor 
164 Cumberland St. 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada 

MILLVILLE CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. Ira E. Fowler, Pastor 
201 N. Fourth St. 
Millville, N. J. 

NELSON H. HENCK 
918 First St. 
Baltimore, Md. 



REV. and MRS. H. B. WARD 
1084 Stroman Ave. 
Akron 6, Ohio 



BEL AIR CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. H. E. Heckert, Pastor 
Bel Air, Md. 



CAMBRIDGE CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. Ray E. Banks, Pastor 
537 Madison Ave. 
Cambridge, Ohio 



HANOVER CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. Thomas S. Fowler, Pastor 
22 Charles St. 
Hanover, Pa. 



ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. Floyd Gale, Pastor 
Linden Ave. and Summit Sts. 
Alliance, Ohio 

GREENTOWN CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. L. L. Collar, Pastor 
Box 3 
Greentown, Ohio 

GREENE CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. John R. Soloky, Pastor 
R. D. 1 
Lockwood, Ohio 



STOCKDALE CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. Wilson G. Cole, Pastor 
Stockdale, Pa. 

HOMER CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. L. T. Wells, Pasto' 
26 Grant St. 
Homer City, Pa. 



JAMESTOWN CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. John W. Poole, Pastor 
147 Prather Ave. 
Jamestown, N. Y 



HAMILTON CHURCH OF THF NAZARENE 
Rev. Robert F. Woods, Pastor 
83 Ottawa St., North 
Hamilton, Ontario 



BUFFALO CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
Rev. Kenneth Babcock, Pastor 
578 Richmond Ave. 
Buffalo 13, N. Y. 



{218 )• 




Your Publishing House 



is an institution of the church. It is controlled by the church. It is operated 
for the sole purpose of serving the church as a denominational press and supply 
house and to assist the church in its program of giving the full gospel to the 
whole world. Its particular part of that program is of course the ministry 
of the printed page. 

To give you an idea of the part the Xazarene Publishing House is privileged 
to have in the work of the church we give you the following facts: 

The Nazarene Publishing House 

— has assets totaling more than one million dollars — every dollar dedicated 
to the task of spreading the gospel over the entire world. 

— is literally "girdling the globe with salvation." If the periodicals published 
since 1912 were placed end to end they would completely encircle the earth 
and cover more than 20,000 miles on the second circuit. More than 23,500,000 
periodicals are now being published annually. 

— is filling a vital place in the field of religious book publishing. During the 
calendar year closing December 31, 1940 more than 1.56,400 books and book- 
lets have been printed. 

— is a substantial contributor to the general interests of the church. Since 
1940, more than $174,000 has been given to various departments of genera] 
church activity. 

— is equipped and ready to fill orders for anything in the religious held needed 
for personal, Sunday school or church use. Your patronage is urged for any 
and all items of a religious nature needed by yourself, your church or your 
Sunday school. 

NAZARENE PUBLISHING HOUSE 

2923 Troost Avenue, Box 527 

Kansas City 10, Mo. 



{ 21<J > 



Commercia 











/ertising 



Through the accomplishment of this, the 1947 college 
annual, we have discovered, in our commercial friends, a prevailing 
sense of loyalty which cannot be excelled. We have listed in this 
section of the book a group of advertisers who represent the best 
in quality and service. 

In the long run it is the willing co-operation of these 
business men that contributes much to the existence of E.N.C.; not 
only by their yearly support of the publication of the Nautilus but 
by their untiring service to the college throughout the school year 
— many thanks to these business firms and their leaders. Let us show 
our appreciation by PATRONIZING our Commercial Advertisers 
thus boosting their desired and necessary CASH REGISTER SALES. 




EASTERN NAZARENE COLLEGE 

Member New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Affiliated with Northeastern University and 

New England Deaconess Hospital 



'ivinity Subjects 




Art and S 


cience Courses 




M. 


jsic Training 






DEGREES: 


A.B., 


B.S., Th.B. 








Spiritual 




( 'ultunil 




Social 






Practical 


English 
Rhetoric 
M usic 
Speech 
Languages 


Biblical Literature 
Philosophy 
Theology 
Homiletics 
Collegiate Nursing 




Biology 
Chemist rj 
Mathemal 
Physics 
1st Vear 1 


ingi 


ncering 


Education 

History 

Economics 

Psychology 

Sociology 



SUMMER SESSION BEGINS MAY 28 



FULL COLLEGE CREDIT 



Registration for Fall Term: September 9, 10 



•{ 222 r 



Success to 
Class of '47 

xVlways 

-L/oyal 

1 olite 

JTlappy 

Alert 



Welcome 
New Students 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1947 

SIGMA DELTA 

BETA 

Welcomes the Coming Freshman Class 

We Offer: 

friendly co-operation 
interesting activities 
participation in sports 

"Our aim is to please you" 



FRIENDSHIP . . . 

Isn't listed in the college curriculum. 
But Sigma Delta Gamma offers oppor- 
tunities to form friendships that endure, 
long after Greek verbs and chemical 
formulas are forgotten. 

"Good Luck, Seniors" 

SIGMA DELTA GAMMA 



{ 222 } 



QUINCYS LARGEST AND 

MOST BEAUTIFUL 



FUNERAL HOME 
and CHAPEL 




DEWARE BROTHERS 

DONALD M. DEWARE 

and 
ROBERT W. DEWARE 



REGISTERED FUNERAL DIKKCTOHS AM) FMIULMKKS 



-{221}- 



School Supplies Refreshments 



The Dugout 

"A friendly place to trade" 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 
THE SENIORS OF 1947 



100 YEARS 

EXPERIENCE TO HELP 

US SERVE YOU 

BETTER 

H. P. HOOD & SONS 

MILK -- CREAM 



{225} 



LINCOLN PHARMACY 



EN( "s most popular 



Drugstore 



Phone PRE. 2428 

WOLLASTON 
TAILOR AND FURRIER 

T. KA( IIKI. 

TAILORING and REMODELING 

In the Latest Stylos 

690 Hancock St. Wollaston Mass. 



EARL STONE, D.M.D. 



7 Elm Avenue 



Wollaston, Mass. 



RODMAN'S SERVICE STATION 

724 Hancock Street 

AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 



Com ph incuts oj 



DEPENDABLE 
Launderers and Cleansers 

Cash and Carry Stores at 



61 Beale St. 
560 Adams St. 



Wollaston 
East Milton 



Telephone PRE. 8922 



WOLLASTON HARDWARE CO. 

Hardware - Paints 

Kitchen ware 

Plumbing and Heating 

( 'out factors 

Use Our Time Payment Plan 

712 Hancock Street Wollaston 

Phone GRAnite 2004 



M I). Bona 



Prop* 



\l Di P.. nn 



\ 226 } 



GRAnite 8890 



A. J. MURPHY 



Linens and Domestics 



681 Hancock Street 

Near Heale Street 

Wollaston, Mass. 



Wollaston Appliance Center 
675 Hancock Street 

" Your Westinghouse Dealer" 

REFRIGERATORS - RANGES 

WASHING MACHINES 

RADIOS 

A Full Line of Home Electric Appliances 
Phone PRE. 0630 

Tel. GRAnite !)7!)8 

VIVIAN'S DINETTE 

Home-made Pies and Calces 

Home Cooking 

Steaks and Chops 



696 Hancock St. 



Wollaston, Mass. 



Finest Watches 

and First Class 



Repairing 



FRANK LAINE 

667 Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



Tel. GRAnite 8100—8101 
Compliments of . . . 

KARL 1 S 
AUTO BODY REPAIR CO., INC. 

23 Greenwood Avenue 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Karl A. Karjalainen, President 

Cameras 

Motion Picture Equipment 

Photographic Supplies 



Printing and Developing 



Greeting Cards 



WELCH'S 

Camera and Card Center 

680 Hancock St. Wollaston 



{227 > 



Call GRAnite 7500 

CALIFORNIA 
CLEANSERS & DYERS 

Expert Tailoring and Repairing 

STUDENT DISCO! XT 

IV, 

660 Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



I'ahnl Medicine. 



I it nun us 



CARROLL CUT RATE PERFIMER 

19 Beale St. 

Wollaston 



( 'osmetics 



Films 



Compliments of . . . 



DR. REED 



Wollaston, Mass. 



With-// Hi pair . 



. . . whenever the timepiece needs 
attention, brin^r it in ami Id us put 
it righl again. 



Gifts . 



... of all types f<»r all tastes ami at 
a price t hat lit - \ our means. 



RICHARD J. GORMAN 

2.*- A Beale Street - Wollaston 
PREsidenl 5031 

Official Discharge Button Agent AGPO MO 95 



Nelson -I. 



Ken net li II. 



RIGGS & SON 



< ompliments of 



WOLLASTON 

DO-NUT SHOPPE, Inc. 

17 Beale St. 

WOllaston, Mass. 

«.i; \uit. 9721 



Realtors 
Insurance - Motarj - Mortgages 

2.* Beale St., Wollaston, Mass. 

Managers Old Fellows Hall 
81"! Xewport Ave.. Wollaston, Mass 



Office, GRA. l:» in Phone* Home, I'lil 



ERNEST C. HATCH 

Prescription Optician 

25 Beale Street 
Wollaston 7n. Mass. 



i 228 }• 



Compliments of . . . 

BLACKWOOD PHARMACY 

663 Hancock St., cor. Beale 
Wollaston, Mass. 

R. De Nicola, Reg. Pharm., B.S., I'h.C. 

RUSSELL FUNERAL HOME 

Director 
HAROLD A. THURSTON 

— Two Funeral Homes — 

644 Hancock St. Wollaston 

21 Franklin St. South Quincy 

GRAnite 7423 

SERVICE that SERVES and SAVES 



Phone MAYflowcr 0619 



E. A. ERICKSON 
Plumbing and Heating 

58 Woodbine Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 



Telephone 

MAYflowcr WHS 



SHELDON W. LEWIS 

"WEDDING and PARTY SUPPLIES' 

Dennison Goods 

Practical Gifts 

Office and School Supplies 

Fountain Pens and Stationery 

— (Greeting Cards — 



49 Beale St. 

Good Parking 



Wollaston, Mass. 

Shop ir i Hi Pleasure 



CHURCH'S LAUNDRY SERVICE 

624 Hancock Street 
238 Billings Road 

Telephone PREsident 7684 

"Rring Your Laundry to Church" 



Hare Your Radio Repaired . . . 

BY EXPERTS 
.Ml Labor and Parts Guaranteed 

Tubes - Batteries 
New Radios and Appliances 

MID-TOWN RADIO SERVICE 

649 Hancock St. Wollaston 

GRA. 647.* 



{ 229 > 



MCGREGOR'S FLOWER SHOP 



Plants dud Cut Flowers for All Occasions 



Clara MacGregor 



We Specialize in Corsages 
Wedding Bouquets and Floral Pieces 

26 Greenwood Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 



Tel. MAYflowcr 2270 



Compliments of the 

GREETING CARD SHOP 
15 Beale Street, Wollaston, Mass. 



Stationery 



The Most Complete Line of Greet- 
ing Cards on the South Shore. 



Lending Library 



Phone GRAnite .>4:>2 




J. H. HINDS 


JOHN J. GALLAGHER, INC. 


32 Greenwood Avenue 




Wollaston, Mass. 


Building Materials and Hardware 


S. GUMPERT CO., INC. 




Quality 1''<><><1 Desserts 

Ozone Park, New York 


General Offices and Main Yard 




100 Federal Avenue 




Quincy, Mass. 


TEL. (.H\ 0571 Residence: PRE. 6754 




HARDING WELDING CO. 


Retail Store and Branch Yard 


Electric and Acetylene Welding 


North Quincy, Mass. 


Heaters, Boilers. Machinery, Etc. 




Portable Equipmenl 


Telephones 




PREsidenl 2600 PREsidenl 8180 


S Brooks Ave. Quincy, Mass. 





■{ 230 )- 



HOWARD JOHNSON'S 



FAMOUS ICE CREAM IN 
28 FLAVORS 



WHEN IN NEED OF . . . 






Manufacturers of 


Hardware Packard Paints 






Shades, Screen Porches, Venetian Blinds, Screens 


Kitchenware Wall Paper 




Garden Supplies Glass 


Eastern Shade & Screen Company 


THE NEW MODERN STORE 


20 John Street 


Call GRAnite 0041 


North Quincy 71, Mass. 


J. MacFARLAND & SONS 
9 Brook Street Wollaston, Mass. 


Telephone PREsident 088!) 


WOLLASTON PHARMACY, INC. 




323 Newport Avenue 


HANCOCK 


Opposite Wollaston station 


PAINT & VARNISH CO. 


Prescription Specialist 




Since 1894 


53 West Squantum St. 




North Quincy, Mass. 


Quality Drugs - Lowest Prices 





< 231 > 



Koofinu' am 



Metal Work 



-By- 



NORMAN PEMBERTON 



141 Newport Avenue 



Quincy, Mass. 



Spanish — French — Genua n 

WORD CARDS 

For Vocabulary Building 

(Russian in preparation) 

Each set contains over 1200 individual printed 

cards comprising a Basic Vocabulary. On the 

back of each card is the English equivalent. 

Lack of an adequate vocabulary is not only a 

handicap to students but <i deterrent to continued 

use of a language. 

WORD CARDS help to take the drudgery ou1 of 

vocabulary memorization. They are an effective 

supplement to AW system or method of in- 

s| ruction. 



$2.85 a set. postpaid 

The 0. L. S. Co. 

I'm i sulij, it In cha 
8.*1 Hancock St. Quincy 70 Mass. 



We Extend 
Our Cordial 
and Sincere 

BEST 

WISHES 
TO THE 
(LASS 
OF 194? 

WEYMOUTH GAZETTE PRESS 

Printers of the Campus Camera 

18-22 Station Street 
East Weymouth, Mass. 



Specializing in Property Management &: Maintenance 

W. H. HASLETT CO. 

Established ls>n 

837 Hancock Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Telephones: PREsident 088:? - 0884 



Mas 



Plasterers 



Builders 



LIBerty 7700 

JOHN H. MOVMHAN 

JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL 
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

of Boston, Massachusel I s 



One Federal Street 
Boston, Mass. 



i 232 )■ 



. . . Compliments of . . . 



KALAMAZOO HEATING & SUPPLY CO. 



389B Hancock Street 
North Qirincy, Mass. 



George B. Carrier 



Howard R. Olson 



NOGLER & BLACK CO. 

231 Holbrook Road 

North Quincy 71, Mass. 

Nan's Mayonnaise 
Turner's Potato Chips 
Good Luck Margarine 



Pay and Take Furniture Co. 



15 Billings Road 



Norfolk Downs, Mass. 




Ice Cream 
VISIT OUR DAIRY BAR 

".)/</</<' in Milton for Particular People" 

Delicious Food - Nicely Served 

Attractive Surroundings - Appealing Prices 

Business Men's Luncheon - Special Dinners 
Open Daily until 7 P.M. Except Monday 

Corner Central Avenue and Eliot Street 
Milton BLUe Hills 7850 



{ 233 > 



MA VI- LOW KU 2830 



CAMERA SHOP, Inc. 
Photographic Supplies Onh/ 

1241 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Mass. 

CHARLES L. STEARNS, Pre* 



MACHINES SOLI) ON BUDGET PLAN 

QUINCY TYPEWRITER 
SERVICE 

Typewriters - Adding Machines 
and Supplies 

SOLD - RENTED - REPAIRED 

One Maple Street Quincy, Mass. 



YOU ARE WELCOME 

at the 
QUINCY Y.M.C.A. 

Special Rates to Students 



GRA. 0392 



Telephones 



PKE. 2054 



PATTERSON'S FLOWER SHOP 

1283 Hancock Street 
Quincy 



( !orsages 



Palms 



(drls who care say 
'Get my corsage al Patterson's' 

KLSIE M PATTERSON 
Proprietor 



Compliments of 

WEBSTER'S DEPT. STORE 

Hancock Street 
Quincy, Mass. 



Compliments of 

Pettengill's Jewelry Store 

7-11 Cottage Avenue 

Quincy, Mass. 



Tel. PKE. 6250 



()pi>. Sheridan's 



BEST WISHES 
TO CLASS OF 1946 




{234) 



< OXCRATTLATIOXS 



(LASS OF '-Mi 



from 



REMICK'S 



SPORTING GOODS 

Baseball-Golf -Tennis 

Archery - Fishing 
Badminton - Softball 






Equipment For Ever;/ Sport 

WM. WESTLAND & CO. 

DONAHER'S, INCORPORATED 
Men's Store 

(Quality Clothing and Haberdasher}/ 

1559 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Mass. 

Win. 1). Michael. O.l). 
Win. D. Michael, Jr., O.I). 

Optometrists 

1581 Hancock Street 

Quincy, Mass. 

'I' etc plume: PREsident 6735 



Compliments of . . 



SEARS ROEBUCK CO. 



Quincy, Mass. 



Compliments of . . . 

J. BLOOM & CO. 

123-125 Pearl Street 

Boston, Mass. 

Wholesale Paper Deiler over Thirty Years 
Corner Central Avenue and Eliot Street 

THE CHURCH 
BEAUTIFUL 

A Practical Study 
in Church Architecture 

By John R. Scotford 
$3.50 

"Nowhere else in the field of church architecture 
and worship has so much practical wisdom been 
compressed into so brief a space. ... It faces prob- 
lems which every church must face in building or 
re-building, and presents solutions which seem, to 
the reviewer, to be architecturally right, psycho- 
logically sound and of the highest importance in 
the conduct of public worship. It excels in its 
marvelous illustrations. The pictures are not only 
of art in themselves, but each one (caches a lesson 
on some salient point of architectural wisdom." 
—Albert W, Palmer, Chicago Theological Seminary 

THE PILGRIM PRESS 

14 Beacon St., Boston 8, Mass. 



1!) S. LaSalle St. 
Chicago S, 111. 



L24 \V. Fourth St. 

Dayton '-', Ohio 



{ 235 ]• 



GROSSMAN'S 



THE FINEST OF EVERYTHING TO BUILD WITH 

ELEVEN STORES SERVING NEW ENGLAND 
WITH THE FINEST HOME CONSTRUCTION 
AND MAINTENANCE MATERIALS 

Main Store: 130 Granite Street, Quincy PRE. 7100 

Atlantic - Billerica - Fitchburg - Maiden - New Bedford - Quincy 
Sagamore - Taunton - Wellesley - Plymouth, X. II. - Salem, X. II. 

L. GROSSMAN SONS, INC. 



FOUNDRY ENGINEERS 

and 

CONSULTANTS 



EDWIN S. CARMAN, INC 



KiL'J Lee Road 
Cleveland, Ohio 

{ 236 } 




7. Creation 



TECHNICAL 

2. Excellence 



3. Production 



♦ 



This unique three -fold service mode 
possible your Noutilus for 1947 



Warren Press 

160 WARREN STREET BOSTON 19, MASS. 



{ 237 } 



W. H. BEARD, D.M.D. 

1011 Beacon Street 
Boston, Mass. 



Te. BEAcon 1563 



Tel. LIBerty 6741—6742 

RALPH H. WIGHT 
PERCY A. WIGHT 

Optometrists 

For Over Fifty Years on Winter Street 
47 Winter St. near Tremont Boston 

Office Hours— (»:()<) a.m. t<> 5:00 p.m. 



< 'ompliments of . 



RIVAL FOODS, INC. 

38 Henry Street 

Cambridge 39, Mass. 



BRAYTON 

WILSON 
(OLE 
CORPORATION 

fabricators of 

Steel and Ornamental Iron 

130 Magazine Street 

Roxbury District 

Boston, Mass. 



< 'ompliments of 

LISK-SAVORY CORPORATION 

Buffalo, New York 

Enamelware and Galvanized Ware 

II. M. W. BRIGHAM Maine, N. II.. Vt & Mass. 
II. \l. \V. BRIGHAM, JR. Eastern Massachusetts 
ELMER C. BRIGHAM Western New York 

JAMES T. RAM). M.I. Metropolitan Boston 



i 238 } 



SKILLFUL 
PHOTO-ENGRAVING... 



So necessary to the 
success of your Annual, 
was entrusted to us. 
Black and White and 

the COLOR, too! 



ROBERTS ENGRAVING CO, 

ONE FIFTEEN WHITE STREET 
SOUTH WEYMOUTH, MASS. 



{ 239 > 



( 1 294 
Telephones, CAPito] \ 1295 



1354 



HICKS & HODGES CO. 



PURVEYORS OF FINE FOOD 



45 SOUTH MARKET STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 





GIOVINO & CO. 


Compliments <>J 


Established 1884 




Wholesale Grocers 


WEBSTER-THOMAS CO. 


Also complete line of 




Fruit iind Produce 


217 STATE ST., BOSTON, MASS. 


Serving New England for over (iO years 




19 21 Commercial Street 


PACKERS AM) DISTRIBUTORS 


Boston 


MATCHLESS 


LAFayette 5050 -1-2-3-4 




BRAND 




FOODS 






< 'ompliments of 


1 WM.I) FRUITS 




C \\\T.I> VEGETABLES 


FROST COAL & OIL CO. 


PICKLES - RELISHES - CONDIMENTS 




FANCi QUALITY THROUGHOl T 





{240} 



INDIVIDUALITY 



The preservation 

of this 
CHARACTERISTIC 

for 

each person who 

appeared before 

our camera was 

our responsibility. 

• 

To this end we have 

fulfilled the trust. 

May your 

COLLEGE PORTRAIT 

bring happy memories 

of the days spent 

at 

E. N. C 



HARVARD STUDIO 

669 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

{ Ml i 



Bolton - Smart 
Company, Inc. 

Wholesale Purveyors of Choice 

BEEF, LAMB. VEAL, PORK, POULTRY, FISH 
BUTTER, CHEESE, E(;(.S AND RELISHES 



17-25 South Market Street 



Telephone: LAFayette 1900 



Boston, Mass. 



Compliments of 

THE MILLER PRODUCE COMPANY 

FANEUIL HALL 

BOSTON J), MASSACHUSETTS 



( 'ompliments oj 


THOS. F. KINNEALEY & CO. 


DOLE & BAILEY, INC. 


Wholesale Meats 


ESTABLISHED [800 




M E A T S 


2 Faneuil Hall Market 




■.it, Sidt 


19-21 2.? New Faneuil Hall Market 


Boston 9, Mass. 


BOSTON, MASS. 


Telephone 1. V Fayette 0370 



(242) 



STILL AVAILABLE 

Gospel Special Song Folders 

By 

SCHTJRMAN, RUNDLETT & HILL 

. I ddress : 

MRS. RITA RUNDLETT 

:5.'5A Myrtle Street 
Waltham, Mass. 



Evangelical Literature s* Gifts of Abiding Value 



FeiL0^SH/P =5 BOO* ST0tt 

cS^td thz /land ' id '^fc ^mAttcMrtJi^th^plmalwi 



Compliments 
of 



GREYHOUND 

Lines 



9 PARK ST. WL BOSTON 8, MASS.j 








BIBLES FOR YOUTH . . . 

"If I had to choose between a college education 
without the Bible and a knowledge of the Bible 
without a college education, I would take the 
knowledge of the Bible. . . . The Bible deals with 
the basic values of life." — Wm. Lyon Phelps 

Massachusetts Bible Society 
41 Bromfield St., Boston 

All Bibles sold at cost or liberal discount! 


Post -War 

Investment 

Strategy 

Would you like to check your in- 
vestment strategy with that of 


BOSTON MUSIC COMPANY 

116 Boylston Street 
Boston 16, Mass. 

Telephone Order Department 
HANcock 1561 

"Everything In Music" 


Babson's? If so, clip this advertise- 
ment, send it to us with a list of 
seven securities you own. We'll tell 
you whether our strategy is to Hold 
or Switch. No cost or obligation. 

Write Department . . . 

BABSON'S REPORTS 

Wellesley Hills 82, Mass. 



i 243 > 



Compliments of 




W. C. LAHUE, INC 

General Contractors 



Lowell, Mass. 



(244) 



JOHN HAMRE & SONS 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



OUINCY, MASS. 



BUILDERS OF MUNRO HALL ADDITION 



< 245 } 



CHURCH FURNITURE 



STAINED GLASS 



and other supplies 



for the Church 



WHITTEMORE ASSOCIATES, INC. 

16 ASHBURTON PLACE 

BOSTON 8, MASSACHUSETTS 

WRITE FOR CATALOG 

{246> 



Our Advertisers 









" "" " 


A /I 


ywij 






3TA /|JH 






s J^aBi 


1 




Sl^I 




»dll£*^^^ 


^ C^f 


|^*r-J 



CHURCHES 



AKRON DISTRICT (OHIO) 




174 


Binghamton 










184 


Akron, First Church 

Alliance 

Barberton 






175 
218 
181 


Buffalo . 

Elmira 

Jamestown 










218 
185 
218 


Cambridge 
Cleveland, Emmanuel . 






218 
181 


Owego 
Schenectady 










185 
184 


Cleveland, Euclid Chapel 
Cleveland, First 






175 
176 


Syracuse. 
Vermontville 








185 
184 


Copley 






181 




East Liverpool, First 
East Palestine 






177 
178 


NEW ENGLAND DISTRICT 




186 


Greene 






218 


Augusta, Me. 




195 


Greentown . 






218 


Beverly, Mass. 








190 


Jefferson 






176 


Burlington, Vt. 








188 


Ravenna 






181 


Cambridge, Mass. . 








191 


Salem .... 






178 


Derry, N. H. 








194 


Urichsville 






179 


District N.Y.P.S. . 








195 


Warren, Bolindale 






176 


Everett, Mass. 








194 


Warren, First 






180 


Framingham, Mass. 








188 


Warwick 






181 


Lowell, Mass. 








192 


Wolf Run . . 






175 


Maiden, Mass. 








188 


Youngstown . 






178 


Manchester, Conn. 








190 




Melrose, Mass. . 








194 


ALBANY DISTRICT (NEW YORK) 182 


New Bedford, Mass. 
New Haven, Conn. 








193 
191 


Albany 185 


Norwood, Mass. 








190 


Altona 183 


Pawtucket, R. I. 








187 


Auburn .... 






185 


Providence. R 


. I. . 








193 



{ 247 > 



Rockland, Me. 






218 


Somerset 






203 


Skowhegan, Me. . 






191 


Warren 204 


South Portland, Me. 






187 




Springfield, Mass. 






194 


WASHINGTON-PHILADELPHIA 


Waltham, Mass. . 






187 


DISTRICT 


Waterbury, Conn. 






193 


Allentown, Pa. 






215 


Waterville, Vt. . 






192 


Baltimore, Md. 






207 


Wollaston, Mass. 






189 


















Bel Air, Md.. 






218 


West Somerville, Mass. 






195 












Bloomsburg, Pa. 






210 




Chester, Pa. . 






208 




Collingdale, Pa. 






209 


NEW YORK DISTRICT . 197 


Cumberland, Md. 






213 


Beacon, N. Y. . 






198 


Deepwater, N. J. . 






208 


Danbury, Conn. 






199 


Easton, Pa. 






216 


Dover, N. J. 






197 


Eastport, Md. 






211 


East Rockaway, N. Y. . 






199 


Frederick, Md. 






215 


Hoople, Brooklyn, N. Y. 






198 


Frostburg, Md. 






210 


Kingston, N. Y. . 






198 


Hagerstown, Md. 






211 


Middletown, N. Y. 






197 


Hanover, Pa. 






218 


Richmond Hill, N. Y. . 






198 


Lansdale, Pa. 






212 




Millville, N. J. . 






218 




New Cumberland, Pa. 






208 




Norristown, Pa. 






216 


ONTARIO DISTRICT 


















Oxford, Pa. . 






216 


Hamilton 






218 


Philadelphia, Pa. . 






211 


Toronto, First . 






201 


Reading, Pa. . 






209 


Toronto, Main St. 






201 


Royersford, Pa. 






212 


Toronto, St. Clair 






201 


Seat Pleasant, Md. 






215 


West Toronto 






218 


Trenton, N. J. 






215 




Washington, D. C. 






214 




West Chester, Pa. 






213 


PITTSBURGH DISTRICT (PA.) 


Wilmington, Del. 






213 






York, Pa. 






210 


Bradford 


205 




Erie .... 






203 




Grove City 






203 


EVANGELISTS 


Homer City . 






218 


Mackey, D. D. 217 


Irwin .... 






205 


McCusker, Thomas J. .179 


New Brighton 






205 


Mooshian, C. Helen . .179 


New Castle 






203 


Olson, Mary E. . 217 


Pittsburgh, First 






203 


Plummer, Chester D. 






217 



(248) 



COMMERCIAL 



WOLLASTON 

Blackwood Pharmacy . 
California Cleansers 
Carroll Cut Rate . 
Church's Laundry . 
Dependable Launderers 
Deware Funeral Home 
Dr. Reed 

Eastern Nazarene College 
Erickson Plumbing 
Dugout .... 
Frost Coal & Oil Co. . 
Gorman Jeweler . 
Greeting Card Shop . 
Hamre & Son 
Hatch, Ernest C. . 
Hinds, J. H. 
Howard Johnson's 
Karl's Auto Body Repair 
KauFfman, E. H. . 
Laine, Frank . 
Lincoln Pharmacy 
McGregor's Flower Shop 
MacFarland Hardware 
Mid-Town Radio 
Murphy, A. J. 
Riggs, & Son 
Rodman's Service Station 
Russell Funeral Home 
Sheldon W. Lewis 
Sigma Delta Alpha 
Sigma Delta Beta . 
Sigma Delta Gamma 
Stone, Earl, D.M.D. 
Vivian's Dinette 
Welch's Camera Shop 
W. H. HaslettCo. 
Wollaston Appliance 
Wollaston Do-Nut Shoppe 



Wollaston Tailor 



Wollaston Hardware 
900 Wollaston Pharmacy 

228 
228 
229 
226 
224 
228 
222 
229 
225 
240 
228 
230 
245 
228 
230 
231 
227 
195 
227 



QUINCY 

Camera Shop . 
Donahers Clothing 
Gallagher, John J. 
Grossman's 

Harding Welding Co. 
H. P. Hood & Son 
Michael, Wm. D. 
Patterson's Flower Shop 
Pemberton, Norman 
Pettengill's 
Quincy Linotype 
Quincy Typewriter 
Remick's 

Sears Roebuck Co. 
Sheridan's 
225 Webster's Dept. Store 

230 Westland Sporting Co. 

231 Y.M.C.A. . . 

229 
227 
228 
226 
229 
229 
223 
223 
223 
226 
227 
227 
232 



op 



BOSTON 

Babson's Reports . 
Bolton-Smart Co., Inc 
Boston Music Co. 
Brayton Wilson Cole C 
Dole & Bailey 
Giovino & Co. 
Greyhound Lines 
Harvard Studios 
Hicks & Hodges 
J. Bloom & Co. 

227 Kinnealey, Thos. F. & Co. 

228 Lisk-Savory Corp. 

{ 249 > 



226 
231 
226 



234 
235 
230 
236 
230 
225 
235 
234 
232 
234 
232 
234 
235 
235 
234 
234 
235 
234 



243 
242 
243 
238 
242 
240 
243 
241 
240 
235 
242 
238 



Mass. Bible Society 
Miller Produce 
Moynihan, John H. 
Fellowship Book Store 
Pilgrim Press . 
Rival Foods Inc. 
Roberts Engraving Co. 
Warren Press 
Webster-Thomas Co. 
W. H. Beard, D.M.D. 
Whittemore Associates 
Wight, Ralph H. & Percy A 
Youth For Christ . 



Carman, Edwin S. 
Crusader Quartet 









243 


Dickson, Clarence A. . 








242 


Eastern Shade 








232 


Emery, Maurice R. 








243 


Hammar, Wilford F. 








235 


Hancock, Paint 








238 


Henck, Nelson H. 








239 


Hendrie's Ice Cream 








237 


Herrschaft, William 








240 


Hill, Paul 








238 


Kalamazoo . 








246 


McEwan, Harold M. 


cy A 






238 
196 


Nazarene Publishing House 
Nogler 8c Black Co. . 




Pay & Take Furniture Co. 




Shoff, Robert J. . 


A KIC^I IC 


Spangenberg, Leonard M. . 


AINbvJUb 


Ward, Rev. and Mrs. H. B. 


. 236 


W. C. Lahue, Inc.. . 








196 


Weymouth Gazette 



199 
231 
218 
218 
231 
218 
233 
218 
243 
233 
192 
219 
233 
233 
218 
218 
218 
244 
232 



{ 260 }• 



Appreciation 

It is impossible for us to close the cover on this volume 
without saying a word of grateful appreciation to those who have 
guided us to this final destination. 

This book represents the best in yearbook production,- 
that which comes through years of study and evaluation. It is the 
sum total of keen insight, clear vision, and controlled enthusiasm 
— the acme of plain perfection. 

To Mr. Paul Blanchard of Warren Press, Mr. Verrill 
Carter of Roberts Engraving Company, and Mr. "Charlie" lanello 
of Harvard Studios, and their respective co-laborers, we extend 
our sincere appreciation. We want you to feel that this high type 
production is more than a summation of set goals and standards,- 
that it is a monumental tribute to your life's perspective, a needful 
and lasting contribution to society. 

Thank you very kindly, 

1947 NAUTILUS STAFF 



{251 } 



Autographs